Top PDF Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media

Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media

Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media

Although more commonly associated with informal and non-formal learning, networks offer flexibility, exposure, and the means to build social capital that war- rant more serious consideration for their adoption in formal education. There are important lessons to be drawn from modern uses of networks in the workplace. These applications retain the purposive and task-oriented functionality needed for organizations to succeed, while representing a shift in thinking away from traditionally constituted hierarchical departments and centres. The most widely known research related to networks in workplace contexts is the work of Etienne Wenger on what he refers to as communities of practice (COP). COPs usually con- sist of co-workers located in a common workplace that develop and share their skills as needed, thereby creating solutions to common problems. In the process of completing these tasks, they develop mutually defining identities, shared jargon, and “shared discourse reflecting a certain perspective on the world” (Wenger, 1998, p. 125). Learning networks, however, are not defined as much by a shared location or description of work, but rather by an individual’s need for task per- formance, learning, advice, or interpersonal support. The type of support or aid required causes the learning network to constantly morph its structure, rate of interaction among members, and communication tone in response to these tasks. A range of tools and environments support explicit group-oriented learning within a networked context, allowing groups to branch off from networks for specific learning purposes. For example, CoolSchool, presented primarily as a Facebook application, brings learners and teachers together through Facebook, providing a system for running real-time classes and requesting or offering a lesson, along with a scheduling subsystem.
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Exploring and Learning Suicidal Ideation Connotations on Social Media with Deep Learning

Exploring and Learning Suicidal Ideation Connotations on Social Media with Deep Learning

A suicide note analysis method for automated the identification of suicidal ideation was built using binary support vector machine classifiers by Desmet and Hoste (2013) using fine-grained emotion detection for classifier optimization with lexico-semantic features for optimization. In 2014, Huang et al. (2014) used rule-based methods with a hand-crafted unsupervised classification for developing a real-time suicidal ideation detection system deployed over Weibo 1 , a microblogging platform. By combining both machine learning and psychological knowledge, they reported an SVM classifier as having the best performance of different classifiers. Some semantic constructs are associated with lifetime suicidal ideation as com- pared to others. A cross-sectional study of suicidal intent in 220,848 Twitter users in their 20s in Japan (Sueki, 2015) concluded that language framing was important for identifying suicidal markers in the text. For example: want to suicide was found to be associated more frequently with a lifetime suicidal intent than want to die in similar sen- tences. Several of these studies emphasized the in- fluencing power of social media and internet in the study of suicide ideation. (Sawhney et al., 2018a) demonstrated the use of ensembles to approach the detection of suicidal mentions on social media.
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Social media in undergraduate learning: categories and characteristics

Social media in undergraduate learning: categories and characteristics

This study is framed within a social constructivist approach, since alignment between the affordances of social media and the premises of social constructivist learning theories (Dron & Anderson, 2014) are well established. As reflected in Anderson ’ s (2008) equivalency theorem, many thinkers connect deep learning to meaningful learning (for more information on educational interactions and social media, see Smith, 2016b). However, while there is much rigorous research on deep versus surface approaches to learning (e.g., Trigwell, Prosser, & Waterhouse, 1999), as Woo and Reeves (2007) aptly showed, the meaning of meaningful learning is neces- sarily relative in that it depends upon how we understand learning itself, as reflected in learning theories. This reinforces the importance of framing technological affor- dances for meaningful educational interactions, such as those presented via the core categories and characteristics of social media in this study, with explicit connections to how learning is understood and to research-informed theoretical groundings. Such links between research and practice can also build educators ’ and administrators ’ research-informed understandings of undergraduate perspectives and uses of social media in their university learning, with the ultimate goal of supporting evidence based decision-making in higher education policy and practice. The findings presented in this study reinforce a need for further research on learning and technology that en- gage and explain undergraduates ’ understanding of meaning making explicitly, includ- ing the particular ways in which social-technological interactions via social media and other emerging educational technologies inform and reflect meaning making pro- cesses in undergraduate learning.
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Exploring the use of social media tools among students for teaching and learning purpose

Exploring the use of social media tools among students for teaching and learning purpose

The uses of social media among students in universities and colleges have been a topic of great discussion among researchers throughout the world. Many studies discovered that social media influence the effectiveness of learning and teaching in general [18]. Social media demonstrated in many studies have discovered a positive impact on learning and teaching foreign language as they can enhance and improve students’ written and oral language skills [19]. Kabilan et al. [11] found that university students consider Facebook as a useful and meaningful online environment that can support and improve their learning of English. Social media technologies have several advantages such as create new methods of interaction, collaboration, improving learning motivation, enhancing relationship, ability to share and create content, developing collaborative abilities and offering personalize course material [20, 21]. With this characteristics, social media are recognized as important tools for reshaping the learning and educational environment.
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Taking social media to a university classroom: teaching and learning using Twitter and blogs

Taking social media to a university classroom: teaching and learning using Twitter and blogs

Although the majority participated extensively, findings show that some students (a small proportion though) were not active on Twitter and rarely commented on blogs. Results show that students pay for Internet services at MZUNI which they access only via computers available in the University Library and some computer laboratories. Even if they have smartphones as reported earlier in this paper, they have to buy inter- net data (commonly called Internet bundles) to surf the Internet. Findings show further that students cannot access University Internet via their mobile devices – Wi-Fi is not accessible by students. This is the reason results presented in Table 5 show that 39 (60.9%) students mentioned lack of money to buy data bundles which are purchased from Mobiles Network Service providers. Inaccessible Wi-Fi also contributed to 38 (59.4%) students to indicate that they were not able to access the University Internet. It is encouraging however, that most students have positive attitudes towards using both, blogs and Twitter because according to the findings, only 3 (4.7%) said they do not like social media implying that the majority of students are ready to use these technologies as long as lecturers are willing to incorporate them into educational activities. The find- ings echo views by Barczyk and Duncan (2011:275) who claim that “many students already understand its [social media] power and breadth and would likely embrace so- cial networking technology as a learning tool”. But how willing are lecturers to adopt these technologies for education purposes considering the fact that prior studies by a trio of researchers (Jacquemin et al., 2014) have shown similar results like mine that students have accepted these technologies more readily than their lecturers attributing the disparity to generational age gap? This is perhaps the reason Veletsianos (2012) suggests that there is need to test the age gap and incorporation of these technologies in a classroom before embarking on a full scale implementation into academic class structures.
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Social Media Usage and its Effects on the Teaching Learning Process in Secondary Schools in Nyamira North, Nyamira County, Kenya

Social Media Usage and its Effects on the Teaching Learning Process in Secondary Schools in Nyamira North, Nyamira County, Kenya

2.3 Effects of the usage of Social Media on the Teaching Learning process The Research on “The State of Social Media in Kenya,” reported that Kenyans‟ Social media use was accelerated by the 2013 general elections; where the electorate took to the SNS to express their political feelings (Venture Africa, 2014). The report argues that social media marketing should be a strategy in every company or organization that wants to sell its products anywhere in the world. With social media sites like Facebook, twitter, linkedin, Google+ among others, one can easily identify the target market and push adverts directly at them. This brings the questions on how schools are using these sites in marketing and other management practices. Schools and other educational institutions are using them to interact with their communities, and these are influencing the whole process of teaching and learning. Teachers are also using them to access the best latest pedagogies to apply them in their classroom instruction.
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Social Media Classification Scheme in Online Teaching and Learning Activities: A Consideration for Educators

Social Media Classification Scheme in Online Teaching and Learning Activities: A Consideration for Educators

The fourth characteristic that social media sites have to offer is the development of learning Communities. Social media sites allow users to form communities and subcommunities. Kietzmann, Hermkens & McCarthy (2011) say that the more social a social network becomes, the bigger the community of friends, followers, and contacts is. The social group or community like other communities in real world is founded on the fact that the members in the group or community have common beliefs, interests, or hobbies, and the members follow the same principles of the network. The site owner can categorize members into different groups like buddies, followers, classes, or majors. The owner manages the groups or the community and sends the invitation to the members in the same group to let them join the community. Since the people with the same interests and hobbies are grouped together, they have more ideas to contribute to the group discussions and the group environment is very friendly and sympathetic. Duffy & McDonald (2011) mention that Facebook offers the teacher and the students a good opportunity to create groups and to increase relationships with online friends. The teacher can use this characteristic of social media sites in teaching and learning activities. The sites that can be used to create groups in teaching and learning activities are WordPress, PBworks, Facebook,World of Warcraft, and Second Life.
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Exploring the role of social media in collaborative learning the new domain of learning

Exploring the role of social media in collaborative learning the new domain of learning

Social networking sites and social media are closely similar, which provide a platform where students can interact, communicate, and share emotional intelligence and look- ing for people with other attitudes (Gikas & Grant, 2013). Facebook and YouTube channel use also increased in the skills/ability and knowledge and outcomes (Daniel, Isaac, & Janet, 2017). It was highlighted that 90% of faculty members were using some sort of social media in their courses/ teaching. Facebook was the most visited social media sites as per study, 40% of faculty members requested students to read and views content posted on social media; majority reports that videos, wiki, etc. the primary source of acquiring knowledge, social networking sites valuable tool/source of collab- orative learning (Moran et al., 2011). However, more interestingly, in a study which was carried out on 658 faculty members in the eight different state university of Turkey, concluded that nearly half of the faculty member has some social media accounts.
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Inequalities of Professional Learning on Social Media Platforms

Inequalities of Professional Learning on Social Media Platforms

The geographic distribution of group mem- bers may reflect Sweden overall, but this may mask inequalities on local levels such as the differences within schools and between schools and teachers in the same municipal- ity or school forms. In an interview with the group’s moderator, she expressed that what characterized the group of teachers was, “this need for professional development we have, for further learning, but always on our own terms and as a part of our everyday work, not because someone says, ‘this is what every- one should do now’”. The grassroots-driven, but also individually and self-regulated pop- ulation of teachers gathered around a shared pedagogical theme forming a shared space that fit well with the logic of social media platforms. In particular, activity in the group followed the model of constant engagement, but also took advantage of the intermediary function and ‘free use’ of the digital platform that are such key aspects of the business model of platform capitalism (Srnicek 2016). With platform capitalism, platforms like Fa- cebook elicit social interaction and encour- age users to engage in activity such as press- ing like buttons and sharing photos to pro- mote further activity and data production. While internet platform industries make use of teachers’ labour and data production, put- ting them in a constant loop of desirable en- gagement and feedback from algorithmic powers in much the same way they do with any other user, there are particular concerns in relation to inequalities of professional
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Two Formulas for Success in Social Media: Social Learning and Network Effects

Two Formulas for Success in Social Media: Social Learning and Network Effects

In this study, we differentiate between social learning and network effects for social media content consumption, especially in the context of YouTube, the largest online video sharing website. Selecting online videos to watch is one of the most common choices viewers make every day. According to ComScore, the average user spend about 43 minutes watching online videos in June 2013, and Google websites (primarily YouTube) account for approximately 40% of that time, about 17 minutes. 1 According to YouTube statistics, 100 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute. What these numbers mean is that, given the vast reservoir of online videos, choosing videos to watch can become a complicated issue. On the one hand, consumers receive various information from friends and infer video quality through social learning. On the other hand, frequent social sharing creates direct or indirect network effects where a video becomes a fad. For example, when a video goes viral, users have strong incentives to watch it so they have something to discuss in social encounters.
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A review on use of social media in teaching and learning

A review on use of social media in teaching and learning

This goal of this review paper are to identify the use of online learning thtough social media and the positive impact it gives toward learner in education setting. The following key words were used to search for related literature that have similar purpose with the present study: social media, online learning, learning environments, online education, and educational tools. We search the articles that were published from 2010 until present by using these databases: Science Direct, EdITLib, and Ebscohost. The criteria set for those article are each of the articles study the use of social media, pros and cons and the challenge that educators might faced when implementing in academic setting. Therefore, those article were believe suitable to the study following the criteria above, eventhough the search hit more than that. The result are presented in Table 2.
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Social media for learning : a framework to inspire innovation

Social media for learning : a framework to inspire innovation

The professional networking tool LinkedIn provides a good illustration of this. For example: Encourage students to establish a LinkedIn presence for their employability. But it is also worth thinking about the concept of life blogging: the act of systematically recording everything you do, see or think as a way of developing capabilities as a reflective and critical thinker. This latter activity is extreme and ultimately obsessive sounding when intentional, but increasingly many of us leave traces of our actions, views and thoughts in myriad places. We all need to learn to manage our digital presence wisely and one way of learning to do this is to establish one’s professional self methodically by using techniques like academic blogging for intelligent, reflective thinking. Reflective blogging assignments, therefore, demonstrate an important academic use of social media.
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Social media, Collaboration and Social Learning … a Case‑study of Foreign Language Learning

Social media, Collaboration and Social Learning … a Case‑study of Foreign Language Learning

Following Vygotsky (1978), we assume that collaborative learning, knowledge sharing, problem-solving and empirically based materials will assist learners in their efforts towards acquiring foreign languages and developing a broader understanding of culture. Hermansen (2005) argues that learning is accepting constant change and that learning may be a “painful” process. Acquiring a foreign language is a particularly long process which involves interaction with peers and professors, constant feedback and feed-forward towards the next learning objective. However, social media based platforms may make learning more ludic and thus enable more learners to take in the information that may change their present cognitive status into a new, reflection- based type of knowledge that may be applied in new situations (Benson, 2008; Doolan, 2007; Duffy, 2007; Mondahl, Rasmussen, et al., 2009; Mondahl, Razmerita, & Rasmussen, 2009). The project outlined focuses on an interplay between foreign language learning and Web 2.0 applications integrated in a collaborative learning platform. Based on social constructivist considerations, we would argue that new learning and teaching strategies may be designed using Web 2.0 tools (Doolan, 2007; Duffy, 2007; Mondahl, Rasmussen, et al., 2009; Mondahl, Razmerita, et al., 2009). However, in order to design new learning platforms that enhance the learning experience, educators must plan and conceptualize the pedagogical principles, the associated tools and the strategy that enable them to test their assumptions according to specific learning objectives (Mondahl, Razmerita, et al., 2009).
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SOCIAL MEDIA FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

SOCIAL MEDIA FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

We began our work to explore the use of social media in higher education because we wanted to understand how these new technologies were impacting the lives of faculty - their personal lives, their professional development and their teaching. We began in 2010 with a sample of about 900 Pearson customers. We did not create a report this first year, but simply presented the research at national conferences and shared the presentation over SlideShare (http://www.slideshare.net/PearsonLearningSolutions/pearson- socialmediasurvey2010). At last count, this SlideShare presentation has had almost 39,000 views and press coverage in 2010 and in following years has been significant and widespread from Inside Higher Education and The Chronicle of Higher Education to the New York Times and USA Today. In 2011, we built out a representative United States faculty sample including part and full time educators from all types of institutions in all Carnegie classifications. We produced a report for the first time, sharing more details about the work. In 2012 we added a live professional development event where we released the findings of the survey and brought in educators to share their best practices for using social media for teaching and learning. This year, we had over 8,000 faculty respond to the survey. We also added a series of case studies on best practices within specific disciplines and courses from individual faculty we discovered through our 2012 survey results.
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The Use of Social Media for Blended Learning in Tertiary Education

The Use of Social Media for Blended Learning in Tertiary Education

As shown in Table 3, the means of survey questions in Class A were in general higher than those of survey questions in Class B. The grand means of all questions in Class A and Class B were 4.81 and 4.14 respectively. This might indicate that the teacher of Class A used Twitter more skillfully than that of Class B. Learning environment is getting more challenging. Bates [5] stated that “good teaching may overcome a poor choice in the use of technology, but technology will never save poor teaching; usually it makes it worse” (p. 8). To implement social media in the educational context teachers’ opinions and perceptions are important. The roles of teachers have changed. Teachers are now changing to act as facilitators to enhance student-centered learning approach. By using student-centered learning approach, students are motivated to learn and collaborate with others through the application of technologies. This approach provides learners with greater autonomy for learning [15]. Teachers are suggested to use social media tools to mediate interactions and share educational resources with students as well as to increase the participation of students in learning activities. In doing so, teachers will be able to lead students in collaborative knowledge construction and collect feedbacks from students.
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Crowdsourcing Social Media For Robot Learning: A Review

Crowdsourcing Social Media For Robot Learning: A Review

Abstract: Methods designed to render capability of robots to learn on their own is a heavily studied area. If robots are to become a constitutional part of our society, they must own the power to learn without direct guidance from a devoted user. Robot possessor never enjoyed the obligation of teaching their robot everything they know. The ability of a robot to use various resources in its environment will help its learning capabilities to be self-guided as well as independent. We investigate the use of social media crowdsourcing to allow a bot to access the huge information volume in gathering resources that are available on Twitter page. In distinction from others, the robot will gather or record the basic human actions that are performed physically and are then upload that video on the Twitter account. It will now ask for the descriptions of those performed actions. Parameters of those recorded actions are used as input into a MC-SVM (Multi-class Support Vector Machine) classification algorithm which will enable the capability of robot to recognize the similar action in future.
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Learning to Learn Sales Prediction with Social Media Sentiment

Learning to Learn Sales Prediction with Social Media Sentiment

Differently from the previous work, in this paper, we study the sales of seven smartphones in China’s market such as Samsung, Gionee, Huawei, Oppo, Vivo, Meizu, and iPhone. We show the importance of sentiment features by incorporat- ing sentiment information – extracted from the biggest Chi- nese social media platform Weibo – for improving sales pre- diction. To extract reliable sentiment index from Weibo, we build an accurate sentiment analyzer by applying the state-of- the-art pre-trained model BERT: Bidirectional Encoder Rep- resentation from Transformer [Devlin et al., 2018]. More- over, we report the sales prediction results of several statis- tical models and show the usefulness of sentiment features. Most importantly, we propose a viable way to alleviate the scarceness of sales data by using meta-learning. This tech- nique allows a non-parametric model such as neural networks to leverage historical sales of other brands, and use them as the prior knowledge. The intuition of applying meta-learning is that it optimizes the model for fast adaptability, allowing it to adapt to new prediction tasks.
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University Students’ Perceptions of Social Media as a Learning Tool

University Students’ Perceptions of Social Media as a Learning Tool

The questionnaire was divided into four parts. In the first part, students were requested to respond to gen- eral and demographic questions about their gender, age, and field of specialization. Students were also asked about their level of association with the Internet and social me- dia use. The second part provided more specific questions on the types of social media students’ use, the purpose for which they use social media, availability of social media platforms at the university, and their preference on the integration of social media in learning. The third part ad- dressed questions related to students’ perspectives on the benefits of social media use in learning. While the fourth part focused on their views on the negative aspects related to social media use in learning.
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Learning Invariant Representations of Social Media Users

Learning Invariant Representations of Social Media Users

The evolution of social media users’ behav- ior over time complicates user-level compar- ison tasks such as verification, classification, clustering, and ranking. As a result, na¨ıve ap- proaches may fail to generalize to new users or even to future observations of previously known users. In this paper, we propose a novel procedure to learn a mapping from short episodes of user activity on social media to a vector space in which the distance between points captures the similarity of the corre- sponding users’ invariant features. We fit the model by optimizing a surrogate metric learn- ing objective over a large corpus of unlabeled social media content. Once learned, the map- ping may be applied to users not seen at train- ing time and enables efficient comparisons of users in the resulting vector space. We present a comprehensive evaluation to validate the benefits of the proposed approach using data from Reddit, Twitter, and Wikipedia.
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Learning from Bullying Traces in Social Media

Learning from Bullying Traces in Social Media

the concerted efforts of parents, educators, and law enforcement. To guide these efforts it is paramount to study the dynamics of bullying. Such study criti- cally depends on text in the form of self-report social study surveys and electronic communication among participants. Such text is often fragmental, noisy, and covers only part of a bullying episode from a specific role’s perspective. As such, the NLP com- munity can help answer a host of scientific ques- tions: Which pieces of text refer to the same under- lying bullying episode? What is the form, reason, location, time, etc. of a bullying episode? Who are the participants of each episode, and what are their roles? How does a person’s role evolve over time? This paper presents our initial investigation on some of these questions, while leaving others to future re- search by the NLP community.
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