Top PDF Who wants to be a surgeon? A study of 300 first year medical students

Who wants to be a surgeon? A study of 300 first year medical students

Who wants to be a surgeon? A study of 300 first year medical students

(especially when directly questioned) [3,9,10] with some concluding that discrimination and male bias is still rife [3,11]. Others, however, conclude that while these factors are more important to women than to men, women still rate interest and job satisfaction significantly higher than any other motivation [12-17]. A 1996 study of Canadian female surgeons sums up the situation quite well when it suggests that although most female surgeons did not feel actively discriminated against, the perception of discrimi- nation during surgical training was present [11]. Whatever the findings, it is widely accepted that female role models are rare in surgery and that this should be addressed [8,18].
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Assessment of empathy among first-year medical students: A knowledge, attitude and practice study

Assessment of empathy among first-year medical students: A knowledge, attitude and practice study

ing forward to financial gains as a physician which is evident from the fact that 50 (51%) students have opted to become self practicing physicians and 17 (17.4%) wants to join the currency spinning corporate sector (Table 2). Both options are economical- ly lucrative and would enrich the financial health of the individual. Ironically only 23 (23.5%) wants to join the service oriented rural medical program, although 34 (34.7%) respondents were actually from rural areas. Only 8 (8.2%) students were interested in becoming a medical teacher which is not so much attractive in terms of remuneration (Table 2). We observed a positive trend among the students regarding their percep- tion of medical practice in general as 47 (48%) and 28 (28.6%) respondents identified opportunity to serve the society and respect, respectively, as the factors which sym- bolized medical profession. However the remaining students, who constitute a sub- stantial proportion, gave a reflection of their career oriented outlook as they identified good earning (8/8.2%), going abroad (7/7.1%), scope for higher studies (4/4.1%) and independent practice (4/4.1%) as factors which make medical practice attractive (Table 2). If the above observations are correlated with the primary outcome of our study then it implies that orientation of medical students towards the financial aspects of the profession possibly leads to an erosion of empathy (Figure 2). Similar observations have been documented by Chen et al. (2007) and Nunes et al. (2011) in their research reports, whereby they have found a significant negative association between financial interests associated with medical practice and feeling of empathy among students. In other words both those research groups have concluded that financial orientation is cause for decline in empathetic attitude among medical students.
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Examining the time course of memory retention for medical gross anatomy in first year medical students

Examining the time course of memory retention for medical gross anatomy in first year medical students

models of episodic memory (e.g. Yonelinas, 2002). Dual process models suggest that two distinct processes, recollection and familiarity, underpin episodic memory (Rugg & Curran, 2007). Recollection is defined as a slow effortful process to consciously recall the learning episode and its associated contextual details (Rugg & Curran, 2007). Familiarity, on the other hand, is a fast, automatic process, when a feeling of having experienced the event before is accompanied by an inability to recall contextual details (Rugg & Curran, 2007). Recollection and familiarity processes are dissociated on a neural level. Studies of event related potentials (ERPs) related to these processes have found that distinct neural processes underpin recollection and familiarity. The early component at 300-500ms, the FN400, is thought to correlate with familiarity and the Late Positive Complex (LPC) at 500-800ms with recollective processes (Curran, 2000). In the context of the current study, these results shed light on the different processes that
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Perceptions of first and third year medical students on self-study and reporting processes of problem-based learning

Perceptions of first and third year medical students on self-study and reporting processes of problem-based learning

The scores of the entire study group attributed to breadth and depth of discussion during the reporting phase varied between 3.2 ± 0.9 and 3.7 ± 0.7. Although third-year stu- dents were expected to become more competent in PBL discussions, third-year students' scores, especially the ones attributed to the depth of discussion, were lower than those of first-year students' (Table 2). This finding is consistent with Cohen's view that the students who gain experience in cooperative study are inclined to limit their efforts to share and explain the information they gather [9]. Higher scores of first-year students on the depth of discussion may also be interpreted as a reflection of their adaptation to the PBL system. In the Maastricht study, average scores attributed by first-year students to the breadth and depth of discussion were 3.0 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.5 respectively [6]
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Assessment of learning environment among the first year Malaysian medical students

Assessment of learning environment among the first year Malaysian medical students

Limitations and recommendations The results of the present study could not be generalised for the whole UKM medical faculty because, in this study, the DREEM questionnaires were distributed to first-year medical students only without the involvement of medical students from other academic years. Further studies to assess the perceptions of medical students in other academic years (year two, three, four and five altogether) in UKM using DREEM inventory should be performed in the future for comparisons. An additional comment should be made regarding the level of generality of the present study. In the present study, students were asked to reflect on their learning experience at UKM to date in their current programme of study. Thus, students were reporting perceptions of learning environments that were a summative aggregate of a range of specific learning experiences (i.e., different subjects) in their programme. Such an inclusive frame of reflection across a number of potentially diverse learning contexts may be
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The intuitive use of laryngeal airway tools by first year medical students

The intuitive use of laryngeal airway tools by first year medical students

First, the students did not inflate cuffs by themselves. Hence, the students' performance may not clearly demon- strate lay users' ability to handle unknown airway devices and thus adequate ventilation correctly. Inflating the cuff of the device and connecting the bag-valve to the airway tool was done by an Instructor as well as the first ambu- bag™ compression resulting in a more comparable first ventilation. Reflecting real conditions, it might have been more precise to let the students themselves inflate the cuff. Our specific interest, however, was laid on the time frame between getting involved into the scenario and manually handling an unknown device. Thus, this procedure pre- vented faults or inappropriate handling with the connec- tion between the valve-bag connector and the tube-side connector.
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READ THIS FIRST. Texas Supplement to. Help for the Teenager Who Wants to Drive Online Program

READ THIS FIRST. Texas Supplement to. Help for the Teenager Who Wants to Drive Online Program

presence of the person certifying attendance. The signature of the student can be placed on the form before or as it is presented to DPS. NOTE: Texas Education Code 25.092 (excerpted), Minimum Attendance for Class Credit, states that a student may not be given credit for a class unless the student is in attendance for at least 90 percent of the days the class is offered. The 90 percent attendance rule applies when determining VOE eligibility. Schools can accept decisions of attendance committees when considering VOE eligibility. Summer school does not count as make-up time for attendance purposes unless the attendance committee makes summer school attendance a part of a student’s plan to make up days missed. For students in grades eight and below, absences may be aggregated on the basis of a scholastic year. For students in grades 9-12, absences may be aggregated on the basis of a scholastic semester (traditional, condensed, accelerated, block, etc.). THE STUDENT SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ELIGIBLE FOR THE VOE FORM WHEN 1) the school considers the student
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Menstrual problems in first, second and third year medical students  a concern!

Menstrual problems in first, second and third year medical students a concern!

from friends, academics, gatherings, sports. The college, class absenteeism was up to 16 % (Anandha Lakshmi et al., 2011) in a study of young women by Anandha Lakshmi, rates of absenteeism ranged from 34% to 50% in several studies (Banikarim et al., 2000; Andersch and Milsom, 1982; Sundell et al., 1996). Similar studies among female high school adolescents showed that the majority of female adolescents identified dysmenorrhoea and PMS as problems that significantly affected their academic performance (Banikarim et al., 2000; Wilson and Keye, 1989). Social withdrawal as seen in study by Singh et al was 67.08% (Amitasingh et al., 2008). The biological variable, BMI statistically did not have significant correlation with dysmenorrhea (Pvalue = 0.115) similarly in various other studies correlation BMI and dysmenorrhea was absent (Amitasingh et al., 2008; Gast et al., 2010). Women are particularly susceptible to stress caused by hormonal changes. During puberty, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause, the hormone levels fluctuate and cause stress. Stress also alters menstrual phase length (Mini Sood et al., 2012).
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Emotional intelligence and academic performance in first and final year medical students: a cross-sectional study

Emotional intelligence and academic performance in first and final year medical students: a cross-sectional study

There is an urgent need today to inculcate the virtues of patient-care and self-care in healthcare professionals [12-14]. Patients need more than what a purely analyt- ical doctor can offer. Recovery and therapeutic processes for patients could be more effective with a doctor who was communicating empathetically, ethically and com- petently [14,15]. These professional attributes are well enshrined in the Fundamentals of Professionalism- the physician charter by the ABIM Foundation, Foundation of Medical Ethics and Principles of Biomedical Ethics [16,17]. Demand for a physician who is genuinely inter- ested in the health of patients, incorporating a patient’s personal values and engaging with them in health deci- sions is only increasing in an ageing society, and one with more educated patients and higher standards of healthcare [18]. With these changing external demands and internal quality requirements, it is not hard to com- prehend that today’s physician has to be both smart and “good” [19]. The former generally refers to cognitive knowledge and technical skills, while the latter infers be- ing virtuous and resilient, both mentally and emotion- ally. The latter quality has increasingly been recognized as equally, if not more important, and could well contribute to the former [20-22]. Thus, many medical school programs for prospective students often look into these personal qualities as part of their admissions process [23-25]. Henceforth, the medical education continuum from the medical schools to continuing pro- fessional/medical education is working hard to see that these other traits and skills are being assessed, maintained and developed [26-29].
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Big Fish in a Big Pond: a study of academic self concept in first year medical students

Big Fish in a Big Pond: a study of academic self concept in first year medical students

Although medical students are in a highly selective environment, the effects of being within that setting and a part of that course had no effect on academic self-con- cept or on their self-evaluation. There may be several reasons for this. Firstly, only 20 of a total of 133 stu- dents participated. These students may not be represen- tative of the total sample. They may be students who did well in the first semester and so their academic self- concepts and self-evaluations were not affected by grades. Apart from obtaining a more representative sam- ple, future research should also take grades into account and use structural equation modelling to assess the cau- sal relations between measures of achievement, aca- demic self-concept, and self-evaluation. Secondly, the measures were taken at the beginning of both semesters and overall quite early within the course, so there could be a reflected glory or assimilation effect occurring. Marsh, Kong, and Hau [23] found that “ higher school- average achievements led to lower academic self-con- cepts (contrast effect), whereas higher perceived school status has a counterbalancing positive effect on self-con- cept (reflected-glory, assimilation effect) ” [p. 337]. It may be these first-year medical students are still feeling the glory of being selected into medical school.
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First-year Medical Students Can Demonstrate EHRspecific Communication Skills: A Control-group Study

First-year Medical Students Can Demonstrate EHRspecific Communication Skills: A Control-group Study

Background and Objectives: Graduating medical students will universally use electronic health records (EHRs), yet a June 2007 literature search revealed no descriptions of EHR-specific communication skills curricula in US medical schools. We designed and tested methods to teach first-year medical students to optimally integrate EHRs into physician-patient communication in ambulatory encounters. Methods: We randomly assigned 17 volunteer students to control (n=8) and intervention (n=9) groups. Both groups learned the mechanics of documenting patient histories using the EHR. Additionally, we taught the intervention group EHR-specific communications skills using guided discovery, brief didactics, and practice role plays. We compared both groups’ general and EHR-specific communica- tions skills using a standardized patient (SP) case. Results: Students receiving EHR communication skills training performed significantly better than controls in six of 10 EHR communication skills. In 10 of 11 general communication skills, there were no significant differences between groups. Conclusions: First-year medical students can demonstrate EHR communication skills early in their medical training. However, in our setting, students did not spontaneously demonstrate EHR skills without instruction, and such skills did not correlate with general communication skills.
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A Study of Learning Style Preferences among First Year Undergraduate Medical Students Using VARK Model

A Study of Learning Style Preferences among First Year Undergraduate Medical Students Using VARK Model

Introduction: Medical students have a wide range of diversity in their learning preferences. This has been always a challenge for the teachers to meet the demands of all the medical students. VARK (Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinaesthetic way of learning styles) is a learning inventory grouped under “instructional preference” model. Methods: This study analysed the learning style and approaches to learning among the first year undergraduate students in a tertiary care teaching hospital using VARK questionnaire version. Results: Our study revealed that, unimodal learning preference was among 48% of the students and multimodal learning styles being with 52% of students. Among the unimodal learning preferences, kinaesthetic and auditory learning styles were predominant (35% and 34% respectively). Among multimodal learning style preferences Kinaesthetic, Aural (KA) and Visual, Aural, Kinaesthetic (VAK) styles were predominant. There was no difference in the learning preferences among the sexes (p = 0.208). Conclusion: Since the most preferred learning styles were kinaesthetic and auditory, the strategies employed by students could be recordings of lectures, audio recordings of power point presentations, increased frequency of early clinical exposure to patients in wards and use of models and problem solving questionnaires. This will also help the teachers to act in accordance with students need and guide them in achieving their academic goals.
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Self-care in Medical Education: Effectiveness of Health-habits Interventions for First-year Medical Students

Self-care in Medical Education: Effectiveness of Health-habits Interventions for First-year Medical Students

at least mildly helpful. Despite its brev- ity, some who received the education shifted their behaviors, particularly by maintaining consistent sleep schedules and increasing exercise. This effective- ness suggests the program should be in- corporated as part of the regular curric- ulum, but additional material also needs to be included, especially with regard to alcohol use. Further curriculum devel- opment will need to focus more directly on individual alcohol-use patterns, rec- ognizing normative versus hazardous patterns, and the functional effects of the alcohol consumption (e.g., whether students are using it primarily as a psy- chological coping mechanism).
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Changes in Empathy among First Year Medical Students before and after a Medical Humanities Module

Changes in Empathy among First Year Medical Students before and after a Medical Humanities Module

Introduction: A medical humanities (MH) module is conducted for all first year students at at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal. Objective: The present study was conducted to measure empathy among students before and after a Medical Humanities (MH) module using Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) a validated measure of empathy at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal from February to May 2009. Method: IRI was administered to students before and on conclusion of the module. IRI measures four aspects of empathy: Perspective-taking (PT), Fantasy (FS), Empathic concern (EC) and Personal distress (PD). Students were invited to participate in the study. Demographic information (gender, method of financing of medical education, area of residence and occupations of parents) was collected. The pre-module and post-module scores were compared among different subgroups of respondents using appropriate non- parametric tests (p<0.05). Result: Sixty-four of the 75 students (85.3%) participated in the survey pre-module and 57 students (76%) post-module. Most were self-financing and from urban areas. Before the module the median (interquartile range) FS, PT, EC and PD scores were 20, 18 (15-20), 21 (18.25-24) and 15 (10-18) respectively (maximum score 28 for each subscale). The PD score was significantly higher among females (p<0.001) and students whose father was not a doctor (p=0.049). After the module the median (interquartile range) FS, PT, EC and PD scores were 20 (15-24), 20 (17.5-22), 21 (17.5-23) and 16 (13-19) respectively. The PT score was significantly higher after the module (p=0.023). Conclusion: The module increased PT scores (cognitive empathy) in first year students. Follow up studies and studies in larger populations are required.
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Who Wants to Pass the PMP Exam?

Who Wants to Pass the PMP Exam?

confirming your eligibility to take the exam and providing instructions for scheduling with Sylvan.. • You have three months from date of approval to.[r]

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Welcome to Who Wants to be an APNA Millionaire!

Welcome to Who Wants to be an APNA Millionaire!

22% psychiatric inpatients vs. 9% of the general population consume > 750 mg caffeine a day. A 19-year-old woman on long-term clozapine therapy developed unexpected clozapine toxicosis. She had been drinking 6 caffeinated cola drinks per day. Stopping the cola intake was followed by a substantial reduction in clozapine concentrations.

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PATHOLOGY Chapter: CELL INJURY (for first year medical students in 3 lectures)

PATHOLOGY Chapter: CELL INJURY (for first year medical students in 3 lectures)

Objectives for Cell Injury Chapter (in 3 lectures).. Types of necrosis : Coagulative, Liquefactive, Caseous, gangrenous, fibrinoid and fat necrosis.G. B. Comparison between necrosis and[r]

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Evaluation of a communication skills program for first-year medical students at the University of Toronto

Evaluation of a communication skills program for first-year medical students at the University of Toronto

The program seeks patients who are relatively healthy psy- chologically, have one or two psychosocial issues they would like to address, have a good network of support, and are sufficiently motivated and committed to attend three months of weekly sessions. Common presenting problems are losses (e.g., deaths, loss of health, loss of jobs), relationship difficulties, problems at work and impending life decisions. The screening process has three levels: First, an attempt at self-selection is made by under- scoring the importance of focusing on a key issue and will- ingness to commit to regular attendance in promotional materials. Second, the program's intake coordinator con- ducts a telephone interview involving key questions designed to assess the nature and scope of the patient's issue as well as his or her motivation, support structure and risk of self-harm. Callers for which TCom is deemed unsuitable are encouraged to seek help elsewhere and are provided with alternate resources when appropriate. Third, the supervising psychiatrist and the other 3–4 stu- dents in his or her TCom group observe and evaluate the student's intake assessment with the patient, allowing dif- ficulties to be identified and addressed if they arise. While it sometimes emerges over the course of the sessions that a patient has problems and interpersonal patterns that were not evident during the phone interview or intake assessment, to date there have not been difficulties or cri- ses that could not be handled by the student.
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Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

At present although computer knowledge and compe- tence are not essential requirement for medical under- graduates in Sri Lanka, they are becoming increasingly important due to the reasons such as; Limitation of ac- cess to current books and journals and difficulty in obtaining up to date information, which may affect per- formance at examinations and practice after graduation. Poor computer knowledge can adversely affect the col- lation and analysis of data as well as the final quality of the research work and after graduation it may have an adverse impact on postgraduate training. The present study contributes to the existing scarce knowledge on computer literacy among medical undergraduates in the South Asian region. This together with other similar re- gional studies will provide guidance for regional re- search on interventional training programmes aimed at improving knowledge, based on the identified success predictors.
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A Case Study Exploring the Role of Faculty in Providing Academic Support to First- and Second-Year Medical Students

A Case Study Exploring the Role of Faculty in Providing Academic Support to First- and Second-Year Medical Students

each lecture. He also spoke of linking each PowerPoint slide to the learning outcomes and study guide questions so that when students are studying outside of class it “should give them a good idea of what they should know, what I feel that they should know.” Randy’s description of the academic supports he provided focused primarily on his preparation of lecture materials, with a specific focus on the use of instructional technology. He spoke in detail of the new features of PowerPoint that allow the presenter to annotate slides with voice and ink that students can use outside of the classroom, describing it as a “real focused way for [the students] to go really rapidly to a specific slide in the lecture that they would like another iteration of or that I need to go over in a little bit more detail.” He also spoke of adding multiple-choice questions to lecture slides that allow the student to select an answer that they can use outside of class to “check whether or not they were actually comprehending the material” and pasting sections of related reading resources into the slides. Randy also showed an electronic wireless presenter tool that allows him to point to and zoom in and out of specific sections of a PowerPoint presentation during lecture, but that also shows up on Lecture Capture, unlike a laser pointer. In addition, Randy frequently adds summary slides at the end of the lecture slides “because sometimes there are bigger diagrams that you can’t really just go over in class because it’s too small and it’s just too much information on one slide or you will find these things that summarize the whole thing in one image that will help them pull it all together.” Chinara included presenting the material in class as an academic support, as well as providing free class reading materials right for the students’ level of learning and reference materials with the topic taught.
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