Top PDF The Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

The Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

The Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

Intended use All services where service users able to self-complete a questionnaire All services where service users able to participate in a face to face interview Measuring th[r]

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Validity and test-retest reliability of the self-completion Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT-SCT4) with adults with long-term physical, sensory and mental health conditions in England

Validity and test-retest reliability of the self-completion Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT-SCT4) with adults with long-term physical, sensory and mental health conditions in England

Validity and test-retest reliability of the self-completion Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT-SCT4) with adults with long-term physical, sensory and mental health conditions in [r]

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Cross-cultural adaptation and construct validity of the German version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit for service users (German ASCOT)

Cross-cultural adaptation and construct validity of the German version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit for service users (German ASCOT)

Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments; EXCELC: EXploring Comparative Effectiveness and efficiency in Long-term Care (research project); AUT: Austria; CAPI: Computer-assisted personal interview; CASP-12 control and autonomy subscale: Six-item subscale taken from the Control, Autonomy, Self-realization and Pleasure measure (CASP-12) focusing on the control and autonomy dimensions; EQ-5D: EuroQol five- dimensional questionnaire for assessing HRQoL; EQ-5D-3L: Three-level version of the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire for assessing HRQoL; FSW: Vienna Social Fund; FWF: Austrian Science Fund; HRQoL: Health-related quality of life; ICECAP-O: ICEpop CAPability measure for Older people; (I)ADL: (Instrumental) activities of daily living; INT4: Four response-level inter- view version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit; LTC: Long-term care; LTC-QoL: Long-term care related quality of life; MDS: Minimum Data Set; NORFACE: New Opportunities for Research Funding Agency Cooperation in Europe; QoL: Quality of life; RCT: Randomized controlled trial; SCRQoL: Social care related quality of life; SCT4: Four response-level self-completion tool ver- sion of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit; SU: Service user; WU: Vienna University of Economics and Business
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Adapting the adult social care outcomes toolkit (ASCOT) for use in care home quality monitoring: conceptual development and testing

Adapting the adult social care outcomes toolkit (ASCOT) for use in care home quality monitoring: conceptual development and testing

Feedback from the consultations with stakeholders and preliminary testing in one local authority indicates that there is a use for this measure, especially in local author- ity quality monitoring teams, and that the ASCOT do- mains work at the care home level. However, it also highlighted the skilled nature of collecting data about quality of life through structured observations and interviews and the importance of thorough information gathering to inform ratings. The observational element of the draft toolkit worked well but training would be re- quired to ensure a consistent approach. If used in quality monitoring, the interviews require further work to fit with the time constraints of those collecting the data and en- sure adequate information is collected from a variety of sources. Alternative modes of engagement, including pos- tal questionnaires for family members, should be explored. The potential for this measure to aid user choice arose several times during the consultation phase and reflects a wider political and cultural shift towards encouraging the public to adopt a consumer-approach to long-term care [53, 54]. Certainly previous research and the result of our own consultation indicates that the public would value a quality indicator based on residents’ outcomes [30] but this raises the issue of who would be respon- sible for collecting the data and making it public. Profes- sional stakeholders suggested Healthwatch might be best placed to fulfil this role and this might be something than individual authorities and local Healthwatch teams might explore in the future. However, for such informa- tion to be truly of use to prospective residents and their families, ratings would need to be available on all homes in their area. With around 10, 087 homes for older people in England [55], this is not a small task and would require substantial resources, even with the use of trained volunteers. Furthermore, research evidence sug- gests the information may not be widely used by the pub- lic. The decision to move into a care home is often made at a time of crisis and constrained by the availability of places [56] and greater weight is often given to ‘word of mouth’ or the reviews of people who know the services [15, 57]. The previous regulator, the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI), found that less than 1 % of social care users said they used the previous star ratings when making a decision about which home to move to [15].
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Population-based preference weights for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT) for Service Users for Austria: findings from a best-worst experiment

Population-based preference weights for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT) for Service Users for Austria: findings from a best-worst experiment

The Adult Social Care Outcome Toolkit for Service Users (ASCOT), developed in England, has been translated into several languages (van Leeuwen et al., 2015; Milte et al., 2014; Nakamura-Thomas et al., 2019; Towers et al., 2016) and has recently been translated into German. ASCOT is a LTC-related QoL (LTC-QoL) measure for investigating the impact of LTC services on service users’ QoL across eight domains (Netten et al., 2012). These eight domains cover both basic aspects, such as personal cleanliness, food and drink or personal safety, and higher order aspects, such as social participation, occupation or control (Netten et al., 2012). Within each of the eight domains, LTC service users indicate their QoL-state on a 4-level scale, ranging from ‘ideal state’ to ‘high-level needs’. In addition to providing insight into domain-specific outcomes of LTC service provision, domain scores can be combined to generate an overall ASCOT score for the purpose of evaluation.
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Exploring the views of being a proxy from the perspective of unpaid carers and paid carers: developing a proxy version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

Exploring the views of being a proxy from the perspective of unpaid carers and paid carers: developing a proxy version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

This qualitative study sought to identify and explore key challenges with rating ASCOT social care-related quality of life on behalf of someone else from the perspective of two groups of proxy respondents: paid carers and unpaid carers. We aimed to assess how, given the issues identi- fied, quality-of-life instruments might be adapted for proxy use. We argue that ‘framing questions’ in a proxy instrument may help to reduce bias that can arise from respondents systematically adopting different proxy per- spectives in formulating their response, and improve the acceptability of the instrument to proxy respondents. In particular, we propose that proxy questionnaires should have the following features: (1) providing two sets of re- sponse options for each proxy perspective (one for the proxy’s own view and one from the proxy’s view of what they think the care recipient would answer if they were able to); (2) adding comments boxes to help people ex- plain why they have selected a given response option (especially where these indicate unmet need); (3) clearly identifying the role of the proxy respondent (paid or un- paid carer), including their relationship with the care re- cipient; and (4) providing clear guidance setting out exactly what is expected of the proxy respondent and how they should complete the questionnaire. As to the latter, this might include specific commitments that indi- viduals’ responses would be anonymised and not linked specifically to service eligibility/assessment for individ- uals. We outline how we subsequently embedded these features into a proxy version of the ASCOT measure in a separate paper [51].
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Japanese translation and cross-cultural validation of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT) in Japanese social service users

Japanese translation and cross-cultural validation of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT) in Japanese social service users

seemingly obtaining the enough number for data analysis. The following cases were excluded from the analysis: cases missing answers to all the ASCOT questions and missing care level information. Thirty-nine cases were excluded, which brought the total number of cases for the analysis to 1102. Table 3 shows the demographics of the partici- pants in the examination of the pre-final version. Among the participants, 64% were women. Over 80% of the re- spondents were 75 years of age or older, whereas 16.6% were 65 to 74 years old. There were 189 participants (17.2%) who lived alone. Recipients of Care level 1 consti- tuted 21.9% of the sample, followed by recipients of Care 2 level (20.2%), Support level 2 (18.9%). Over half of the respondents rated their health as good (53.0%); under a third rated their health as fair (29.0%) and 6.2% as poor. Given the distribution of care need levels within the sample, the care need levels of participants in the cognitive debriefing seemed to cover the diversity of survey participants. A notable difference in that the survey data were collected only from people living in a suburban area while the data for the cognitive debriefing were collected from people living in both suburban and city centre areas.
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The EXCELC project in Finland : The main descriptive findings from surveys using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

The EXCELC project in Finland : The main descriptive findings from surveys using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

Secondly, we want to express our warmest thanks to our colleagues from Austria and England. English colleagues, Julien Forder, Juliette Malley, Eirini Saloniki, Laurie Batchelder, Stacey Rand, Kamilla Razik, Peter Burge and Hui Lu, have provided important help and advice in translating ASCOT questionnaires, designing data collection, questionnaires that were used to collect data, the execution of the survey collec- tion via structured interviews, and advise in data cleaning and analysis. Austrian colleagues of ours, Birgit Trukeschitz, Assma Hajji, Judith Kleininger, Judith Litschauer and Adiam Schoch, have provided im- portant peer support to the Finnish research team by sharing their experiences from data collection on the ASCOT quality of life and the effectiveness of long-term care in Austria. Shared data and experiences from the project have already produced a number of joint publications. Our thanks also go to all other people at University of Kent, London School of Economics and Vienna University of Economics and Business who have been involved in the EXCELC project at various stages.
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Validity and test-retest reliability of the self-completion adult social care outcomes toolkit (ASCOT-SCT4) with adults with long-term physical, sensory and mental health conditions in England

Validity and test-retest reliability of the self-completion adult social care outcomes toolkit (ASCOT-SCT4) with adults with long-term physical, sensory and mental health conditions in England

This study also indicates that the ASCOT-SCT4 is a feasible instrument, with low levels of non-response for all items (<1%) except for Dignity (<4%). The higher percentage of missing data for Dignity may be explained by the inapplicability of the revised item for respondents who received services (for example, equipment or house- hold adaptations) that do not involve ongoing, regular interaction with care professionals. Of the cases of miss- ing data (n = 25), twenty cases represent respondents who reported using equipment/adaptations without any other type of ongoing social care support. This should be considered in future use of the questionnaire with a diverse sample, in which respondents may receive inter- ventions that do not involve personal interaction with care workers. Although Dignity was developed in the English context to capture the positive or negative effect on an individual ’ s sense-of-self due to the way in which care and support are delivered [13], a qualitative study of older South Australians found that respondents understood the item to also refer to unpaid care by friends or relatives as well as wider community support [6]. Therefore, although the revised item may focus the respondent on the intended construct, it clearly makes the instrument less suitable for samples where respon- dents are not in receipt of social care delivered through face-to-face contact with paid care staff.
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Carer social care-related quality of life outcomes: estimating English preference weights for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit for Carers (ASCOT-Carer)

Carer social care-related quality of life outcomes: estimating English preference weights for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit for Carers (ASCOT-Carer)

We found the values of the levels within each attribute of the ASCOT-Carer monotonically increased, which was in-line with our expectations given that the levels were placed on an ordinal scale. The largest utility differences were found be- tween the second highest-valued level (level 2) compared to the second lowest-valued level (level 3) for all attributes except the 'safety' attribute. There were fewer differences between the highest and second-highest valued level (levels 1 and 2). The steep drop in perceived utility when moving between level 2 and level 3 may indicate that people tend to place higher value on positively framed outcomes (ie, ideal state or no needs), and major changes to utility are implemented once reaching a certain state (ie, some needs or high needs). Interestingly, for the 'safety' attribute, the decrements between the levels were fairly similar.
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Dutch translation and cross-cultural validation of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

Dutch translation and cross-cultural validation of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT)

In this study, the original English ASCOT was translated into the Dutch language according to the ‘translation and cross-cultural adaptation guidelines for self-report measures’ of Beaton et al. [12], including forward and back-translations. Pilot tests of the prefinal Dutch trans- lation were done in a sample of community-dwelling frail older adults from the ‘frail older Adults: Care in Transition’ (ACT) study. The ACT study is a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial designed to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of a geriatric care model for frail older adults living at home in two regions in the Netherlands and has been described in more detail else- where [13]. The prefinal version of the ASCOT was in- cluded in one of the follow-up measurements in one of the regions (190 respondents). Data were collected at the participant’s own home by means of computer assisted personal interviewing (CAPI). The response distributions obtained in the pilot tests of the Dutch translation of the ASCOT in the ACT study were compared to the response distributions using the original English version in a similar sample in England from the ‘Identifying the Impact of Adult Social Care’ (IIASC) study. The IIASC study is a survey of 990 publicly funded social care service users in England (Forder et al., in preparation). In this study, data collection either took place at the participant’s home by CAPI or was conducted by telephone.
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Factor structure and construct validity of the adult social care outcomes toolkit for carers (ASCOT-carer)

Factor structure and construct validity of the adult social care outcomes toolkit for carers (ASCOT-carer)

individual EQ-5D dimensions. This would be expected since the EQ-5D captures the distinct (but related) con- struct of HRQoL, whereas SCRQoL deliberately omits overtly health-related domains to focus instead on other domains associated with the effect of social care on quality of life [ 21 ]. Moderate associations were observed for overall quality of life and the carer-specific measures of experience and burden. The ASCOT-Carer performs as expected, and the findings indicate that the measure captures a different construct to existing measures of carer strain, caring experience and health-related quality of life. Furthermore, the hypothesised relationships be- tween SCRQoL and related measures or contextual fac- tors reached significance in the univariate analysis in all except for two cases, and half of these relationships were also significant in multivariate analysis that controls for the other factors. In the multivariate analysis, the largest effects were observed for the perceived quality and adequacy of social care support, as well as factors (e.g. loneliness and isolation, impact of caring on health and social or leisure time) that social care services and policy aim to address. This indicates that the ASCOT-Carer measures what it is intended to measure, namely the aspects of quality of life related to concerns of carers that may be supported by social care service or policy inter- ventions [ 26 ].
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Developing a proxy version of the Adult Social Care Outcome Toolkit (ASCOT)

Developing a proxy version of the Adult Social Care Outcome Toolkit (ASCOT)

If individual quality of life is used evaluate the effect- iveness of interventions and policy of social care in this way, a key challenge is how to collect quality of life data from people with cognitive or communication difficul- ties, who are unable to answer on their own behalf even with support, alternative formats or communication aids, so to avoid the issues of sampling bias and system- atic exclusion from ‘having a voice’ [19–21]. In the evaluation of health care interventions using patient- reported outcome or experience measures, a widely-used method is the collection of data from someone who answers on behalf of the individual whose quality of life is to be assessed (by ‘proxy’). Despite its widespread use, it has been argued that data collection by proxy-report should only be used as a last resort when other methods are not possible because it takes away the individual’s opportunity to express their views [22, 23]. While the standard in quality of life measurement is self-report whenever possible, it is recognised that proxy-report is preferable to the systematic exclusion of individuals who are unable to self-report based primarily on the princi- ples of equity and inclusion, as well as the potential methodological issues associated with missing data and bias [19, 20].
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Developing a proxy version of the Adult social care outcome toolkit (ASCOT)

Developing a proxy version of the Adult social care outcome toolkit (ASCOT)

If individual quality of life is used evaluate the effect- iveness of interventions and policy of social care in this way, a key challenge is how to collect quality of life data from people with cognitive or communication difficul- ties, who are unable to answer on their own behalf even with support, alternative formats or communication aids, so to avoid the issues of sampling bias and system- atic exclusion from ‘ having a voice ’ [19 – 21]. In the evaluation of health care interventions using patient- reported outcome or experience measures, a widely-used method is the collection of data from someone who answers on behalf of the individual whose quality of life is to be assessed (by ‘ proxy ’ ). Despite its widespread use, it has been argued that data collection by proxy-report should only be used as a last resort when other methods are not possible because it takes away the individual ’ s opportunity to express their views [22, 23]. While the standard in quality of life measurement is self-report whenever possible, it is recognised that proxy-report is preferable to the systematic exclusion of individuals who are unable to self-report based primarily on the princi- ples of equity and inclusion, as well as the potential methodological issues associated with missing data and bias [19, 20].
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Adult Health and Social Outcomes of Children Who Have Been in Public Care: Population-Based Study

Adult Health and Social Outcomes of Children Who Have Been in Public Care: Population-Based Study

Physical and mental health outcomes of public care are shown in Table 4. In both genders, those with a history of care were more likely to be high scorers on the Malaise Inventory, indicative of cur- rent psychological morbidity. Men but not women were more likely to have seen a mental health spe- cialist for a mental health disorder since age 16. Among both men and women, those with a history of care were more likely to have fair or poor per- ceived general health but were not more likely to have a history of accidents or alcohol problems or to have used illicit drugs. Public care was not associ- ated with higher risk for teenage pregnancy. These findings were not materially changed when analyses were repeated excluding cases that were considered only likely to have been in care at 5 years (data not shown).
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A study of data continuity in adult social care services

A study of data continuity in adult social care services

Good-quality assessments are required to support personalisation for the individual. However, it is possible that accessibility to services for people with significant needs might still be limited; social care professionals are still required to make a judgement about eligibility before co-producing a response in accordance with the client concerns and outcomes they are seeking. Data will also be input in concurrent streams, and therefore the decision-making points could also contribute to rate limiting in the process over time (Cooper et al., 2011). Historically, there has been interest in us- ing case-review systems, monitoring tools that support social work service provision to clients, while promoting the use of new technology for digital- based record keeping (Goldberg and Warburton, 1979). Using data from existing assessment documents provides the basis for identifying require- ments and improving decision making (Foster et al., 2008).
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Practitioner Toolkit: Working With Adult English Language Learners

Practitioner Toolkit: Working With Adult English Language Learners

What strengths do adult English language learners bring to educational programs? Whatever their educational background, all adult learners bring to the classroom a great deal of life experience and background knowledge. They are generally highly motivated to learn, and they usually enroll voluntarily in programs. They often have attended school in their country of origin and have learned to read and write a language before learning English. Many have positive memories of school and are eager to continue their education (Burt, Peyton, & Adams, 2003; Fitzgerald, 1995; Skilton-Sylvester & Carlo, 1998). If they have had formal schooling in their native languages, they may have knowledge in subject matter areas like math, science, and social studies. Many adult learners also have strong and supportive families, who often help with child care. They may also have support networks within their language and culture groups that help them adjust to life in the United States and gain access to services.
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Adult Social Care Self-Service Platform Implementation Support

Adult Social Care Self-Service Platform Implementation Support

 Application of Agilisys’ robust Benefits Management toolkit, which supports the Council to define the benefits they wish to achieve from the introduction of the platform, measure baseline performance prior to the implementation of the self-service platform, and monitor the achievement of those benefits after it has been implemented

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Adult Social Care. Strategic Service Plan 2015/16

Adult Social Care. Strategic Service Plan 2015/16

Adult Social Care is a business unit led by customer need, and as a result we have a number of well established engagement and consultation mechanisms already in place, many of which were enhanced during 2014/15. Some of these arrangements are local; others are based upon national arrangements linked to the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) and the Sector Led Improvement agenda for local authorities. All of our engagement processes are overseen by appropriate research governance arrangements.

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Adult Social Care Peer Review

Adult Social Care Peer Review

4. In addition the peer review team was asked to consider the degree to which the department has an “Outward Focus” in particular around its use of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF), influence of Think Local, Act Personal (TLAP) and the use of the Safeguarding Adults Framework on policy, practice and performance management culture. However as a comprehensive Adult Safeguarding peer review was carried out during May 2012, this peer review team’s consideration of adult safeguarding was not extensive but took into consideration the findings and progress of that review.
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