Top PDF Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

This has not, of course, meant complete autonomy. But it has meant a con- siderable degree of independence, allowing us to fund the writing centre se- curely and at the same time implement efficiencies that take disciplinary ideals into account. Originally, for instance, centre administration and the teaching of tutors required the time of two instructors; when we created a permanent staff position for the Computer Writing Lab, we not only freed up faculty time but also gained technological expertise and more efficient management of tutoring appointments. The decision to rely on paid tutoring also resulted in greater ef- ficiency and helped compensate for the diminishment of WAC. At one time, the opportunity to tutor was available only to students taking an array of practi- cum courses, an arrangement that reduced our pool of tutors to Education and English students, prioritized the learning of the tutor over the learning of the tutee, limited tutoring time available to a few weeks each term (usually, Fall and Winter terms only), and drew heavily on department teaching resources. Combining paid tutoring with much shorter preparation courses opened the door to a wider range of students (including those in requirement-heavy science programs), increased tutoring hours, and significantly reduced the demands on faculty time. As a result, we now attract peer tutors from across the disciplines, well-prepared to address the diversity of student need (two-thirds of those who come to the Centre have been referred by colleagues in other departments). One faculty member alone is responsible for teaching, hiring, and supervising tutors and for what we might call “public relations”: asking our colleagues to let good writers know about tutoring opportunities, weak students about op- portunities for help, and keeping them well-informed about the principles and benefits of peer tutoring.
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Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

This has not, of course, meant complete autonomy. But it has meant a con- siderable degree of independence, allowing us to fund the writing centre se- curely and at the same time implement efficiencies that take disciplinary ideals into account. Originally, for instance, centre administration and the teaching of tutors required the time of two instructors; when we created a permanent staff position for the Computer Writing Lab, we not only freed up faculty time but also gained technological expertise and more efficient management of tutoring appointments. The decision to rely on paid tutoring also resulted in greater ef- ficiency and helped compensate for the diminishment of WAC. At one time, the opportunity to tutor was available only to students taking an array of practi- cum courses, an arrangement that reduced our pool of tutors to Education and English students, prioritized the learning of the tutor over the learning of the tutee, limited tutoring time available to a few weeks each term (usually, Fall and Winter terms only), and drew heavily on department teaching resources. Combining paid tutoring with much shorter preparation courses opened the door to a wider range of students (including those in requirement-heavy science programs), increased tutoring hours, and significantly reduced the demands on faculty time. As a result, we now attract peer tutors from across the disciplines, well-prepared to address the diversity of student need (two-thirds of those who come to the Centre have been referred by colleagues in other departments). One faculty member alone is responsible for teaching, hiring, and supervising tutors and for what we might call “public relations”: asking our colleagues to let good writers know about tutoring opportunities, weak students about op- portunities for help, and keeping them well-informed about the principles and benefits of peer tutoring.
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NOTES ON INFORMAL STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMIC WRITING TRAINING

NOTES ON INFORMAL STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMIC WRITING TRAINING

Depending on cultural and educational traditions, universities worldwide are dealing with this issue in different manners, either by establishing academic writing centers and/or by offering courses and training programs. A search performed on the top 100 1 universities shows that all of them offer organized training for Academic Writing skills development in some form. In this context, at Babeș-Bolyai University of Cluj Napoca, an interdisciplinary Academic Writing research project is trying to assess the optimal manner to approach academic writing skills development taking into account Romanian realities. While certain general aspects related to academic writing can be taught within a course, there are several particularities related to specific disciplines and also to Romanian language and cultural traditions that have to be also taken into account.
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International Advances in Writing Research: Cultures, Places, Measures

International Advances in Writing Research: Cultures, Places, Measures

As these projects also illustrate, discussions about what research counts, how research will be used, and how program effectiveness is determined are not academic, abstract, or carried out only in scholarly journals and conferences. Everyday, K-12 researchers, teachers, and students experience the repercussions extending from the privileging of experimental research as evidenced through the NRP and ensuing policies. As educational reform continues to be cham- pioned through federal programs such as Race to the Top and the “voluntary” Common Core State Standards Initiative that it endorses, policymakers could look to research like that conducted through the NWP, VALUE and inter-insti- tutional assessments to learn more about how to use research and assessment in ways that position teachers as professionals who take responsibility for student learning and who care about what students are learning and to what degree. Approaching research and assessment in this way recognizes teachers’ expertise and promotes research and assessment as means of professional development. It values the knowledge and experience that teachers have, yet it still enforces research standards and allows comparability, providing information that helps educators and the public understand how students are performing. As US poli- cymakers push to make the transition from K-12 and college education more seamless for students, encouraging research and assessment that goes beyond experimental and quasi-experimental methods will provide a richer and more complete understanding of both teaching and learning. Relying on a narrowly defined, top down approach will misrepresent not only what students know and can do but also what it means to write and to teach writing.
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Student writing and academic literacy
development at university

Student writing and academic literacy development at university

Data from Higher Education Statistics Agency (2017) indicate that dropout and non-completion in UK HEIs rates are rising. Non-continuation is highest within two groups: eighteen to nineteen year olds from disadvan- taged backgrounds and mature age students. Research recently conducted by the Higher Education Funding Council for England revealed that one in five students does not progress straight to year two; attrition is highest among students from under-represented social groups (Else, 2017). The recruiting and teaching intensive institutions have the highest rates of non-continuation. Secondly, evidence that students are being effectively welcomed and inducted into higher education is contradicted by the exponential rise in illicit services such as ‘essay-mills’. At the time of writing, it has been announced that universities will be required to be more strigent in tackling these problems. However, higher education has no constructive and effective solution to plagiarism and academic misconduct. Software detection and sanctions do not constitute education; only the latter will properly address this problem. As Haggis (2006) pointed out, we need to look at how aspects of the curriculum and traditional practices may militate against participation, and adjust. Thirdly, whilst universities will continue to be regulated by government agencies for the quality and standards of their provision and how they address the student experi- ence, the withdrawal of the block grant to support teaching makes them more directly responsible for developing their learning and teaching practices than at any time in the past. The TEF is a new horizon which offers opportunities, but it has yet to bed down. As it does, it is likely to emphasise the quality and enhancement of teaching and learning within curricula. The newly established Office for Students (OfS), which now directs the TEF, has announced that it is a ‘priority’ to reduce dropout rates and ‘improve students’ chances of achieving a good degree regardless of (social) background’ (Pells, 2018). Public opinion will exert pressure on policy makers to require HEIs to demonstrate learning gain of their students in tangible and manifest ways across areas of study (cf. Arum and Roska, 2011). But this is also a precarious time for HEIs. In the current higher education market place and changing higher education landscape there may be a tendency for resources to be moved away from front line teaching and learning to marketing and customer care, strengthening an orientation towards the student as customer as competition amongst the recruiting institutions intensifies (Temple et al., 2016).
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Medical Writing Programs and university of Colorado (UCB)

Medical Writing Programs and university of Colorado (UCB)

http://www.aejmc.org/jobads/ and https://chronicle.com/section/jobs/61. Each year since 1989, researchers at the University of Georgia have monitored trends in journalism/mass communication (JMC) education by surveying a scientific sample of the nearly 500 post- secondary programs in the United States and their more than 50,000 students. The latest report, for 2012, shows that enrollment in the nation’s PhD programs in JMC had risen to 1,887 in 2012, compared to 394 in 1988. But do these JMC doctoral students find work? The latest Georgia study showed that the number of full-time faculty in JMC has increased from 4,126 in 1989 to 7,448 in 2012. Moreover, a reading of the 45 “Journalism” faculty positions announced in September 2013 on the website of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication shows that 35 announcements (78.8 percent) required the PhD and an additional four (8.9 percent) listed the doctorate as “preferred.” The proposed program will meet this market need squarely. Finally, a review of PhD programs nationwide reveals that, of the 32 doctoral programs in journalism/mass communication with enrollments above 25, only three (the universities of Maryland, Missouri and Texas) offer doctoral programs that focus explicitly on journalism.
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DEVELOPING ACADEMIC WRITING IN A BUSINESS ORIENTED UNIVERSITY

DEVELOPING ACADEMIC WRITING IN A BUSINESS ORIENTED UNIVERSITY

Abstract: This research investigated the development of language choices in the Academic writing of students at an English-medium university in Thailand. The first part involved looking at the writing in the first semester of their English program at the university, representing the level of the students’ writing on entry into the university. Seventy two samples of first year students’ writing were collected, but only 12 were randomly selected for this study in order to compare their progress over a period of 14 weeks (first semester). The second part of the research looked at the writing of students’ journals at the end of their second semester of their first year after the implementation of a writing program based on research originally developed in Australia (Derewianka, 2003). A third part of the research investigated the development of students’ writing towards the third year in university with specific reference to their academic writing in the business English program. The focus on Business English was mainly because the university was well-known in this field of study. The framework for the analysis of the students’ writing was based on a systemic functional approach (Halliday and Matthiessen, 2004). In order to provide insights into the meaning and effectiveness of the text, a discourse grammar needs to be functional and semantic in its orientation. This paper discusses the development of the Nominal Group (NG) in the students’ writing in THEME position, as this was felt to be a major issue in the development of academic discourse. However NGs in the RHEME would also be looked, as this was a part of the text structure, where complex nominal groups would be expected as part of the NEW information. The resulting analysis showed that initially the students had a limited knowledge of the different genres and used an equally limited range of lexical and grammatical choices. After the implementation of a new teaching approach in the second semester of the first year, some improvement could be observed. During the third year of the English program, improvement in the writing of genres used in “business” writing, such as Reports, was clearly evident.
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Essentials of Academic Writing Octobe 19 2017

Essentials of Academic Writing Octobe 19 2017

This sentence in the introduction – I recommend three points: avoid stating a clear argument, do not organize your paper, and use big and complicated words. –[r]

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Examining the Use of Metadiscourse Markers in Academic Writing

Examining the Use of Metadiscourse Markers in Academic Writing

Acquiring proficiency in academic writing is becoming increasingly important for academics, irrespective of the academic discipline, given that publications in highly rated, peer-reviewed international journals have a profound impact on how knowledge is constructed through the process of writing. In academic writing, the use of metadiscourse markers is fundamental since academic writers have to write in such a way that they are able to skilfully distinguish opinion from fact. At the same time, they have to assess their affirmations in suitable and convincing ways. Considering the afore-mentioned, this article examines the use of metadiscourse markers in academic writing in which special attention is paid to the use of hedges and boosters. It is a general analysis and mini-review of the use of metadiscourse markers in academic writing. One empirical research article, from the field of Applied Linguistics, is used for this purpose. An introduction is given about academic writing and the need to use metadiscourse markers. Literature review based on metadiscourse markers in academic writing, with particular emphasis on hedges and boosters, is presented and discussed. The methodology of the study is outlined. The results show that there is a greater use of interactives than interactionals: with regard to interactive markers, transitional/logical connectives were most used, followed by endophoric markers, evidentials, and code glosses; with respect to interactional markers, hedges and boosters were the most used in this category with more hedges used as compared to boosters. Finally, concluding remarks are made about the analysis conducted.
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Upward Bound is College Bound : Pre-College Outreach Programs\u27 Sponsorship  of Academic Writing

Upward Bound is College Bound : Pre-College Outreach Programs\u27 Sponsorship of Academic Writing

College composition teachers and writing program administrators have also started to explore the insights pre-college outreach programs can offer for designing transitional writing courses. Moore, Pyne, & Patch (2013), for instance, profiled a collaboration between a pre- college outreach and first-year writing program to develop a special section of freshman composition for underrepresented students. The pre-college outreach program was modeled after TRIO and invited low-income and potential first-generation high school students to the campus of a local university during the summer for academic enrichment. Like TRIO, the program also offered mentorship and tutoring during the school year and additional support services once students entered college. The freshman writing class was designed to provide a culminating experience for program participants and to pilot effective first-year writing courses for the university’s special populations. The curriculum required students to write personal, analytical, and persuasive essay about their educational trajectories while also emphasizing the research and writing process. A special workshop modeled after campus writing centers also provided students with additional opportunities to use campus resources and consult with the teacher and undergraduate tutors trained in composition pedagogy. Assessment data from this study suggests that students became more familiar with the writing process but did not meet other outcomes, such as increased rhetorical awareness. Based on these findings, Moor, Pyne, and Patch concluded that similar courses would benefit from clearer expectations for tutors and students regarding the writing workshop and a longer duration.
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Determining higher education student attitudes towards engaging with online academic writing skills programs

Determining higher education student attitudes towards engaging with online academic writing skills programs

The vast majority of the respondents to these items indicated very positive attitudes towards the online PowerPlus Writing Programs. Many of the students felt apprehensive and anxious before they started, thinking that the programs would be difficult, boring or of no value to them; as they progressed, however, they found the programs to be interesting, useful and easy to use. Only a small number of respondents continued to feel frustrated and overwhelmed. While some respondents were not influenced by significant others to complete the online programs, other respondents were encouragement by significant others including their lecturers/tutors, their peers, and/or their family members; many of these significant others indicated to the students that they would like to see them improve their writing skills. A few of the respondents indicated that they wanted their significant others to feel proud of their successful academic achievements. Some of the respondents indicated that having computer literacy, familiarity with navigating websites and appropriately designed online learning environments facilitated their ability to engage with online learning; other respondents indicated that inadequate computing and Internet access facilities, balancing work, study and family commitments, and hearing and visual disabilities impeded engagement with online learning. Many of the respondents felt that they were in control of their online learning experiences. A large number of the respondents indicated that they would refer back to the online programs when writing future essays or assignments, had more time, better computing access and/or in their future profession.
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Online peer conferencing in academic writing

Online peer conferencing in academic writing

Synchronous CMC ( SCMC ) is one type of CMC . It allows users to discuss with each other online in real time. The application of SCMC to language learning is based on the socio- cognitive approach, which highlights the importance of social construction for language learning (Hymes, 1972). The purpose of language learning in SCMC focuses on meaning negotiation and knowledge co-construction. Chun (1994) found that in synchronous CMC discussion, students tend to be more involved in the discussion by asking questions and giving feedback to their peers. In terms of synchronicity, SCMC is similar to face-to-face discussion. However, in SCMC , as a result of physical absence, discussants tend to emulate the facial expressions and prosodic features in face-to-face communication in order to convey their feelings (Werry, 1996). They utilize writing conventions like capitalization and punctuation marks, such as WHAT ? or I like it!!!, to mimic intonation, stress, exclamation, etc. Moreover, they also create vivid icons to show their emotions such as ^^ (smile) and > < (anger). In other words, non-verbal cues in written forms are characteristic of SCMC .
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Traditional Academic Writing Developing Your Own Writing Style: Comments on Essay Extract

Traditional Academic Writing Developing Your Own Writing Style: Comments on Essay Extract

The lyrical poem, unforgettable play, haunting novel, powerful essay or compelling film is all collections of words. Even when writing neither seeks nor attains artistic status, for many of us it is the familiar and preferred route to self-expression and action. We use the written word to affirm and connect, to protest and defend, demand and proclaim, inform and persuade. Through writing we can explore, understand and formulate elusive and complex ideas, share information and engage in debate. This process does as much to elucidate our own thoughts as it does to communicate them to others.
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PRAGMATIC ASPECTS OF ACADEMIC WRITING  IN HEALTH CARE

PRAGMATIC ASPECTS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN HEALTH CARE

Pointing out the importance of moral and ethical values in medical sciences is extremely important due to a lot of unethical interests that nowadays often prevail in medical care. Therefore, the specific approaches of modern health care in the light of its comprehensiveness have to be explained to be applied in academic and professional communication in health care. Communication as an instrument in the treatment of the patient is an indispensible key segment in this holistic, comprehensive approach. Consequently, this significant foundation will undoubtedly help the health care practitioner to communicate verbally or in writing in an adequate manner.Exactly as stated in Naughton C. A. when refers to pharmacists (2019: 4, 6): ”Some patient-centred improvements have been made in health care services, but optimal health has not been fully realized. Only when pharmacists have a holistic understanding of an individual patient, including their experience of illness and medication, can they effectively assess appropriateness, safety, efficacy, and adherence to medications and develop realistic treatment plans. (...) In other words, “the pharmacists must maintain a high level of humility about their scientific knowledge so that the knowledge of the patient can be recognized.‟
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Lucid : a formal system for writing and proving programs

Lucid : a formal system for writing and proving programs

If rrc ITEnage to do ttr-is we have f ,A l:, B * and we can use *I to get f l=C A + B- Thus f l-g a n' We see that to r:se tlre deducbion tlreorenr rue nnrst not use arry of the Lucid ml[r]

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Hedging and academic writing: an analysis of lexical hedges

Hedging and academic writing: an analysis of lexical hedges

Appertaining to hedges, the categories modal, verb, adverb, determiner/quantifier, and noun indicated a statistically significant difference while the category of adjective did not. Besides, no statistically significant difference was detected in total use of hedges between Anglophonic and Turkish writers of English. The study is in tune with Hamamcı’s results (2007) who found that there is not a statistically significant difference between Turkish and Native writers of English. Similarly, a small scale study (Ozdemir & Longo, 2014) that compared Turkish students’ and American students’ thesis abstracts demonstrated statistically non-significant results in terms of total hedge usage. On the other hand, the present study provided a contrastive result with Uysal’s (2014) who found that Turkish writers of English used more hedges than Anglophonic writers in conference abstracts. What gave rise to this contrastive result may be because of that Uysal investigated only abstracts, and conventional writing styles of conference abstract may be absolutely different from full text writing styles because writers may assuredly use a tentative language in abstracts due to the fact that the full study had not been conducted up until then.
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Exploring Postgraduate Academic Writing Practices and Identities.

Exploring Postgraduate Academic Writing Practices and Identities.

This notion of cultural domains and practices reinforces the idea, originally formulated in Berger & Luckmann (1966), that the apparent stability and ‘givenness’ of dominant discourses and the institutions and the social realities that they support are not ‘real’ or ‘true’ in any concrete sense. Hence I argue in my research that academic writing practices, no matter how apparently ‘common-sense’ they may appear, are complex and contestable because they are actually constructed out of multiple, sedimented ‘semantic layers’ which have accrued over time (Bakhtin, 1981, p.276). Moreover, postgraduate writers negotiate these ‘semantic layers’ as ‘nomadic’ subjects who are ‘ambivalent and polyvalent’ (Lather, 2006, p.43) about the writing practices and artefacts that they constantly encounter on their doctoral research journey.
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English academic writing by Dutch engineering students1

English academic writing by Dutch engineering students1

The consequences of poorly developed communicative competence are far reaching and are likely to have an effect on the career perspective of gradu- ates. This was made apparent in the interview with the business profes- sional. He suggested that in the professional world, few people get the op- portunity to write forty-page reports and most professionals are expected to communicate their progress and findings in short, concise, and clearly written single-page summaries. In such a condensed format, the graduates’ level of communicative competence becomes a distinguishing factor and may determine the relative success of their career. One aspect that also negatively affects the value of their theses is, according to the business pro- fessional, their difficulty to distinguish between what is certain and which elements are, as of yet, uncertain. This uncertainty makes it difficult for higher management to assess the possible success and value of a proposal. In summary, the findings of this study suggest that the communicative competence of SPD graduates would benefit from improvements on mul- tiple levels. These improvements are not limited to language competence alone but students will also benefit from additional instruction on aca- demic writing. The issues discussed are likely to be the result of multiple factors and unlikely to be limited to the sample of Dutch SPD graduate students.
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Critical Multiculturalism and the Politics of Identity in Academic Writing

Critical Multiculturalism and the Politics of Identity in Academic Writing

process of the self-construction, he found that the three students displayed their critical voices in negotiating with the relatively fixed conventions of academic writing they were expected to acquire and apply in writing. Quite interestingly, despite pressure to satisfy the academic conventions, the students in many occasions exhibited resistance and instead infused their own voices, albeit sounding less academic and having the risks of being labelled as “deviant” from the academic conventions. Thus, Sugiharto‟s findings corroborate Burke‟s study that identities in English academic writing are always unstable, ambivalent, and conflictual, depending on the dynamics of social contexts of writing.
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Teaching Scientific/Academic Writing in the Digital Age

Teaching Scientific/Academic Writing in the Digital Age

There is no dispute that the digital age has affected our everyday lives in general and education in particular. This can be seen in the rapid developments in information and communication technologies (ICT), the multitude of Web-based tools available to institutions of learning, and the ever- increasing technical skills of students, all of which are changing the ways in which we teach and learn. In the field of language teaching, Warschauer (2004) states that the changes are most noticeable in written communication, where the reasons for writing and the written genres used, as well as the nature of audiences and authors, are undergoing modification, for both native and non- native writers, as a result of the proliferation and availability of ICT. In short, computer-mediated communication (CMC) has altered the way we write, the genres we use, how we send and receive information, and how we teach and learn (Barker 2002; Warschauer 2002; Warschauer 2004). Corich, Kinshuk, and Hunt (2004) note that the flexibility of e- learning and the increase in WEB- supported learning management systems have resulted in the recognition of potential applications of CMC for educational purposes. They emphasize the pedagogical value of CMC tools in general, and of online discussion forums in particular, stating that the latter encourage student collaboration on assignments, promote interaction between course participants, and enhance higher-level
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