Top PDF Teaching Turkish Language and Literature: What Teachers Think?

Teaching Turkish Language and Literature: What Teachers Think?

Teaching Turkish Language and Literature: What Teachers Think?

While it is known that assessment studies that are carried out by individuals, who work in practicing programs, are more effective than the ones that are carried out by other various institutions (Fitzpatrick et al., [22]), it is pointed out that qualified approaches, questions directed to students, teachers and other shareholders are important in effective program assessment studies (Burke-Sinclair, [8]). In the meantime, it can be expected mostly from teachers to observe students' differences and cultural changes in program assessment studies carried out for education activities (Pritchard and Marshall, [61]). In this regard, it can be expected from empiric designs that are used by teachers as a leader, to provide important feedback for renewed programs (Stufflebeam [75]; Erden, [23]; Sandholtz, [63], Ringstaff and Dwyer, 1997, p. 51; Schneider, Brief and Guzzo, [64]). The difficulties encountered in transferring acquisitions that the program foresees in courses are noticed by field teachers firstly and they tried to establish solutions directed towards the program. Continuation of Turkish language and literature teaching within system integrity is in direct proportion to how the effective services associated with teaching are offered. Group studies are organized under 16 articles in Ministry of Education regions and education commission instructions and they are necessitated to make it possible to discuss the thoughts about program and its operation in teaching studies. Teacher commission meetings are among important activities that make it possible to make common decisions in order to strengthen relation among Turkish language and literature teachers and to catch the success in education studies. For this purpose, program assessment studies are conducted through feedback chain about program in a vertical mobility. These assessment studies are discussed by school literature teachers in school meetings and discussed in district course meetings via school course president and in province course meetings via district
Show more

11 Read more

Teacher cognition in language teaching: A review of research on what language teachers think, know, believe, and do

Teacher cognition in language teaching: A review of research on what language teachers think, know, believe, and do

terminology − another issue widely debated in the literature without any reference to teachers’ actual practices and cognitions − was investigated in more detail in Borg (1999d). A comparison of the role of terminology in the work of four teachers highlighted both variety in their practices as well as personalised stances towards the use of terminology shaped by their unique educational biographies. The teachers’ decisions about terminology were not related directly to beliefs they held about one particular issue; rather, once again, instructional decisions in this aspect of L2 teaching were influenced by the interaction of a range of cognitions, such as beliefs about the best way to learn grammar, about the value of talk about language, and about students’ knowledge of and experience of terminology. This study also provided some support for the possibility (supporting an earlier finding by Brumfit et al. 1996) that teachers’ own knowledge of terminology was a factor shaping their instructional decisions. These connections between what teachers know about grammar and their approach to formal instruction were explored further in Borg (2001), where two experienced EFL teachers were compared. One teacher was generally confident in his own knowledge about grammar, and this was reflected in his willingness to conduct impromptu grammar work and to use students’ questions as the springboard for unplanned class discussions of grammar. The second teacher rarely conducted grammar work and never did so unless he was prepared. A fear of not knowing the answer, triggered by a negative experience much earlier in his career, was the main influence behind this stance. These data suggested that teachers’ self-perceptions of their knowledge of grammar can motivate their pedagogical decisions.
Show more

30 Read more

Qualities of an effective teacher: what do medical teachers think?

Qualities of an effective teacher: what do medical teachers think?

Although many authors have published their personal opinions of characteristics of an effective teacher, fewer studies have used feedback from teachers themselves as compared to students’ ratings to define an effective teacher [13,16,17]. Sutkin et al. [5] in their literature review to identify specific characteristics of good medical teachers noted that these “characteristics were usually based on either the results of a survey of students/ residents or the values or practical wisdom of the author (s).” Interdisciplinary studies of teacher effectiveness are further scarce [13]. Furthermore there is no agreement on evaluation of medical teacher effectiveness [18,19]. Most of the studies regarding teachers’ perceptions of ef- fective teacher are either focussed on a specific subgroup of the medical profession like clinical skills lab [16] or surgical education [20], or have been done in non- medical or allied medical fields such as language [21], agriculture [22], business [23], nursing [24] and phar- macy [13]. Terese Stenfors-Hayes et al. [25] have said, “Most studies so far within this field have focused on teaching per se, whilst few focus on being a teacher”.
Show more

7 Read more

What do prospective teachers think about educational gamification?

What do prospective teachers think about educational gamification?

The influence of the “information era” and the quest for innovation and quality in education lead to the integration of new technological tools and practices. One of the popular terms in education is “gamification.” In the literature, this term has been defined differently. Deterding et al. (2011) defined gamification as the use of game design elements in non-game contexts. EduTrends (2016) defined it as the application of game principles and elements in a learning environment to influence students’ behavior, increase their motivation, and drive participation. Zichermann and Cunnigham (2011) defined gamification as the process of game-thinking and game mechanics to engage users and solve problems. According to these definitions, four components characterize the gamification concept: Game elements, design, context, and player.
Show more

10 Read more

What can EFL teachers learn from immersion language teaching?

What can EFL teachers learn from immersion language teaching?

This technique can be thought as paralleling the questioning downward technique mentioned above. In the previous example, the focus has been on conceptual understanding without focusing on whether vocabulary items or particular structures might be the cause of lack of understanding. (Note the last sentence suggests that the perspective is the teachers’, that is, it is the teachers who decide that it might be a word, a phrase or a particular structure that might have presented a problem to their students, reflecting teachers’ thinking at any particular moment of the lesson.) Rephrasing therefore requires active thought on the part of the teachers as they evaluate the classroom situation and make decisions about whether they should focus on linguistics items or on content in order to further students’ understanding of the topic of the lesson.
Show more

7 Read more

Literature and Language Teaching

Literature and Language Teaching

There are some factors which play crucial role in encourage the students to experience literary experience while reading apiece of literature. The first factor is the choice of literary text. There are some suggestions given by Arthur concerning the choice of the text. Teachers should not select a text which involves many new and difficult vocabulary items and grammatical structures. This will discourage the students because they can not make sense of the piece of literature especially in EFL settings in which the proficiency level of the students may not be high enough to analyze and make sense of difficult vocabulary and grammatical structures. New and unfamiliar cultural assumptions should also be avoided specially in the earliest stages of language learning. There are some stories which are common to all countries and cultures. The teachers can select those stories or can translate the popular stories in students’ native culture if students have the same L1. But literary value of story should be kept during the translation process. Another factor which contributes to the literary experience is non – verbal accompaniment embedded in the text. These non – verbal clues include pictures (even for adults), sound effect especially for children and teacher’ tone of voice.
Show more

8 Read more

The Evaluation of World Literature Courses in Turkish Language Teaching Departments Based on Conceptual Field

The Evaluation of World Literature Courses in Turkish Language Teaching Departments Based on Conceptual Field

In this study, World Literature course that are given in Turkish Language Teaching Departments of the universities in Turkey have been evaluated within the scope of "World Literature" that was used by Goethe in the 1820s and developed afterwards. With the purpose of conducting this evaluation, course contents of World Literature of Turkish Language Education Departments in Turkey and European Credit Transfer System forms have been obtained, and these contents have been examined within the context of the conceptual field that is pointed out by the definition. In this study where document analysis was used among the qualitative research methods, the data have been evaluated under the headings of "learning outcomes" and "course flow chart" based on multiculturalism, multidiscipline and multitime which are the key words of world literature. The first remarkable point is tackling the topic of Turkish literature as a world literature sub-unit that is independent from East and West. Considering the axis of the study, it is observed that the Turkish language teaching programs focus on the relationship between written work and writer within the scope of multiculturalism in world literature teaching course. These written works exceed beyond the culture elements they belong to, and they are worldwide famous and generally novels.
Show more

9 Read more

Analysis of Prospective Turkish Language and Literature Teachers' Self efficacy Perceptions on Critical Reading

Analysis of Prospective Turkish Language and Literature Teachers' Self efficacy Perceptions on Critical Reading

As is the case for every business, reading & writing also has a scientific ground. This science is required not only to comprehend and evaluate the knowledge and message conveyed by the text authors accurately but also essential to protect the readers from the sinister traps of information age, which could only be detected by a few masterminds. The type of ignorance and vulgarity defined as “Ignorance of information” is the kind of knowledge lack gained by excessive reading without any purpose and adopting excessive amounts of information... Any reader with no critical reading skill may fall into the trap of information ignorance the more s/he reads [6]. That being the case “critical reading is thinking about a text to be read, brainstorming on the rights and wrongs and interpreting the subject matter; critical reading is testing and evaluating the read subject based on personal knowledge background; critical reading is an individual's justifying, questioning and analyzing what is read before reaching a conclusion by utilizing reliable sources and his/her intellect; it means activating a communicative interaction. To put this differently it refers to the acquisition of receptive skills of the message conveyed by the author” [24]; [22]; [26]; [25].
Show more

9 Read more

Identifying Motivational Factors of Pre-service EFL Teachers

Identifying Motivational Factors of Pre-service EFL Teachers

The Turkish (the participants’ first language) version of The FIT-Choice/motivation scale (Kılınç et al., 2012) was adapted to gather the data. The scale consists of three parts consisting several items under some subscales describing different motivational factors. These are the “intrinsic values” (pre-service’ teachers’ interest in and desire to teach), “personal utility values” (reasons related to job security, time for family, job transferability), “social utility values” (pre-service’ teachers’ desire to shape future of children/adolescents, make social contribution, enhance social equity, work with children/adolescents), “self perceptions of their abilities”( pre-service’ teachers’ perceptions of their teaching abilities), “fallback career choice” (pre-service’ teachers’ selection of teaching as a career because they have not been accepted into their first choices), “social influences” (teaching and learning experiences, peers’ or parents’ influence on their decisions) subscales (Watt and Richardson, 2007). The reliability and validity test was employed for each section of the scale. The reliability test results for each part are as follows: Part A has .769 , Part B .934 and Part C .761 Cronbach alpha values ( see Table 1).
Show more

5 Read more

Dogme ELT: What do teachers and students think?

Dogme ELT: What do teachers and students think?

they could find the resources and use them in order to escape from a deserted island. The Dogme ELT lesson idea taken from the book Teaching Unplugged (Meddings & Thornbury, 2009) by the second teacher (T2) is called "Space Travellers" (p. 32). This experimental lesson aimed to get students to talk about provocative statements, such as "I like Mondays", "Homework is a waste of time", "TV is bad for you" and "Britney Spears is wonderful". The teacher wrote "Agree, Disagree and Not sure" on different parts of the wall and told students that these represent three positions they can take. Each student stood up and moved to the appropriate part on the wall. After talking to the students in their groups, they explained the position they chose to the whole class. During these activities, the teacher noted on the board examples of emerging language including words or structures that caused problems and any new phrases she added to the conversation. The emerging language includes structures or vocabulary, such as "not only...but also", "if it did not exist, ...would...", "I am used to...", "what if...", "neither have I", "it determines whether...", "it is up to you", "advertisement", "...more innovative", "studious", "in terms of", "in her early twenties", "wear make-up", "wealthy". The teacher discussed the language on the board and checked meaning. Finally, she substituted Friday for Monday and the internet for TV, and asked students to move again and justify their positions.
Show more

12 Read more

Teaching case suffixes with the aid of the usage of Turkish folk literature in teaching Turkish to the foreign students

Teaching case suffixes with the aid of the usage of Turkish folk literature in teaching Turkish to the foreign students

When the folkloric literature was taken into account, the products of it are known as; the some of them as unknown producers, giving advice conditionally, making the people think conditionally, entertaining conditionally, or reminding like those mentioned utterances or phrase of utterances. First and foremost, rhymes with counting numbers, tongue twisters, children songs and riddles are coming to the mind. We believe to remind herein; the children songs taking place in the folkloric literature are still open to question whether it should take place in the literature or not? but the researcher used the children songs due to their teachability.
Show more

15 Read more

ADEQUACY OF READING COMPREHENSION OF TURKISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS WORKING IN GAZIANTEP IN THE SOUTHEAST ANATOLIAN REGION

ADEQUACY OF READING COMPREHENSION OF TURKISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS WORKING IN GAZIANTEP IN THE SOUTHEAST ANATOLIAN REGION

turkey participated in pisa (the program for international student assessment) exams organized by OECD to see its weak and strong sides comparatively. The results of these exams targeting secondary school students aged 15 years old indicate the extent to which objectives set by teaching programs have been achieved. in addition to providing an opportunity for tur- key to compare itself with the other oecd countries, the exam makes it possible for turkey to compare itself with the countries in its region. totally 4996 students participated in pisa exams in 2009 (pisa 2009 national preliminary report 2010 p. 14). according to data given in the National Preliminary Report (2010), totally 442 students (8.8%) from 17 schools in Adıyaman, Diyarbakır, Gaziantep, Mardin, Siirt, Şanlıurfa and Şırnak in Southeast Anatolian Region par- ticipated in pisa 2009 exams. this geographic region took the lowest score for combined reading performance which is slightly over 400 points and occupied the last position among the cities in Turkey. West Anatolian Region took the first place with a mean combined reading per- formance score slightly lower than 500 points (pisa 2009 national preliminary report 2010 p. 43). pisa results are parallel to the results of university entrance exam. the mean scores taken by all of the regions of turkey are below the international mean score. east anatolian and southeast anatolian regions showed worse performance (berberoglu & Kalender 2005, 31)
Show more

13 Read more

Certain Basic Concepts of Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language

Certain Basic Concepts of Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language

The concept of language acquisition was mostly tackled within the concept of mother tongue. However, nowadays it has become a concept field that is tackled independently, and studies are conducted about this subject. The concept of language acquisition has also been included in the literature within the scope of foreign language acquisition as well as the scope of mother tongue acquisition. Language acquisition means the individual's acquiring the language rules, vocal properties and words spontaneously since birth. Language acquisition starts in a natural process spontaneously. It takes place with the vicinity of language that is closely contacted by the individual. Language acquisition is completed to a great extent until the school age period. After school age, it still continues relatively on a low level but systematically. Foreign language acquisition emerges when people acquire any other language as well as the native language.
Show more

12 Read more

Approaches employed by teachers in teaching the English literature component

Approaches employed by teachers in teaching the English literature component

brainstorming sessions), 7 (get my students to write about their feelings/reactions towards an issue) and 8 (set journal writing). In relation to language based activities, teacher reported that they applied language based activities at medium level (mean 2.81). Teacher ranked statement language based activities number 9 (set group work) as the highest mean score followed by statement number 10 (conduct performance activities (e.g. drama, role play, poetry recital), 11 (conduct performance activities (e.g. drama, role play, poetry recital) and 12 (hold debates for my students). Looking at the use of paraphrastic activities in teaching literature, teacher perceived that the use the activities at medium level (mean 3.16). Teacher rated paraphrastic activity in term of ‘re-telling the story to my students (number 13)’ as the most popular one, and the second most popular was ‘getting my students to read paraphrased notes in the workbook / handouts (statement 14)’ and then statement 15 (Encourage my students to re-tell the story to the class) while statement 16 (Translate a text using LI (BM / Chinese / Kadazan) was use at lower frequency. Teachers employed moral-philosophical activities at medium level (mean 3.13). In more detail, teacher rated activities of more- philosophical in term of statement number 17 (setting discussions on moral dilemmas) at highest level, followed by statement number 18 (conduct reflective sessions), number 19 (tell moral values to my students) and number 20 (conduct self-evaluation activities). The use of stylistics activities in overall in teaching literature was at medium level (mean 3.26). Statement 21 (discuss different meaning of a text) from the text that are significant to their reading) was rated as the highest mean score, followed by statement 22 (ask my students to identify linguistic features (e.g. vocabulary, tenses) in a poem / short story / novel.), 23 (get my students to identify adjective that describe a character) and 24 (get my students to extract examples from a text that describe the setting).
Show more

17 Read more

Evaluation of the Grammar Teaching Process by Using the Methods Used in Turkish Language Teaching as a Foreign Language: A Case Study

Evaluation of the Grammar Teaching Process by Using the Methods Used in Turkish Language Teaching as a Foreign Language: A Case Study

Abstract The preferred methods for the success of foreign language teaching and the reflection of these methods on the teaching process are very important. Since approaches and methods in language teaching enable the teacher to use different techniques in his/ her lectures, they provide a more effective teaching process. The methodology in teaching the Turkish language as a foreign language is generally discussed for the development of language skills, and there is not enough emphasis on which methods are used and how they are reflected in the linguistic teaching process. In teaching grammar, some aspects are adopted such as learning the rules and structures directly, following a specific order and transferring them, intimidating those rules by integrating with language skills and even ignoring teaching the grammar. The starting point of the study is to determine the reflection of these perspectives upon the teaching of grammar and to investigate which methods are used in the teaching of grammar. The purpose of the study is to determine the methods and techniques which the teacher uses by teaching grammar through teaching the Turkish language as a foreign language. In this way, the process of teaching grammar will be assessed by taking into account the beliefs and views of teachers. In this study, the case study among qualitative research patterns will be used. The lecturers who work in Turkish Language Teaching Centers in various universities and the volunteers to participate in the study will build up the study group. The data will be collected using the interview technique and the resulting data obtained will be analyzed through the content analysis. As a result of the study, suggestions will be brought up from the perspectives of teachers, from the methods they use and from the applications of what they do. Hence, it is hoped that awareness can be raised in the design of a grammar teaching process.
Show more

11 Read more

Grammatical metaphor: Nominalization in the 6th and 7th grade Turkish classrooms

Grammatical metaphor: Nominalization in the 6th and 7th grade Turkish classrooms

The principal objective of the present study was to examine ideational grammatical metaphors in the form of nominalization and in particular their respective frequencies and also types. Thus, we tried to explore the knowledge building in Turkish classes and also tried to determine how much academic content was accessible to students. In response to our research question, the analysis of teachers’ academic discourse patterns indicated that in terms of raw numbers, when teaching in the 7th grade teachers used slightly more nominalizations than when they were teaching in the 6th grade. Similarly, students in the 7th grade (Age 12) also usednominalization structures a little more than their counterparts in the 6th grade (age 11). Although, statistically not significant, the findings may suggest that there is a slight rise in the use of nominalization as the level of the class increases. This finding confirms Halliday's (2004, p. 32) claim that language development that he calls “semiotic maturation”, in particular the move from congruent to metaphorical takes place between the ages of 9 to 13.
Show more

8 Read more

Perceptions of prospective Turkish Teachers regarding Literature Circles

Perceptions of prospective Turkish Teachers regarding Literature Circles

Ministry In parallel with the developments in science and technology, education curriculums started to seek a renewal and claim to bring the practices and methods that can meet the demands of the modern age into education environments. In addition to the basic methods of traditional education, which are expression and question-answer techniques, a rich learning environment is being developed in a wide technical range from brainstorming to buzz groups, six thinking hats technique to Socrates technique, Philipps 66 to station technique. It is essential to use the above-mentioned methods and techniques in teaching Turkish, which is based on developing comprehension and speaking skills, in terms of the development of communication, cooperation and critical thinking skills that are among the skills of the twenty-first century. One of the techniques that can develop thinking skills is the literature circle. The literature circle provide a basis for student-centered studies, significantly affects the level of participation in classes and brings learning experiences by applying (Clarke, 2006; Cazden, 2001; Nystrand, Gamoran, & Heck, 1993;Rosenblatt, 1978). The literature circle method is a remarkable tool for students to be interested in texts (Deniz & Ersoy, 2016; Stien & Beed, 2004). Literature circles are noteworthy for investigating socio-cultural influences in terms of its providing an opportunity for peer interaction at high level (Lafer, 2014; Clarke, 2006). Literature circles have a great power to support classroom reading because, literary circles effectively incorporate collaborative learning, shared and independent reading, group discussion and effective participation at many levels. Students “can use initiative in learning by doing active reading and writing activities (Bernadowski & Morgano, 2011, p.4).
Show more

9 Read more

What Do Iranian EFL Learners and Teachers Think of Teaching Impoliteness?

What Do Iranian EFL Learners and Teachers Think of Teaching Impoliteness?

any points about the issue if they wished. To check for the construct validity of the questionnaire, factor analysis was run. The problematic items were removed from the questionnaire, so the final version included 31 items. These items were grouped into seven clear-cut categories. The first category, including items 11, 14, 24, and 26, was related to the significance of politeness and impoliteness in everyday use of language. The second category, including items 2, 8, and 19, compared the importance of impoliteness and politeness. The third category was about the basic question of whether there is any need to teach the impolite aspect of language. It involved items 5, 6, 9, 10, 16, 28, and 31. The fourth category, including items 21 and 29, pertained to the way impoliteness should be taught. The fifth category that involved items 1, 3, 4, 7, 12, 15, 18, 25, 27, and 30 was related to the levels at which impoliteness should be taught. The sixth category embracing items 17 and 23 focused on the role of gender. And finally, the seventh category incorporating items 13, 20, and 22 was about the context (i.e., EFL or ESL) in which impoliteness needed to be taught.
Show more

16 Read more

A Phenomenological Study on Turkish Language Teachers’ Views on Characters in Children's Books

A Phenomenological Study on Turkish Language Teachers’ Views on Characters in Children's Books

Based on these references, it can be concluded that concerning the relation between literature, child book, character/protagonist and education, one of the most important properties that child book protagonists should have is “that the protagonist provides opportunity to the child to identify with him” (Sever, 1995). As is widely known, characters in children’s books are always either negative or positive references for children (Mardi, 2006) Taking this fact into consideration, taking after a character in a positive sense will help the child to improve his behavior. In addition, the child will not only ameliorate his behavior but also see the relevant character as a friend and thereby start to understand the society and people thanks to this imaginative hero (Erdem, 2011), and have self-confidence (Zivtçi, 2006). Moreover, the child who makes imaginative friend with the protagonist of the story he reads will have the opportunity to develop his personality by analogy with the features of the protagonist and have an insight into what kind of problems he would encounter and how to behave in the presence of such problems thanks to that protagonist (Kırıtoğlu Özdil, 2011).
Show more

8 Read more

A Comparative Study Of The Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, And Readiness Of American Versus Turkish Language Teachers

A Comparative Study Of The Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, And Readiness Of American Versus Turkish Language Teachers

he objectives of teacher education in the USA are not nation-wide in scale as in other countries like Japan, China, England, France, Germany, and Turkey. Each state sets its objectives to meet its specific needs. All institutions must meet the necessary requirements of National Science Education Standards developed by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards if they wish to offer teaching certificate programs (NRC, 1996: cited in Karamustafaoglu, O. 2009; Karamustafaoglu, Cerrah and Sevim, 2003). In the USA it was enough to be graduated from a two-year undergraduate program to be a teacher as of the early 1980s in the USA. From then on, teacher education began to be implemented at the undergraduate/postgraduate level. In undergraduate programs, student teachers are required to complete the pre-requisite courses of teaching departments in other faculties in 2 years before graduation. Then they can continue 2 years of teaching programs in the undergraduate study by taking into account their academic history and the interviews. In postgraduate programs, graduate students can enter one-year master's program if they have graduated from a program of 5 years at the teaching department or from the faculty of letters by completing a minor program in teaching if they wish to attend the pro-teach program. They complete the teaching process in the program in at least two full days of practice a week (Demirel, 2000; Karamustafaoglu, 2009).
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...