Top PDF Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

The majority of head teachers used elements of both approaches and balanced the different pressures of wanting the best for every child as well as the need to create positive and calm environments in their schools, when making these tough decisions. There were a number of examples of schools that considered how best to meet children’s needs, but used exclusion where this had failed. Several head teachers relayed how challenging it is to make decisions about fixed period and permanent exclusion, which they “do not use lightly”. While I visited schools that took a range of views on exclusion, most took a balanced and measured approach to seeking alternatives and using exclusion only where these had failed. There was, however, frustration among many staff in schools who took these balanced and proportionate approaches, where they felt a small minority of their peers in other schools did not. This resulted in them admitting children from other schools who they perceived had been excluded when it was not proportionate, or even children who had been off- rolled from other schools. One school leader even admitted off-rolling had happened in his own school. In addition to outlining the approach to behaviour and exclusion, staff within schools also spoke of the range of challenges faced by pupils outside of school. One teacher noted that “the drivers behind the variation in exclusion rates are very similar to the drivers behind other disengaged groups … Poverty and a lack of aspiration are significant”. Other school staff noted home lives, poor parenting and levels of poverty and deprivation contribute to the challenges faced by schools. While many raised this in the context of articulating the additional support in place to help children overcome such challenges, it remains the case that children who are eligible for FSM are around four times more likely to be excluded permanently than children who are not eligible for FSM. 40
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Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

If pupils have BESD or SEMH category SEN and are in the Spring term of Year 9 or older, we use their SEN status in the Autumn term of Year 9. For other pupils we use their SEN status observed in the term prior to exclusion. Disruptive behaviour may in some cases prompt an assessment of underlying conditions, such as BESD or SEMH needs, which may manifest in this way hence higher exclusion rates may at least partly reflect identification of their needs. This reduces (although does not eliminate) the extent to which any identified differences in exclusions for these pupils will be purely reflective of differences in behaviour. At the same time, identifying SEN in Year 9 rather than earlier allows us to observe some pupils with SEMH, which is first observed in 2015 and not a SEN status for any pupils in our dataset at ages younger than Year 9.
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Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Biggart et al. (2013), examining the situations of GRT children, presents ‘belonging’ as the polar opposite of feeling ‘excluded’. A reduced sense of belonging led to pupils feeling disconnected from school and engaging and investing less in it. Sometimes the pull of other relationships, such as with peers outside of school, could then dominate. This issue overlaps with wellbeing, additional needs and SEMH issues, which are examined more closely in the next section. Obsuth et al. (2017b) conducted a randomised control trial (RCT) with 644 pupils aged 12 to 15 in London who were at risk of exclusion. Analysis was based on self-reports from the 644 pupils and 685 teacher reports for pupils who were nominated for the study. They found that a pupil’s relationship with a teacher or other adults in the school was the strongest predictor of emotional wellbeing. The RCT was evaluating one type of intervention which saw external providers deliver communication and social skills training in both group and one-to-one sessions. The study found primarily null effect with one negative finding, suggesting that short term interventions, like the one evaluated, delivered in school by external providers may not be effective in reducing school exclusions and related behavioural problems.
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Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

DfE should update statutory guidance on exclusions to provide more clarity on the use of exclusion. DfE should also ensure all relevant, overlapping guidance (including behaviour management, exclusions, mental health and behaviour, guidance on the role of the designated teacher for looked after and previously looked after children and the SEND Code of Practice) is clear, accessible and consistent in its messages to help schools manage additional needs, create positive behaviour cultures, make reasonable adjustments under the Equality Act 2010 and use exclusion only as last resort, when nothing else will do. Guidance should also include information on robust and well-evidenced strategies that will support schools embedding this in practice.
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Towards a review of the Steiner Waldorf Curriculum : report of the Rapid Appraisal (RA) Consultation Exercise undertaken in March 2019

Towards a review of the Steiner Waldorf Curriculum : report of the Rapid Appraisal (RA) Consultation Exercise undertaken in March 2019

The question becomes, is Steiner philosophy a guiding or shaping principle or does it directly influence and impact on the formation and delivery of the curriculum? And how does attention to teacher education enable this? Approaches to using some of Steiner’s ideas include interpreting them in a systematic, rather than a literal way, in order to iteratively relate the whole to the parts. Here, Steiner’s ideas can be used as heuristic concepts or suggestions for experimental attitudes to knowledge. For example, the ‘rhythm in learning’ recognised in Steiner’s pedagogy is translated into how the school day is ‘structured in an organic way’ which ensures a healthy mix of activities that are balanced, for example, moving and then resting. (Avison and Rawson 2016, 31). This example is easily accommodated and articulated within the logic and structure of a Steiner curriculum. There are others, such as the mapping of the curriculum to the three cycles of development that appear more opaque in their justification. Given that a potential outcome is to create a ‘misstep’, or disjunction perhaps, between the Steiner curriculum and the English National Curriculum, this becomes significant in terms of curriculum transitions.
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Consultation Process for the. National School Chaplaincy Program

Consultation Process for the. National School Chaplaincy Program

Although the DEEEWR NSCP guidelines state that “school chaplains cannot provide services for which they are not qualified, for example, counselling services or psychological assessment, or medical assessment” (NSCP FAQ, 2010), it also states that school chaplains are employed to „support‟ students for issues such as “grief, family breakdown and other crisis situations” (2010, p.2). From a psychological perspective, „grief, family breakdown and other crisis situations‟ can be highly complex situations requiring a sensitively handled psychological intervention. How an individual deals with these is determined by their personality, background, relationships, supports, mental health condition, ability to cope, cognitions etc.
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Perspectives on consultation with parents in the development of the school plan

Perspectives on consultation with parents in the development of the school plan

As defined in Section 1.8, Chapter One, the researcher is a primary district inspector, with the Department of Education and Science. During the academic year 2002-2003, the district consisted of forty-five schools and four hundred and eighty-four teachers. Two of the schools were Gaelscoileanna and for the reasons outlined previously in Section 1.9, Delimitations of Scope and Key Assumptions, were not included in the current research. The schools included in the research, and the principals included in the quantitative phase of this research are the forty-three principals of the remaining schools in the district of the researcher. In selecting as the sample the district of a primary district inspector, the researcher opted to focus on a naturally occurring cluster of a particular cross-section of primary school sites; the underlying aim being to investigate consultation with parents in the development of the school plan in a broadly representative cluster of national schools, of various types, both suburban and rural and including a number of schools serving designated areas of disadvantage. The school sites therefore, include a range of school types, single sex boys and girls, mixed schools, junior and senior schools, in a variety of settings – suburban, town and rural schools. Communication patterns, however, may vary in schools of different size INTO (1993, p.19) and so, it was deemed necessary to include in the sample a
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Psychiatric Consultation in a Secondary School in Kuala Lumpur

Psychiatric Consultation in a Secondary School in Kuala Lumpur

Psychiatric Consultation in a Secondary School in Kuala Lumpur Med J Malaysia Vol 38 No I March 1983 PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION IN A SECONDARY SCHOOL IN KUALA LUMPUR LOKE KWOK HIEN WOON TAl HWANG SUMMAR[.]

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Public consultation on school handbooks and better information for parents results from the online consultation

Public consultation on school handbooks and better information for parents results from the online consultation

"Specifically, X would encourage all schools in Scotland to reference their anti-bullying policy within handbooks, set in the context of both the 'National Approach to Anti-Bullying for Scotland's Children and Young People' and guidance provided by their local authority. Parents should have information on how to access policies, what their role in implementation is, and how bullying behaviour will be responded to within the school community. Information on the wealth of resources and training provided by respectme for parents, teachers or any adult with a role to play in the lives of children and young people should be promoted in the handbook to aid consistency and understanding. This approach would help maximise the impact of the Government's
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Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

This information may come from the social networks that managers have built along their academic and professional careers. Gelatkanycz and Hambrick [39] stated that the social networks of a manager can contribute to better performance in two ways: first, by improving access to external resources (funding), and second by acquiring information about the management methods used in other companies. From the above discussion, it may be concluded that there are common factors that can explain a positive covariation between the higher performance of entrepreneurs in their real businesses and a better outcome of their financial investments.
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CONSULTATION PAPER ON REVIEW OF REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR 28 MAY 2012 UNLISTED MARGINED DERIVATIVES OFFERED TO RETAIL INVESTORS

CONSULTATION PAPER ON REVIEW OF REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR 28 MAY 2012 UNLISTED MARGINED DERIVATIVES OFFERED TO RETAIL INVESTORS

4.7 Increasingly, MAS has seen white-label partnerships and arrangements adopted by FIs looking to enter or expand their retail online-trading business. White labelling refers to the practice of leasing the right to place the FI's (the lessee) name on another firm's (the lessor) trading platform and market it as its own, and then passing the trades through to the lessor (typically another licensed FI). In the typical while label arrangement, the lessee's customers do not have a contractual relationship with, and in fact may be unaware of, the lessor that owns and operates the platform. The lessee is the issuing counterparty of the unlisted derivative contract to the customer. In other models, the lessee may trade as an agent on behalf of the customers and places the customers’ margins with the lessor that is the eventual counterparty/issuer of the derivative contract.
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Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that impact students’ attitude and motivation towards learning. The current study was conducted to improve the understanding of the factors that contribute towards academic progress of a student. The problem is that there is a knowledge gap due to limited studies related to students at risk. Previous research has focused on attitude and motivation in different contextual settings, but none of them really focused on the attitude and motivation of students that are identified at risk. Additionally, this research will fill the knowledge gap by studying how attitude and motivation can minimize the number of students at risk. Hence, the research question is what are the challenges faced by students at risk in learning? What factors contribute and lead the students to be identified at risk? This topic has been selected because it contributes towards the development of the learners, it will enhance the understanding of the academics on what attributes and factors will impact the students that are at risk of failure or withdraw, as it is a phenomenal that all the academic institutions are facing. Yet, there is a knowledge gap in research about the topic, furthermore this paper suggests a method composed of surveys and a comprehensive review of existing literature to fill the gap. Studies reveal that attitude is one of the central elements along with motivation in determining success in learning. To guide this study, attention will be directed toward the factors and attributes responsible for attitude and motivation.
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Certificate III in Ageing Support Consultation Guide March 2019

Certificate III in Ageing Support Consultation Guide March 2019

It is noted that all of the above points will be consulted on once more in Phase Two, when the wider review of Units of Competency is conducted. This will provide an opportunity to examine the content of the existing Units and determine any required changes, as well as again considering whether they are to be included in the core or the electives.

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Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

Volume 08 Issue 03 (2019) May-June 2019

From this figure it appears that intellectual capital is the difference between market value and financial capital so it is the source of the difference between market and book value for many corporations over the world like Microsoft. Waterhouse (1999) argues that intellectual capital assets are strategically now more important to wealth creation than they ever were in the past. From literature review, we can said that intellectual capital is the resource of sustained competitive advantage in knowledge age because is a factor of survive and gaining benefits and creating value. Conclusion
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The physician's self-evaluation of the consultation and patient outcome: a longitudinal study

The physician's self-evaluation of the consultation and patient outcome: a longitudinal study

Agreement on the reason for the complaint, concise information about treatment, expectations fulfi lled, and the overall feeling of the patient being taken seriously, items 6 – 10 as perceived by the GP, were signifi cantly correlated with improved health one month later as judged by the patient (see Table I). Items 1 – 5 focus on the patients ’ needs while items 6 – 10 focus on interaction, mutual understanding, and cooperation in the consultation.

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Autistic girls and school exclusion: perspectives of students and their parents

Autistic girls and school exclusion: perspectives of students and their parents

Notably, parent battles were prominent in trying to secure appropriate school for their children with one parent stating: ‘We didn’t get any support and anything that was initiated was initiated by myself’. Parents had to contact agencies themselves due to limited school support: ‘I spoke to [the] education inclusion [service] myself on several occasions to try and find a best way forward for her’. However, in some cases, parents were unsure of the effectiveness of the support: ‘if I couldn’t understand what was going on what hope did they have really?’ Some parents also felt that barriers were placed in the way of achieving success for their child, without considering their needs: ‘[the school] set the bar in the same place for a child with no difficulties. . .it was just setting her up to fail’. Parents of autistic girls frequently face challenges in securing an accurate diagnosis, and understanding what this means for their child, and may result in parents feeling isolated: ‘never been any sup- port for us as parents’; ‘because I didn’t have that support I did feel failed. We were just left on our own to deal with it basically’. A strong desire for support, to have someone to talk to ‘just even a shoulder to cry on’ was indicative across all parent interviews. Additionally, one parent identified that it is also important for parents ‘to understand teachers a bit better, because I think parents don’t understand how much pressure teachers are under’. It was thought that this could improve working relationships and poten- tially avoid an oppositional stance when communica- tion breaks down.
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young people on race, school exclusion and leaving care

young people on race, school exclusion and leaving care

Young people from minority ethnic backgrounds are consistently over-represented in indices of disadvantage. They are more likely to face barriers at school and in the workplace, even though they stay on in education longer. But despite the prejudice they face, young people from minority ethnic communities are up-beat about their lives.

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Independent Review of Retirement Income: Consultation

Independent Review of Retirement Income: Consultation

I have tried to provide nothing but a summary and to avoid putting my own interpretation on the responses: obviously in summarising verbal questions, it is impossible to avoid some degree of interpretation. 2 Before being asked to take on this task I had submitted a response of my own (I was the only UK academic to do so): since then, I decided that in the interests of impartiality it would be better to withdraw that response. One of the responses explicitly questioned whether the Review was genuinely independent. I have written this summary without any input from David Blake and Debbie Harrison other than an initial discussion about presentation. My own preference for government policy to contain an element of compulsion is not relevant here as I take the new pension freedoms as given. 3 A total of 30 responses were received from a variety of individuals and organisations, the largest single group consisting of ten insurance companies or pension providers, eleven consultants of various types and one lawyer. The following eight organisations also provided submissions: the 100 Group of Finance Directors (100 Group); AGE UK; the Association of Consulting Actuaries (ACA); the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (IFoA); the National Association of Pension Funds (NAPF); the Society of Pension Professionals (SPP); and the Trades Union Congress (TUC). Six of the respondents asked that their submissions be confidential (and some of the other respondents were ambiguous on this point) and for this reason I have not provided a breakdown of the other respondents in order to preserve anonymity. They are, however, gratefully acknowledged in the main report.
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BBC Charter Review Public consultation

BBC Charter Review Public consultation

distinctiveness. Charter Review is also an opportunity to look at the content the BBC is providing. The BBC has made changes to its genre mix in recent years, and consideration needs to be given to whether it is striking the right balance in terms of its offer. In terms of quality and distinctiveness, the BBC’s own data suggests that perceptions have remained broadly consistent in recent years. But in this review we will ask questions about the quality and distinctiveness of BBC content and how success for the BBC is best measured. The way that the BBC determines how it spends £2.4 billion on content is another important element of the scale and scope of its operations for Charter Review to consider. The way content is produced is shaped by two main elements: the broader regulatory framework including the Terms of Trade, which set out how the BBC and other broadcasters work with independent producers, and the BBC’s quota systems. The quotas set minimum amounts of content that must − Audiences. The BBC remains highly
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Speech: Damian Hinds: 2019 NAHT conference: 3 May 2019

Speech: Damian Hinds: 2019 NAHT conference: 3 May 2019

I know that today the fear of the consequences of a single set of bad results can manifest itself in unintended consequences, excessive pressures on headteachers and leaders. Last year I promised we would consult with you on this and how we could make the system better. And today I am confirming that – after a very strong response to our recent consultation on identifying schools for support – that the ‘floor’ and ‘coasting’ standards will be dropped.

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