Top PDF Ways of Creating Prefixes and Suffixes and Foreign Language Teaching

Ways of Creating Prefixes and Suffixes and Foreign Language Teaching

Ways of Creating Prefixes and Suffixes and Foreign Language Teaching

Needless to say, morphological level of a language constitutes a significant part in the structure of a language. Prefixes and suffixes should be taken in the same respect as well. The reason is that they have a very big area of usage in English Language. Learners use them widely, and sometimes they may be misused. The aim of this study at first is to clarify the topic of prefixes and suffixes. Later prefixes and suffixes will be handled separately. In the second part of this study, ways of presenting prefixes and suffixes to learners will be dwelt on. In this part some coursebook analysis will be made. This will help the readers to understand the topic better through examples and actual uses. The third part of this study aims to illuminate the readers about the problems faced by learners in learning prefixes and suffixes. The reasons of these problems and ways of eliminating them will also be stated. This part can be very useful for English Language teachers whose learners need some treatment about wrong uses of prefixes and suffixes. At the end will come the last part which will be the conclusion of the study.
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Teaching case suffixes with the aid of the usage of Turkish folk literature in teaching Turkish to the foreign students

Teaching case suffixes with the aid of the usage of Turkish folk literature in teaching Turkish to the foreign students

This study includes only folkloric examples regarding case suffixes of Turkish Language. Also, ways of using tongue twisters, riddles, singing ditty, proverbs and idioms in the lesson have been discussed. Some of the properties that make folkloric works suitable for teaching Turkish are: ability to be sung in a tune (melody), laconism (having short sentences) and applicability in the classroom as well.

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Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Increasingly, language educators contend that foreign language learning should increase students’ intercultural competence (IC) which would allow them to see relationships between different cultures, mediate across these cultures, and critically analyze cultures including their own (Chapelle, 2010). Language teach- ers have now recognized their role in eliciting culture learning in their classrooms and ways to access that learning (Moloney and Harbon, 2010). One such way proposed by Schulz (2007) is through utilization of culturelearning portfolios. According to Schulz, the teaching of intercultural competence should in- clude developing awareness of variables that affect communica- tive interactions, recognizing stereotypes and evaluating them, and developing awareness of types of causes for cultural misun- derstandings between members of different cultures. The use of a culture-learning portfolio allows teachers to assess students’ progress over time based on specific objectives that can be re- lated to individual student interest. These portfolios encourage critical reflection and self-evaluation and, especially important in the area of cultural learning, the use of multiple sources of evidence (Schulz, 2007: p. 18). Despite much research into ef- fective strategies and approaches to teaching and assessing in- tercultural competency in foreign language classrooms (partic- ularly in the United States), several challenges have been put forward. One such challenge is that of sensitizing students to the value of seeing the world through the language/culture of another and creating a more affective climate for developing intercultural competency in an environment where a mono- lingual monocultural national linguistic identity rules at home and global English rules abroad (Fonseca-Greber, 2010: p. 117).
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applying their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) as listed in English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of n[r]

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Avyaya Analyzer: Analysis of Indeclinables using Finite State Transducers

Avyaya Analyzer: Analysis of Indeclinables using Finite State Transducers

This system relates the root and linguistic features to the surface form through a set of transformations. 2000 verbal roots, 120 krt suffixes (out of which four suffixes are related to avyayas), 26 upasargas/prefixes and nearly 500 upapadas were collected. With the combination of all these upapadas, prefixes, roots and suffixes, we can generate a large number of avyayas which are not productive [9]. The upapada, upasarga, root and suffixes acquire different forms due to euphonic transformations between them. Hence, each and every possible phonetic change of roots, suffixes, upasargas, and upapadas were written manually 5 along with the necessary linguistic features. Morphological dictionaries for upapadas, upasargas, roots and suffixes were created. An example of the possible phonetic changes in upapada, upasarga, root and suffix are given below. The second field indicates the lemma and the first field indicates all possible phonetic changes of the second field in context of euphonic change. For computational purpose, the data is presented in WX transliteration scheme. There are several converters available to convert the text from Roman to Unicode and vice-versa.
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Conversion of some soil types, subtypes, and varieties between the Taxonomic Classification System of Soils of the Czech Republic and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources

Conversion of some soil types, subtypes, and varieties between the Taxonomic Classification System of Soils of the Czech Republic and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources

During the soil classification systems correla- tion and soil profiles conversions between these systems is it necessary to keep permanently in mind that WRB lays stress mainly on the proper- ties of the individual soil profiles, whereby TKSP CR emphasises rather the properties of higher categories, especially the referential classes of soils. It is possible to deduce that extending WRB is simpler compared to TKSP CR. The referential soil group or prefixes and suffixes can be more easily added to a key than, for example, new ref- erential class of soils to TKSP CR, which should be carefully integrated and complexly linked to other categories, because of the strict abiding by mutual exclusivity of individual categories.
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The Marked Nominative in Dhaashatee - the Language of the Burji in Southern Ethiopia

The Marked Nominative in Dhaashatee - the Language of the Burji in Southern Ethiopia

However, while talking to members of the Burji community during my fieldwork, it turned out that they prefer the term “Dhaashatee” for their language. This is in line with Amborn's (2009: 35) observations. Degu Sode (p. c.), the director of the Dhaashatee Department at the College for Teacher Education in Dilla, confirmed that the term “Burji” refers to the people only and should not be used for the language. Other speakers, who were interrogated about the topic independently, agreed. Given that there seems to be such a strong preference for “Dhaashatee” , it is surprising that no linguistic publication appears to use the term. This also holds for theses written by Ethiopian scholars, such as Tesfaye Baye Assefa, whose PhD thesis with the title A descriptive grammar of Burji does not even mention “Dhaashatee” as an alternative name for the language. 5
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(MIRP) Monitoring Independent Reading Practice

(MIRP) Monitoring Independent Reading Practice

LA.A.1.2.3 The student uses simple strategies to determine meaning and increase vocabulary for reading, including the use of prefixes, suffixes, root words, multiple meanin[r]

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English Appendix 2: Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation

English Appendix 2: Vocabulary, grammar and punctuation

important, as it gives us more conscious control and choice in our language. Building this knowledge is best achieved through a focus on grammar within the teaching of reading, writing and speaking. Once pupils are familiar with a grammatical concept [for example ‘modal verb’], they should be encouraged to apply and explore this concept in the grammar of their own speech and writing and to note where it is used by others. Young pupils, in particular, use more complex language in speech than in writing, and teachers should build on this, aiming for a smooth transition to sophisticated writing.
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A CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN PREFIXES AND SUFFIXES IN THE DESCRIPTIVE TEXTS OF STUDENT’S TEXTBOOKS

A CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN PREFIXES AND SUFFIXES IN THE DESCRIPTIVE TEXTS OF STUDENT’S TEXTBOOKS

The generic structure of a descriptive text are as follows: (1) identification: an introduction to the subject of the description; (2) description of features: describe the characteristic features of the subject. While the language features of a descriptive text are follows: (1) use of particular nouns; (2) use of detailed noun groups to provide information about the subject; (3) use of a variety of types of adjectives; (4) use of relating verbs to provide information about the subject; (5) use of thinking and feeling verbs to express the writer’s personal view about the subject or to give an insight into the subject’s thoughts and feelings; (6) use of action verbs to describe the subject’s behavior; (7) use of adverbials to provide more information about this behavior; (8) use of similes, metaphors and other types of figurative language, particularly in literary descriptions.
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A Linguistic Overview of the Patronymic and Gender Names amongst the Selected African Communities

A Linguistic Overview of the Patronymic and Gender Names amongst the Selected African Communities

Patronymic names amongst the Dutch people also manifest the usage of suffixes such as {-son} and {-daughter}. For instance, Wilfred son of Lutgar will be referred to as Wilfred Lutgarson, and Cornelia daughter of Hendrick will be named as Cornelia Hendriksdaughter [11]. Besides patronymic system of naming, the Dutch also tend to give names depending on one’s occupation, aliases and nicknames, and geographical origins. For example, one may be called Gaastra meaning a resident of a farmstead [11]. The suffix {-stra} tends to denote resident of. The use of suffix {-son} is also witnessed among the English people. For example, Robert’s son will be referred to as Robertson [1]. There are also occupational names that include John Smith and descriptive names such as John Long and John Armstrong among the English [1].
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A Finite State Approach to Translate SNOMED CT Terms into Basque Using Medical Prefixes and Suffixes

A Finite State Approach to Translate SNOMED CT Terms into Basque Using Medical Prefixes and Suffixes

As mentioned before, in this paper we show the results obtained from the translation of the medi- cal prefixes and suffixes forming the terms. That is, we have only translated the terms that have been completely identified with the medical pre- fixes and suffixes. For example, terms with the suffix “thorax” have not been translated as it does not appear in the prefixes and suffixes list. That is, the “hydropneumothorax” term has not been trans- lated even though the “hydro” and “pneumo” pre- fixes have been identified.

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How To Get A License To Practice Medicine

How To Get A License To Practice Medicine

Table 5.1: Wholly owned by one or more physicians covered by § 627.419, F.S., Subpart V(f): List the names, addresses and Florida practice license numbers (including prefixes and suffixes, if any), and the approximate percentage owned for all physicians covered by § 627.419, F.S., having an ownership interest in the applicant’s entity. (Please add additional pages if necessary)

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Language Learning Strategies Used by Successful and Unsuccessful Iranian EFL Students

Language Learning Strategies Used by Successful and Unsuccessful Iranian EFL Students

The important part language learning strategies play in second language acquisition(SLA) has been noted by many SLA researchers and also, many studies have been conducted to explore them (Rubin, 1975 and 1981; Naiman et al, 1978; O'Malley et al, 1985 and 1990; Ellis, 1985; Oxford, 1990 and Cohen, 2000). Since language is socially mediated and context dependent, it would be expected that learners' use of language learning strategies may vary with the environment. This study examines the application of language learning strategies by successful and unsuccessful Iranian EFL students. To do so, memory, cognitive, compensation, metacognitive, affective and social language learning strategies were investigated. To collect data, the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL; Oxford, 1990) was administered to successful and unsuccessful EFL students. They, then, were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The findings of the study indicated that successful EFL students used a wider range of learning strategies and different from those often preferred by their unsuccessful peers. The former often used metacognitive strategies while the latter tended to use surface level cognitive strategies. The results of this study can be beneficial for Iranian language teachers in terms of raising their awareness on narrowing the gap between the students' language learning strategies and their teaching methodologies preferences.
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National Curriculum 2014 Planning Document. Statutory Requirements. Year 5

National Curriculum 2014 Planning Document. Statutory Requirements. Year 5

Pupils should be taught to: apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), as listed in English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

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Semiotic Nature of Language Teaching Methods in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching

Semiotic Nature of Language Teaching Methods in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching

In communicative language teaching, the instructional materials play an important role. "A wide variety of materials have been used to support communicative approaches to language teaching. Unlike some contemporary methodologies such as Community Language Teaching view materials as a way of influencing the quality of classroom interaction and language use. Materials thus have a primary role of promoting communicative language use." (Richards and Rodgers, 1990:79). The materials in communicative language teaching can be studied in three groups. They are text-based, task-based and realia. In the text based materials, depending on the context of study, to start the conversation, dialogues, drills, sentence patterns, visual cues, taped cues, and pictures are used actively. In the task-based activities, a variety of interactional patterns like, pair work, group work, games, role plays. In this respect, the cue-cards, pictures and the activity cards are actively used as the semiotic elements of the course. In terms of realia, as is clear, the communicative language teaching requires the use of authentic and from life materials in the classroom. These materials can be in the form of; language-based realia, such as signs, magazines, advertisements and their symbols, graphics and statistics. (i.e. maps, pictures, charts, symbols)
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A statistical model for morphology inspired by the Amis language

A statistical model for morphology inspired by the Amis language

We introduce a statistical model for the morphology of natural languages. As words contain a root and potentially a prefix and a suffix, we associate three vector components, one for the root, one for the prefix, and one for the suffix. As the morphology captures important semantic notions and syntactic instructions, a new Content vector c can be associated with the sentences. It can be computed online and used to find the most likely derivation tree in a grammar. The model was inspired by the analysis of Amis, an Austronesian language with a rich morphology.

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The Ways of Using Mother Tongue in English Language Teaching

The Ways of Using Mother Tongue in English Language Teaching

The table shows that all students (100 %) who participated in the study think that Croatian should be used in the classroom. The vast majority of students (97 %) like it when their teachers use some Croatian. According to students, Croatian was most necessary to explain complex grammar points (97 %) and to help define some new vocabulary items (90 percent). In choosing the open-ended “Other” option about when it is necessary to use Croatian in the EFL classroom, a few students indicated that the L1 could be used to translate well-written paragraphs and to compare the two languages. In explaining why they think the use of Croatian is necessary in EFL classes, the majority of student participants (81%) indicate that it helps them to understand difficult concepts better. 70 % answered that Croatian was necessary to understand new vocabulary items better. Surprising 43 % of the students responded that they felt less lost. This figure is significantly smaller than the corresponding student responses in Schweer’s study, in which 68.3 percent of the students preferred the use of the L1 in order to feel less lost (1999:8). A possible explanation for this difference is that the students’ English language proficiency level in my study was slightly higher than in Schweer’s. The few students who chose the open-ended “Other” option for why it is necessary to use the L1 indicated that Croatian could be used to understand jargon and to improve their translation ability. More than half of the students (61 percent) think Croatian should be used in the classroom “sometimes.” Concerning how much time Croatian should be used in the English class, 73 percent of the students answered the amount of Croatian used should range from 10 to 50 percent of class time, and 27 percent of the students answered it should be from 60 to 90 percent of class time. The questionnaire results show that the use of Croatian language is justified in first year EFL classes. It is especially useful for language tasks such as defining vocabulary items, practicing the use of phrases and expressions, and explaining grammar rules and some important ideas. Students prefer the use of Croatian because it enhances their comprehension of new concepts and new vocabulary items and can aid comprehension.
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Disabled person's control, communication and entertainment aid : an investigation of the feasibility of using speech control and natural language understanding to control a manipulator and a software application and development environment

Disabled person's control, communication and entertainment aid : an investigation of the feasibility of using speech control and natural language understanding to control a manipulator and a software application and development environment

After ensuring that the dictionary contained one basic form of a word, often the verb or noun, rules for the addition of prefixes and suffixes were used to produce additional words fro[r]

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SAMPLE BOOKLET Published July 2015

SAMPLE BOOKLET Published July 2015

Commentary: This question assesses adjectives. It requires pupils to know the term and to form an adjective of their own from a given root word in order to answer the question correctly. Correct spelling is required for the award of the mark; this is the case with all questions in which pupils have to form words from a given root word or add prefixes or suffixes to a given word.

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