Top PDF Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom

Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom

Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom

, I became all too conscious of my actions and surroundings. I always monitored myself, constantly checking to ensure that I didn’t give away too much information or say anything that might trigger concern in someone. If I was feeling a certain way, I did my best to conceal it. I didn’t want anyone to give me any more attention than I was comfortable with. This is something that has been with me through the entirety of my life. One of my mottos for this thing called living is not to influence and not to be influenced. I think in terms of how I affect other people and catalyze their course of action. People tend to emotionally burden themselves with the dilemmas and personal happenings of another when it isn’t needed or rather consensual, and this causes turbulence for all involved. With this kind of rationale, however, you inadvertently push people away. The more I kept to myself and steered shy of letting other people in, the easier it became for people to look past me and not want to involve themselves. It’s funny because at a young age I didn’t realize I was causing that result. I didn’t realize how much I actually wanted to open myself up to other people. I didn’t and couldn’t relate my personal experience with someone else’s because I didn’t allow it. I made myself a lone stranger with alien feelings when really
Show more

282 Read more

Teaching Writing Recount Text Through Personal Journal Writing

Teaching Writing Recount Text Through Personal Journal Writing

Referring to the result of the research, the writer provides some constructive suggestions as follows: (1) The teacher is suggested to apply personal journal writing in teaching writing recount text because it helps the students to be easier in writing recount text, gives the students more practices, and stimulates the VWXGHQWV¶ WKLQNLQJ DQG OHDUQLQJ ZKLFK PDNHs them more interested, motivated and joyful in the teaching and learning process. (2) The teacher has to make sure that all the students focus on a particular theme and topic given so both teacher and students can discuss well. (3) The students are suggested to be more active and creative in the classroom. They have to train themselves to write at home and ask questions at classroom. By having more chance to practice, the can be more independent in learning. It can help them to be more critical in thinking and gaining much more knowledge. (4) The institution (school and university) are suggested to support the unconventional teaching learning activity by providing enough media and facility. Those are really needed to help the improvement of teaching and learning process.
Show more

10 Read more

Autoethnography of “My Autoethnography”

Autoethnography of “My Autoethnography”

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on “My Autoethnography” that I performed during writing dissertation for M.Phil. in Education at a university in Nepal. For this, I reflect on my experience of doing autoethnography with four turning points – a connection to mentors, a presentation of poetic narrative in a class, a proposal for this research, and the dissemination of “My Autoethnography”. I present an evocative narrative of ‘the parallels’ connecting childhood experiences with blissful eternal dance. I analyse it from the perspective of methodological, relational and ethical lenses. I present some merits and caveats of autoethnography as a method of research based on my experience of using the approach. This also helped me to see not only to the past and present, but it also opened my eyes to envision the future in terms of learning and teaching mathematics. The other merit was access to my private world through the construction of thick and rich evocative narratives with a variety of textual expressions and a sense of mental emancipation. The major caveats of this approach were associated with the extent of focus in writing the narratives, vagueness with mystical expression and imaginative connections between the events of different time, an indulgence on personal stories making forceful connection with theories, self-disclosure of sensitive issues, and ethical issues related to the narratives about the others. I conclude the paper with a reflection and poetic reminiscent of ‘My Autoethnography’.
Show more

20 Read more

Being Cyborg, Teaching Writing: Figuring a Feminist Practice in the Computer Composition Classroom

Being Cyborg, Teaching Writing: Figuring a Feminist Practice in the Computer Composition Classroom

The technology-rich classroom itself can help decenter the learning environment through both classroom design and visible connectivity to the world beyond academic borders, according to Roxanne Kent-Drury in “Finding a Place to Stand: Negotiating the Spatial Configuration of the Networked Computer Classroom.” Kent-Drury analyzes the difference between teacher’s and student’s conceptions of traditional classroom space and Internet-networked classroom space and concludes that both traditional and Internet- connected classrooms are actually spatially indeterminate areas whose boundaries reach beyond the academic institution; however, web connectivity makes the spatial indeterminacy of technology-rich learning environments visible (393). Such “global interconnectivity” leads to disorientation for many instructors: “Disoriented, the instructor can experience the sensation of having no place to stand, no central position from which to direct and focus the class” (Kent-Drury 387). Rather than asserting a modernist authority in a decentered postmodern space, Kent-Drury suggests that teachers help students understand their role in the “global community” through analyzing the demographics and content of internet sites, creating their own personal Web pages, and authoring collaboratively a class Website. She believes such a series of assignments refocuses the classroom without relying on illusions of a finite, discrete classroom space.
Show more

128 Read more

My Story of Sal: A Critical Self-reflective Autoethnography Revealing Whiteness in the Classroom

My Story of Sal: A Critical Self-reflective Autoethnography Revealing Whiteness in the Classroom

umbrella of autoethnographic methods. Leggo (2012) posits that personal narrative is an alternative epistemology to traditional scientific, technological approaches. This concurs with Clandinin and Rosiek (2007), Elbaz-Luwisch (2007), Elliott (2005), McNiff (2007), and Webster and Mertova (2007), who assert that the aim of personal narrative is to discern meaning from moments and reveal layers of understanding from the otherwise tangled messiness of lived experience. Kroth and Cranton (2014) note the relationship between narrative and identity, stating, “There is a core self that is relatively constant over time. Yet, that self or aspects of that self may be challenged by other events and experience” (p.18). Merriweather (2015) agrees, noting the uniqueness of personal narrative as method to acknowledge self, discover self, and change self. Particular to teaching and learning contexts, Clough (2002) and Webster and Mertova (2007) opine that personal narrative as method offers researchers multiple perspectives of stories, shifting teachers by unsettling fixed knowledge and moving them towards holistic, open-ended understandings of phenomena. Kincheloe (2007) posits that critical teaching professionals will embrace open-endedness, appreciate ambiguity in educational practice, and interrogate politically contested spaces. In addition, critical reflection on individual’s stories interrogates how stories have been shaped, stored, reshaped, retold, and how these memories contribute to one’s personal growth.
Show more

19 Read more

Bourdieu and Critical Autoethnography:  Implications for Research, Writing, and Teaching

Bourdieu and Critical Autoethnography: Implications for Research, Writing, and Teaching

primarily on immigrants and refugees. However, France was a nation formed through efforts to assimilate the diverse regional populations (many of whom also spoke regional languages or dialects) within its territory. The tensions between rural and working-class families and teachers in France have long been shaped around some of the same issues that are now being raised regarding immigrant families (see Reed- Danahay & Anderson-Levitt, 1991). I became interested in stories written by people who grew up in a rural milieu as an anthropologist who had previously conducted fieldwork on education in rural France (Reed-Danahay, 1996). I was intrigued by the dialogue between my own ethnographic research (as an American woman and therefore an outsider who tried to understand what Malinowski called “the native point of view”) and the perspectives articulated by writers who were native to rural France but had also come to adopt a similar ethnographic stance of distance due to their having left that milieu. These authors began their lives as insiders, but had become familiar enough with the world beyond to develop the desire not only to write about their own life experiences for a broader audience but also to convey ethnographic details about the peasant milieu of their childhood. These writers, Pierre Jakèz-Hélias (1978) and Emilie Carles (1991), were autoethnographers. Their memoirs can be viewed as a form of indigenous ethnography that builds upon personal experience. Rather than being overly concerned with the “authenticity” of their narratives as ethnographic reportage, I was more interested in the social and cultural conventions and values regarding education in France that they conveyed. I was also interested in the variety of responses to the assimilationist ethos of the French nation as implemented through education that their texts revealed. I subsequently published three more essays (Reed- Danahay, 2002, 2005a, 2006) on the published autobiographies of people with rural French backgrounds.
Show more

11 Read more

Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom

Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom

Having highlighted what he takes to be the primary forms of academic plagiarism among students, Martin generated a taxonomy of “institutionalized plagiarism”—a list of what we might think of as at least occasionally acceptable forms of authorial behavior. The list includes ghostwriting: “when a politician, famous sports figure, business executive, or movie star gives a speech or writes a book or newspaper column, frequently the actual writing is done by someone else.” Martin noted also the phenomenon of “honorary authorship,” such as political speech writing, some comedy writing, and much bureaucratic writing. As Martin’s two lists demonstrate, the accusation of plagiarism is frequently the product of hierarchical relationships. When a student borrows a paper to turn in for a class, that’s plagiarism. When an academic borrows another teacher’s materials to produce a class lecture without citation, that’s scholarship (howev- er sloppy). When a supervisor takes credit for an underling’s work, that’s busi- ness. As Martin’s taxonomy makes clear enough, the designation of plagiarism has at least as much to do with where you reside in a power structure as it does with whether you did or did not present someone else’s text as your own. As Martin revealed, the practice of presenting someone else’s text as one’s own is widespread and unremarkable in a variety of corporate and academic contexts. At the same time as the plague of plagiarism has come to seem a surpassing educational problem, plagiarism has also gained prominence in our contem- porary shared culture. In addition to Vice President Biden and Doris Kearns Goodwin, historian Stephen Ambrose, presidential speech writer Timothy S. Goeglein, (Derringer, 2008), and the playwright Byrony Lavery have defended themselves against charges of plagiarism. But if a student who plagiarizes in a composition class can expect some actual punishment, most of these high- profile cases result in a lot of hand-wringing but no real consequences.
Show more

434 Read more

CHANGING TEACHERS` ATTITUDE TOWARDS WRITING, TEACHING OF WRITING AND ASSESSMENT OF WRITING

CHANGING TEACHERS` ATTITUDE TOWARDS WRITING, TEACHING OF WRITING AND ASSESSMENT OF WRITING

The aim of above described research was to announce that writing is complex process, during which attention must be lead to a lot of aspects, and that the process of writing consists of many components. It was important equally to declare that mastering all the aspects is a process that needs time. The skill of writing, as any other skill develops with the overall development of the child. The writer must pay attention to how to write down words and letters, how to compose sentences, how to grab the reader’s attention, how to place the text on the paper, what words to use to express ideas etc.
Show more

9 Read more

DRAMA AND WRITING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE USE OF DRAMA TO PROMOTE WRITING IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM.

DRAMA AND WRITING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE USE OF DRAMA TO PROMOTE WRITING IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM.

package that was passed around the circle. As they imagined what was in the package they became the characters to whom it belonged. Only two of these characters were chosen for further[r]

296 Read more

DRAMA AND WRITING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE USE OF DRAMA TO PROMOTE WRITING IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM.

DRAMA AND WRITING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE USE OF DRAMA TO PROMOTE WRITING IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM.

At the end, the two discourses mix (Have my people forsaken me?... I'm afraid, death skears me) as the writer returns to the more usual diary form. The same exploration of the boundari[r]

351 Read more

ICT in the Writing Classroom: The Pros and the Cons

ICT in the Writing Classroom: The Pros and the Cons

Students when encouraged to compose and post their contributions online could face the difficulty of finding proper ‘online’ anglophone spaces that offer no cultural barriers in anyway. Online spaces where students can find country- related content in English and people who share the same interests seem to be very limited. Our students might feel kind of ‘outsiders’ when contributing to foreign websites designed for specific nationals because they “need to understand expectations and norms of discourse communities” (McDonough, Shaw, & Masuhara, 2013, p. 197). Failing to do so could result in their contributions to be evaluated as inappropriate and even rejected by these communities (for example, when failing to avoid cultural prejudices and clichés in writing).
Show more

6 Read more

A Teaching Sandwich Approach to Integrating Classroom and Practical Teaching

A Teaching Sandwich Approach to Integrating Classroom and Practical Teaching

This study has highlighted the challenges and responses to a curriculum development programme which had the aim of instigating and managing change across a variety of departmental curricula, cultures and identities in order to create a single harmonised educational approach. The driver for change was student-centred and aspirational. The aim for our students across the faculty is that they graduate from their degree programmes with similar professional skills, similar understandings about engineering design, context and impact, some shared identity, while also having expertise in very different technical fields, as well as an identification with their own discipline. This work has highlighted how the implementation of this ambition plays out differently depending on the inherent culture and existing teaching practices of the department in question. At the outset of the change programme, formal and directional leadership was important; as the IEP has become embedded in the undergraduate department- based degree programmes, informal processes became more important. The challenge remaining is to ensure that there is balance between strong top-down leadership and distributed leadership consisting of a less formal directive process, so that the maintenance of harmonised curriculum standards across eight departments is inclusive and effective.
Show more

150 Read more

Writing for publication: Personal and editorial perspectives

Writing for publication: Personal and editorial perspectives

• Five years later we are still meeting • Rather than ‘finding’ time for writing activity, we actively schedule time • Engaging with a range of writing related activities has broadened o[r]

36 Read more

7. Classroom teaching strategies

7. Classroom teaching strategies

Just as important as the correct grouping of the students is the selection of an appropriate text. Text selection and the choice of an appropriate teaching focus or focuses should take about ten minutes prior to the session. Guided reading is primarily about building meaning. Guided reading is not a time to focus on word attack skills or large amounts of problem solving at the word level – this should occur during shared reading and the writing block. The text should refl ect the students’ experiences and interests and the students should be able to read the texts with their current range of strategies with scaffolding from the teacher. At the same time, the texts should contain suffi cient new challenges to further students’ learning as they read. Learning will only take place when the students are suffi ciently scaffolded so that they can go from the known to the unknown. Construction of the text meaning can be built as the session progresses. It is crucial that the text has a minimum of new learning so that the readers can problem-solve at the word and text level.
Show more

13 Read more

The Flipped Classroom: A Twist On Teaching

The Flipped Classroom: A Twist On Teaching

A common practice of teachers utilizing a flipped classroom is videos of the lectures. The videos are used in various ways. Teachers found that the use of short 10-15 minute videos is the best way to incorporate the videos. Resources have surfaced on the web of content information in a wide range of subject matter. Some websites provide premade videos, tutorials, and interfaces on the subject matter. The most successful flipped classrooms report that they utilize videos of the content that they have gotten from a variety of places. By obtaining videos from other sources the students indicate they are more engaged and found the information refreshing. Videos from the same person can become mundane and boring. Taking boring lectures and recording them and making students watch them on their own time is not the purpose of the flipped classroom. Voice-over PowerPoints are also mundane and boring. Students will disengage and are likely not going to watch them with their full attention. One means of making the videos is the use of simple “one take” videos (Brunsell & Horejsi, 2013). “To create these videos, all you need is an inexpensive digital camera, tripod, white panel board, and dry erase markers. Teachers outline their presentation with visual aids on a series of small whiteboards. Then, they simply record themselves talking through the series of whiteboards. The benefit of this approach is that videos can be created quickly; and by having the teacher on camera, students connect with both the content and their teacher.”
Show more

6 Read more

CONTEXTUAL TEACHING AND LEARNING APPROACH TO TEACHING WRITING

CONTEXTUAL TEACHING AND LEARNING APPROACH TO TEACHING WRITING

Transferring strategy was implemented when the students wrote their neat recount text by looking at the previous text. In this stage, the students said that the benefit from using transferring strategy was that they were able to know which parts were incorrect. Five teaching strategies had been implemented and discovered in this research. Besides that, the assessment should also be considered to know students’ improvement in writing. One of the characteristics of CTL approach is the use of authentic assessment. The students from the interview session argued that portfolio as the authentic assess- ment could be effective since they were able to combine their ideas, better their writing, and use past tense correctly.
Show more

13 Read more

TEACHING WRITING AT THE PRIMARY LEVELS

TEACHING WRITING AT THE PRIMARY LEVELS

production of texts “as a way of telling” (McCrimmon, 1994), a “rhetorical approach to composition” (Pennington, 2013, p. 2) that failed to highlight the importance of the crucial processes involved during writing. Significantly, the product approach that drew “insights of composition theory, cognitive psychology or traditional grammars (Matsuda, 2003)” (Hyland, 2007, p. 149) focussed on reading texts, “absorbing their content, and critiquing them” (Becker, 2006, p. 2). Consequently, the process approach was proposed in the 1980s as an alternative. In the early years of this approach, research such as Murray (1972) affirmed that for pupils to acquire the ability to write well, teachers must initiate pupils into the processes that writers go through because as Nunan (1991) explains “no text can be perfect”, certainly not at one go. However, the desire to improve this model of writing was never really sated with calls from researchers such as Sandmel and Graham (2011) who, through a meta-analysis of research on process writing, argued for the explicit teaching of writing processes to develop cognitive structures such as the tapping of pupils’ existing schema and content organisation of pupils’ understanding. Significant contribution from Flower and Hayes (1981) in terms of a cognitive model that provided “a clearer understanding of the key steps and thought patterns that occur throughout the writing process” sought to replace “traditional linear sequence models” that “describe various steps taken during writing” (Becker, 2006, p. 25).
Show more

10 Read more

USE OF VIRTUAL CLASSROOM SOFTWARE FOR TEACHING

USE OF VIRTUAL CLASSROOM SOFTWARE FOR TEACHING

For centuries, textbooks have been the most important teaching-learning tool in all types of schools. The physical format of the textbook does not easily allow students and teacher to depart from the prescribed path, or to link to new concepts and ideas from other disciplines. Whereas the virtual textbooks move the learners beyond content mastery to information seeking and problem solving skills. This enables the learner to evaluate and synthesize information from diverse sources and understand and apply the difference between facts and opinions, grasp multiple and diverse perspectives and draw insights from these and utilize these within the context of one‟s own knowledge base and experiences.
Show more

8 Read more

Writing The Ucas Personal Statement >>>CLICK HERE<<<

Writing The Ucas Personal Statement >>>CLICK HERE<<<

New York curriculum vitae europeu fazer online need someone to type my dissertation results on adoption please rguhs thesis topics in nursing Mid Glamorgan Writing the ucas personal statement Renfrewshire, Enderby how to purchase course work on cheating as soon as possible St. Paul 5 page research paper topics. Writing the ucas personal statement North Las Vegas. cover letter format university application mbbs admission 2014 in canada buy movie review on astronomy online do my creative writing on sexism for me, looking for someone to make thesis on cheating for me. Writing the ucas personal statement Raleigh District Of Columbia do movie review on astronomy online Saint-Eustache, make dissertation chapter on guns for 10, Commonwealth of Kentucky need essay on school dress code please, Kingston, Walsall Writing the ucas personal statement Fayetteville need someone to write my dissertation results on physical education online. edit thesis proposal on english as soon as possible Guam, Sacramento looking for someone to do dissertation on sex education.
Show more

5 Read more

The Complete Guide to Writing Personal Insurance with Chubb

The Complete Guide to Writing Personal Insurance with Chubb

Who do I contact at Chubb? Please call us 1-855-728-4DBU. Our Personal Lines Service Centre (PLSC) has a designated DBU team to efficiently set-up quotes, make changes and help with general inquiries. The PLSC is open until 7PM EST to serve our brokers who operate in Western Canada and for those who work late! When underwriting approval is required, you will be transferred to one of the Canadian DBU underwriters.

43 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...