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Teacher recruitment and retention in England

Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report stated that maintaining teacher supply had become more difficult in recent years and that this is “particularly concerning” given that demand for teachers is expected to rise as a result of increases in pupil numbers. It added that relative pay trends, whereby “significant gaps” had developed between the pay of teachers and the earnings available in other gradate professions, are “important contributory factors in the recruitment and retention problems facing the teaching profession in England and Wales.” While noting that pay is not the only factor affecting teacher recruitment and retention, the report argued that “a competitive pay system will help schools to maintain the effective workforce of good teachers and school leaders…”
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report stated that maintaining teacher supply had become more difficult in recent years and that this is “particularly concerning” given that demand for teachers is expected to rise as a result of increases in pupil numbers. It added that relative pay trends, whereby “significant gaps” had developed between the pay of teachers and the earnings available in other gradate professions, are “important contributory factors in the recruitment and retention problems facing the teaching profession in England and Wales.” While noting that pay is not the only factor affecting teacher recruitment and retention, the report argued that “a competitive pay system will help schools to maintain the effective workforce of good teachers and school leaders…”
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report stated that average teacher salaries “remain considerably lower for teaching than other graduate professions.” It added that trends in teacher recruitment and retention “continue to face substantial pressures”, with the number of qualified teachers leaving the profession for reasons other than retirement continuing to rise, teacher retention rates deteriorating, and the number of schools reporting vacancies and temporarily-filled posts increasing “markedly over the last five years.” There is a “real risk”, the report stated, that the cumulative impact of these factors will mean that schools “will not be able to recruit and retain a workforce of high quality teachers.” The report noted that this was a particular concern given the projected increase in pupil numbers.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report stated that maintaining teacher supply had become more difficult in recent years and that this is “particularly concerning” given that demand for teachers is expected to rise as a result of increases in pupil numbers. It added that relative pay trends, whereby “significant gaps” had developed between the pay of teachers and the earnings available in other gradate professions, are “important contributory factors in the recruitment and retention problems facing the teaching profession in England and Wales.” While noting that pay is not the only factor affecting teacher recruitment and retention, the report argued that “a competitive pay system will help schools to maintain the effective workforce of good teachers and school leaders…”
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report stated that average teacher salaries “remain considerably lower for teaching than other graduate professions.” It added that trends in teacher recruitment and retention “continue to face substantial pressures”, with the number of qualified teachers leaving the profession for reasons other than retirement continuing to rise, teacher retention rates deteriorating, and the number of schools reporting vacancies and temporarily-filled posts increasing “markedly over the last five years.” There is a “real risk”, the report stated, that the cumulative impact of these factors will mean that schools “will not be able to recruit and retain a workforce of high quality teachers.” The report noted that this was a particular concern given the projected increase in pupil numbers.
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Project Handbook In Partial Completion of Doctoral Requirements. Teacher Recruitment, Induction, and Retention Handbook to Support School Leaders

Project Handbook In Partial Completion of Doctoral Requirements. Teacher Recruitment, Induction, and Retention Handbook to Support School Leaders

In a 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey, Ingersoll (2006) found 58 percent of all schools reported at least some difficulty filling one or more teaching job openings, in one or more fields. According to that same survey the following were cited as reasons why teachers leave the profession: retirement, school staffing action, family or personal reasons, to pursue other jobs, and teachers’ dissatisfaction. It should be noted that teachers’ dissatisfaction accounted for 50 percent of those leaving. Guarino, Santibanez, Daley, and Brewer (2004), in their paper for the Rand Corporation, A Review of the Research Literature on Teacher Recruitment and Retention wrote “in the face of a growing school-aged population, schools and districts must struggle to maintain standards for teaching quality while continuously recruiting bright new teachers and seeking to retain their most effective existing teachers” (p. 1). As a result, school districts must develop a plan to attract, hire, and retain the most qualified and most promising educators for their students.
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Teacher Recruitment and Retention in Select First Nations Schools

Teacher Recruitment and Retention in Select First Nations Schools

The school improvement movement, widely embraced by educational practitioners both nationally and internationally, has featured an embedded emphasis on assessment of meaningful student learning and academic achievement (Purinton, 2011; Harris, 2003). Ongoing research toward better understanding student learning has revealed that there are persistent academic achievement gaps for some groups of students (Fullan, 2005; Blankstein, 2004), and in 2000 and 2004, the Auditor General also noted this educational achievement gap between First Nations and non-First Nations students. Historically, First Nations students have experienced significantly lower levels of educational achievement and attainment than non-First Nations students (White, Maxim, & Spence, 2004; Wotherspoon, 2006). Systemic issues which affect student achievement must be addressed in order to improve the educational processes and maximize educational outcomes for Aboriginal people (Helin, 2006; Poelzer, 2009). Teacher recruitment and retention, closely connected with teacher efficacy, are considered as causal factors that influence the quality of student learning and educational achievement. Teacher recruitment and retention are critical factors affecting the delivery of quality educational services in rural and remote areas including reserve schools.
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Teacher recruitment and retention in England

Teacher recruitment and retention in England

There are a number of financial incentives aimed at encouraging recruitment to initial teacher training, including bursaries and scholarships for individuals training in certain subjects. The level of bursary varies with the subject and with the degree class of the trainee. Trainees with a first class degree in physics, for example, are eligible for a bursary of £30,000 in 2017-18; the bursary for a trainee with a first class history degree is £9,000. Some teacher training routes also offer a salary during training (for example, Teach First and School Direct (salaried)). Further information is available on the Get Into Teaching website at: Bursaries and funding.
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Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

The follow-up questionnaires were administered using a range of methods, depending on what the CC consid- ered most appropriate for their families and on family preference. In each mailing, a covering letter bearing the study logo and a copy of the study information sheet were enclosed. Study researchers made telephone calls to the families, either sensitising them to the arrival of the questionnaire or reminding them to complete and return it. The pre-notification of questionnaire receipt has been successful previously [10] and also served to remind fam- ilies of their participation in this study. If families ap- peared reluctant to respond to the postal request, they were offered the opportunity to complete the mini ques- tionnaire by telephone with a member of the research team. The mini-mini questionnaire was completed over the telephone if the research team felt that the longer questionnaires would not be completed. Persistence in obtaining follow-up data has been reported as a successful strategy in retention of participants at follow-up [19]. If participants did not respond after all three questionnaires had been sent and/or if there was refusal of the offer of telephone completion, this was considered a passive re- fusal to provide follow-up data.
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Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

The follow-up questionnaires were administered using a range of methods, depending on what the CC consid- ered most appropriate for their families and on family preference. In each mailing, a covering letter bearing the study logo and a copy of the study information sheet were enclosed. Study researchers made telephone calls to the families, either sensitising them to the arrival of the questionnaire or reminding them to complete and return it. The pre-notification of questionnaire receipt has been successful previously [10] and also served to remind fam- ilies of their participation in this study. If families ap- peared reluctant to respond to the postal request, they were offered the opportunity to complete the mini ques- tionnaire by telephone with a member of the research team. The mini-mini questionnaire was completed over the telephone if the research team felt that the longer questionnaires would not be completed. Persistence in obtaining follow-up data has been reported as a successful strategy in retention of participants at follow-up [19]. If participants did not respond after all three questionnaires had been sent and/or if there was refusal of the offer of telephone completion, this was considered a passive re- fusal to provide follow-up data.
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Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

Recruitment and retention strategies and the examination of attrition bias in a randomised controlled trial in children’s centres serving families in disadvantaged areas of England

Using a range of recruitment strategies enabled our trial to exceed its sample size requirements despite recruiting in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. This was help- ful as 32% of recruited participants were lost to follow-up. Attrition did not differ between treatment arms, but there was evidence of social patterning of attrition, with the more disadvantaged being less likely to be retained in the trial. Studies recruiting disadvantaged populations should measure and report on attrition by socioeconomic vari- ables to enable the extent of attrition bias and the poten- tial impact on results to be assessed. Where differential attrition is anticipated from participants in more disadvan- taged areas, consideration should be given to differential over-sampling at baseline to allow for greater loss from this subset of the study sample and/or to targeted and more intensive methods of participant retention in these sub-groups. This study showed that no single strategy could be identified that, in isolation, optimised recruit- ment and retention; we conclude that a multifaceted ap- proach should be considered when undertaking trials of this kind.
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The recruitment and retention of senior legal officers in district councils in England and Wales

The recruitment and retention of senior legal officers in district councils in England and Wales

Structuralist (segmented labour market) approaches focus on the ways the capitalist or patriarchal market structures constrain women1s and minorities' access to the full range of occupations10^ . One structuralist approach, dual labour market theory, argues that there has been an historical trend toward the division of the labour market into core(primary) and peripheral(secondary) sectors110. While these terms have been used here to link factors regarding the internal structure of organisations and aspects of the labour market, notice should be taken of their separate and distinctive theoretical basis. Segmented labour market theories explain, in the main, the general distribution of men, women and minorities across different occupations, but not the distribution of tasks in the same occupation but different organisations111. The theories identify how the differences at organisational level, in the terms of employment, compensation, work arrangements and recruitment practices, influence the very real difference in career prospects for women and minority group members, compared with white men, in the same o c c u p a t i o n 11^, and indeed between themselves.
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Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy

Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy

However, too many teachers leave within the first 5 years, with drop-out within the first 2 years particularly sharp. Many schools provide excellent support for new teachers. However, just when the job is most challenging, too many teachers feel unsupported to make the difference that brought them into the profession. As with other top professions, we are determined to create a package of support and incentives so that every new teacher is supported to lay the platform for a fulfilling and rewarding career. To do so, we must address the following key challenges:

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EIGHT QUESTIONS ON TEACHER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION: WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH SAY?

EIGHT QUESTIONS ON TEACHER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION: WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH SAY?

Villegas and Clewell (1998), also a comparative descriptive study of the same programs, surveyed 1,763 program participants between 1995 and 2000. One set of programs served emergency-certified teachers and the other served Peace Corps veterans. Most, though not all, of these programs were “alternative route” programs that placed participants as full-time teachers in classrooms very early in the program instead of upon completion. The study found that programs for emergency-certified teachers had an overwhelming majority of participants who were minorities, while the Peace Corps program had very few minority participants. For both sets of programs, participants were carefully screened and evaluated and given at least several weeks’ intensive preservice training. Then during their full-time assignment to the classroom, participants were provided with ongoing supervision, mentoring, education coursework, counseling, peer support and family support (such as child care). Support for participants continued, in most cases, for a year after their graduation from the program. Eighty-five percent of the Peace Corps teachers completed the program, compared to 75% of the emergency-certified teachers. The study also looked at the retention rates for program graduates. It found that 78% of Peace Corps program participants taught for at least three years after graduation, which exceeded the national average of 71%. Approximately 12% of participants subsequently left teaching, however. About 81% of the emergency-
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Recruitment and retention strategy

Recruitment and retention strategy

Through this innovative project in the South East and Midlands areas of England, individual employers and registered care providers have worked together to share knowledge, experience and good practice on a broad range of recruitment and retention related topics. An independent evaluation of Link Up, completed in early 2014, found it to have “considerable value and a strong rationale”, highlighting an array of benefits for those involved. The Link Up step by step guide has been produced to support other employers wishing to implement this new way of working. This guide is being rolled out nationally during 2014.
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Recruitment and retention issues in rural labour markets

Recruitment and retention issues in rural labour markets

context need to be considered as well. The impact of employers‟ labour demands on the economy of rural areas is complex, making it is difficult to distinguish between causes and effects. The demand for low-skilled labour in these areas, for instance, can be seen as presenting a challenge to increasing the aspirations of the population. Moreover, it has also been suggested that areas with a population characterised by a lack of skills may deter businesses requiring higher skills to establish in such areas. Other rural areas in England (e.g., Cornwall, Devon and South Hams) are taking actions to tackle this cycle by adopting measures to reduce their reliance on low wage sectors and to attract higher value-added industries. It will require efforts at various scales (local, sub-regional, regional and national) to achieve this so as to help increase the quality of employment opportunities and life of their population. Indeed, at national level, the importance of stimulating demand for higher skilled jobs through investing in long-term business development, treating skills as a long-term investment and seeking to operate in high value markets is increasingly accepted (UK Commission for Employment and Skills, 2010).
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The recruitment and retention of headteachers in Scotland: main report:

The recruitment and retention of headteachers in Scotland: main report:

175. Headteachers, teachers and deputes held one highly satisfying aspect of the job in common―the power to influence the lives of children, to be surprised by their hidden abilities and to raise expectations (particularly in areas of deprivation). “You can’t beat working with children”, said one head in post for over two decades who, like so many primary colleagues, claimed in interview still to be a teacher at heart, taking pleasure from evidence of children’s personal growth as much as in their academic success. To watch a child develop from age three to the age of 12 was to play a part in the most influential years of a child’s learning beyond narrow definitions of attainment. Heads talked of when they were swamped by bureaucracy or immobilised by frustration, at the emotional lift of going into a classroom, seeing and talking to children, or taking a class themselves. In spite of pressing priorities, a large number of heads, particularly in primary schools, set aside scheduled time for teaching or for making ad hoc visits to classrooms which were described as occasions for “celebrating achievement” or enjoying “the wow factor”.
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The recruitment, deployment and management of supply teachers in England

The recruitment, deployment and management of supply teachers in England

Everything eventually went horribly wrong, a bad school. I had no idea who the headmaster was for the first two or three weeks. I saw this guy every now and again just hanging out in one of the rooms with a moustache and I didn't know who he was. He was the headmaster. But I think what happened in this case was I had come in, they had already had six supply teachers before me and so I was number seven, you know I think in my first week one of them said lets see how quickly we can break you. … and so I was pretty wound up. I went into this one class, they were just a pain in the arse and it finally got to the point where I couldn’t deal with them any more. There was no one specific student, I didn't pick up a chair and chuck it or anything, but it was just the continual amount of talking in the background and not listening and not getting on with the work and talking back. And trying to get the support and not getting it, and finally it just got the point where I just snapped and I had never, ever done that in a classroom before. But I just suddenly found myself, not just speaking loudly, but genuinely yelling at the top of my voice. I think, and this is the one thing I am really ashamed of, I even punched the table. And I saw myself doing it, going, what the hell am I doing? (Supply teacher in focus group)
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Recruitment and retention of teachers with industrial or professional experience

Recruitment and retention of teachers with industrial or professional experience

A significant proportion of the academic FE workforce are often recruited from craft or occupational bases - well recognised professions in themselves. Such people may adhere to their expertise and may be reluctant to embark on teacher training programmes (see literature review). The survey indicated a mismatch between the need for new staff to have particular credentials – particularly teaching qualifications, skills and experience – and the availability of those attributes among new recruits. All colleges said they were providing assistance to enable staff to obtain a teaching qualification. This took the form of the payment of tuition fees, which was almost universal, and, in most colleges, remission from learner contact hours of three hours on average for full-time staff and two hours for part-time. Some of the colleges visited had adopted the additional approach of replacing some classroom teaching duties with tutoring, in order to reduce the preparation and marking burden on new recruits. Others had reviewed the delivery of their teachers’ training to facilitate trade professionals to acquire the qualification. The revised training was more ‘hands on’ and designed to reflect previous experience.
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Recruitment and retention in the post-16 learning and skills sector

Recruitment and retention in the post-16 learning and skills sector

3.17 Only a small number of respondents join the sector early in their career after qualifying as a teacher via the PGCE route. Of those who do join as ‘new entrants’, after a teaching degree, very few embarked on teacher training with the expectation of working in the post-16 sector. Rather, this small sub-group tend to ‘discover’ the post-16 sector, specifically further education, whilst on their post-graduate course. Teaching in the post-16 sector is not a career that undergraduates are particularly aware of or aspire to:

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