Top PDF Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Vol. I

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Vol. I

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Vol. I

Some writing assignments focus on one simple task at a time: “Summarize the following . . .” “Compare the readings . . .” “ana- lyze,” or “argue.” When you write a simple five-paragraph essay, your mode rarely changes—you can write an introduction, thesis, body, and conclusion without explaining too many shifts in what the pa- per is “doing.” Writing at the college level and beyond often has to “do” a few things in the same text. Most involved writing assignments expect you to do at least two things. You may need to summarize/ report and respond, or (more likely) you’ll need to summarize/report, synthesize, and respond. A good introduction, as you’ve learned, needs to anticipate all of it so the reader knows what to expect. Anticipating the structure of a complex argument in I-less mode is tricky. Often, it comes out as a summary of the document that follows and is redun- dant. First person can clear that problem right up. Consider the intro- duction to this article; when I come to the part where I need to tell you what I’m going to do, I just . . . tell you what I’m going to do! My writing students usually find this rhetorical trick (or is it an un-trick?) refreshing and liberating. The same concept can be applied to transi- tions between sections and ideas: “Now that I’ve done this thing, I’d like to move into this other part of my argument . . .” I’ll use this type of transition, myself, when I move into the section of this text called, “When, and When not?”
Show more

288 Read more

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Vol. II

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Vol. II

The first thing you want to do is . . . read the gosh darn question. Really, really read it. Annotate the assignment sheet or exam prompt, or write the key question out on a separate piece of paper, so you know you’re actually reading it, and not just pretending to. (If you’re in a workplace setting, write down a list of the top things you know your audience—or your boss—wants to see.) In every essay exam I’ve ever given, somebody has not answered the question. When I say this in a class, everyone frowns or laughs at me just the way you are now, thinking, “What kind of idiot wouldn’t read the question? Certainly not me!” But someone always thinks she’s read the whole question, and understood it, when she hasn’t. Don’t be that writer. Circle the verbs: analyze, argue, describe, contrast. Underline the key terms: two causes, most important theme, main steps, post–Civil War. Read it again, and read it a third time: this is your only official clue about what your audience—the teacher—wants. On a piece of scratch paper, write out an answer to the question, in so many words: if it asks, “What are two competing explanations for language ac- quisition?” write down, “Two competing explanations for language acquisition are ___ and ___ .” In an examination setting, this may even become your opening line, since readers of essay exams rarely reward frilly introductions or cute metaphors.
Show more

366 Read more

"That women’s writing thing you do": reflections on silence, writing and academic spaces

"That women’s writing thing you do": reflections on silence, writing and academic spaces

A fortuitous encounter with a nineteenth-century text left on my desk by a thoughtful librarian led to years of contemplating the relationships between our different selves and our research. The text – part autobiographical fiction, part scientific tract – fascinated me and took my research down unexpected paths. In my early post-PhD years, this text, the questions that it provoked and my relationship to it became emblematic of a larger set of difficulties I experienced around deciding what path to follow. More than an academic struggle, writing a PhD and making choices about what to do afterwards felt like an extended crisis of authority of voice in which I wrestled to find a mode of working that had academic and personal integrity. I needed to find a space to work where there was a fit between what I do, what I believe in and the realities of needing to earn a living. Fortunately, there would not be only one pivotal encounter in the journey. A meeting with a colleague and stumbling upon a contemporary text also would come to frame my approach to developing a career and finding congruence between my researcher, teacher, activist and personal selves. To unpick the complex process of articu- lating ourselves and our research, this article explores what we can under- stand about our gendered experiences of academia through our encounters with texts. It asks, if we understand what haunts us, what affect can this have on the decisions we make about our careers. It suggests that perhaps it is the chance readings and encounters that shape our paths as much as any well laid plans.
Show more

13 Read more

Examination of Legibility and Writing Speeds of Primary School Students with Respect to Writing Disposition and Writing Style

Examination of Legibility and Writing Speeds of Primary School Students with Respect to Writing Disposition and Writing Style

It was revealed in the studies conducted [14, 8, 42] that majority of the students writing of which speed and legibility were known to be profoundly important [19,20] were not sufficient in terms of legibility. It was stated that writing skill was developed with age and education taken from school (Graham and Weintraub) and legibility levels were shaped in the fourth grade (Mojet) (cited by: [42]). Memiş and Gülsoy [33] indicated that legibility of the writings of the students reduced as grade increased. Erdoğan [17] assessed the texts written with cursive italic writing at the beginning and end of the first semester and at the end of the second semester of the first grade students using “Cursive Italic Writing Assessment Form”, and it was concluded that cursive italic writings of the students did not exhibit development in terms of legibility, and that it exhibited development in terms of writing speed. Arslan and Ilgın [2] stated as a result of their study that the students liked writing and generally they regarded their own writing as “good”. The students wanted to write with cursive italic writing, they preferred cursive italic writing because it was nicely and easily written, not because it was compulsory. In the studies conducted, it was determined that there was no relationship between attitudes of the students relating to cursive italic writing and writing speed, while there was a positive, significant relationship between cursive italic writing skill and writing speed [29].
Show more

10 Read more

Relationship Among Writing Apprehension, Writing Self-Efficacy, and Iranian EFL Learners' Writing Performance

Relationship Among Writing Apprehension, Writing Self-Efficacy, and Iranian EFL Learners' Writing Performance

6.1. Pedagogical implications The results of this study highlight the necessity for EFL instructors’ consciousness of the individual differences that may influence the performances of students on assignments. While instructors realize decreases in the performances of students, they per- haps are unaware of other factors such as apprehension or self-efficacy that may contribute to the falling performance. Understanding the com- plicatedrelations between these variables will help ESL/EFL instructors meet the needs of students and pave the way for the development of language capabilities of learners. Overall, not taking into account the effect of apprehension and self-efficacy on academic achievement may result in poor academic performance. Hence, teachers should pay more attention to students’ perceptions of their personal feeling as well as their actual competence. More specifically, new methods for teaching writing that produce less apprehension and increase writing self-efficacy are required. Both explicitly and implicitly training students to remove negative feeling and promote positive attitude about study skills could be helpful.
Show more

26 Read more

Yoga Minds, Writing Bodies: Contemplative Writing Pedagogy

Yoga Minds, Writing Bodies: Contemplative Writing Pedagogy

The data I continue to collect from my classes convinces me that approach- ing writing through yoga has the ability to increase writers’ embodied aware- ness of themselves and the world in which they live because it places their writing bodies at the center of the composing process and not at the periphery. In turn, student writers become more attentive to the other bodies to which they are connected by virtue of their shared materiality, prompting both self- and other-awareness. In other words, yoga helps students develop a corporeal orientation to themselves, to others and to the writing process by making them mindful of the ways their bodies help create meaning in their papers. They see how their bodies shape their perspectives as well as the evidence they cite to support their arguments, and they notice the physical dynamics and demands of the writing process itself. In the contemplative tradition, mindfulness is used to describe awareness of the present moment and attentiveness to experience. Rather than getting ruminatively “caught up with the ‘internal chattering’ of the mind or other contents of awareness, individuals who engage in mindful- ness practice learn to observe their thoughts, emotions, and sensations in an objective and receptive manner, focusing on the process of awareness, rather than the content” (Robins et al., 2010, p. 118). Developing mindfulness allows writers to become aware of and then monitor their thoughts and feelings. With awareness, they can begin to regulate their thoughts and emotions in produc- tive ways that transcend automatic habits and thoughtless reactions. Practices like yoga that cultivate mindfulness are not simply relaxation techniques then, but are “rather a form of mental training to reduce cognitive vulnerability to reactive modes of mind that might otherwise heighten stress and emotional dis- tress” (Bishop et al., n.d., p. 6). For instance, restorative poses such as Savasana, a supine position on the floor, encourage us to become aware of our feelings of restlessness, imbalance or rigidity so that we may release and relax into an attentive calm we might not otherwise achieve if we never consciously attended to those feelings.
Show more

216 Read more

I write, therfore I am (a writer). The future of writing in the digital age

I write, therfore I am (a writer). The future of writing in the digital age

In order for professional writers to disappear, major changes would have to occur in the publishing field, its structure and its publishing methods, but, most importantly, the concept of reading and writing would also have to be drastically revised. As far as the latter is concerned, such a revolution in thinking, driven by the widespread adoption of e-readers and new publishing methods, could, sooner or later, take place in the United States. In France, such a reversal and disruption in cultural and literary values is, for a long time to come, very unlikely. Yet writers like Ewan Morrison are concerned that the digital medium poses a serious threat to the professional category he claims he belongs to, and that the Internet and new publishing methods are to blame. But is self-publishing a novel online really such a serious threat to the survival of professional writers? Or is it rather a serious threat to the publishing industry’s status quo and those few privileged individuals who have benefited from it so far?
Show more

15 Read more

EFFECTIVE WRITING. 1 The Army s Corporate Standard for Writing 2 The Principles of Army Writing 3 The Steps in the Writing Process.

EFFECTIVE WRITING. 1 The Army s Corporate Standard for Writing 2 The Principles of Army Writing 3 The Steps in the Writing Process.

5. Package your writing for readability. Write paragraphs that average six to seven lines in length. Some paragraphs may be two inches in depth, others less than an inch, but the average paragraph should be about one inch deep (about six lines) for a single- spaced document. To further package for quick and easy understanding, use headers and illustrations to help your reader visualize your main points, and keep your document as short as you reasonably can.

10 Read more

Writing War: Veterans in the College Writing Classroom

Writing War: Veterans in the College Writing Classroom

With  the  support  of  a  Conference  on  College  Composition  and  Communication  (CCCC)  Research   Initiative  Grant,  we  investigated  the  demographics  of  Post-­‐9/11  military  veterans  who  are  entering   college  writing  courses—courses  that  are  overwhelmingly  required  for  incoming  students  and  are   typically  small  enough  for  students  to  interact  one-­‐on-­‐one  with  their  instructors  frequently.  We  also   investigated  how  college  writing  program  administrators  (WPAs)  are  addressing  this  influx  of  veterans   (when  they  are  at  all),  what  support  writing  centers  and  writing  tutors  are  offering  entry-­‐level  veteran   writers  (if  at  all),  what  alternative  sites  of  writing  are  available  to  veterans,  and  how  writing  programs   might  collaborate  with  existing  veterans’  programs  (on-­‐  or  off-­‐campus).  
Show more

12 Read more

Writing For College Writing For Life >>>CLICK HERE<<<

Writing For College Writing For Life >>>CLICK HERE<<<

New York edit my dissertation hypothesis on affirmative action asap legal cover letter for job looking for someone to do my dissertation methodology on gay marriage cheap Asbestos Writing for college writing for life Southampton, East Hertfordshire looking for someone to write research proposal on presidential terms due soon New Westminster looking for someone to write my research paper on sport now. Writing for college writing for life Jersey City. type thesis proposal on community service online good thesis statements for to kill a mockingbird order research proposal on statistics argumentative essay dream act, looking for someone to write my dissertation conclusion on traditional due soon. Writing for college writing for life Raleigh Cookshire-Eaton buy dissertation chapter on literature asap
Show more

5 Read more

The Simple Math of Writing Well: Writing for the 21st Century

The Simple Math of Writing Well: Writing for the 21st Century

I enjoy school because I am always eager to discover new sources and learn about new ideas. When I first walked into my Psychology 101 classroom, the professor opened with a discussion of the id, ego, and superego, and I was surprised to hear how many new ideas I could apply to my own understanding of the world around me. In my Archaeology 242 class, my professor told us she was visiting from a Navajo reservation in New Mexico, and it was fascinating to hear her discussions of skin walkers, pinon nuts, and hogans. As I walked to my English 210 class next, I was thrilled to see the leaves in the quad beginning to turn brilliant oranges and yellows. I stopped to feed a chipmunk the last bite of my bagel, and then I walked into Sturm Hall to meet my English professor. He lectured about books I had heard of but had never had time to read, and I left eager to find Siddhartha, The Little Red Pony, and Middlemarch. And today was only Monday!
Show more

248 Read more

Writing into design: An embedded writing course for architectural studies

Writing into design: An embedded writing course for architectural studies

deliberate and detailed than talking – clearly delineating context and audience in the process – the written medium, being a recorded form, also allows one to re-read what has been written and then revise accordingly to ensure that what is represented is logical and sequentially rendered. In this way, writing is a more ‘committed’ and ‘responsible’ act than speech (Emig 1977, 127). Emig drives this point home as follows: ‘Because writing is often our representation of the world made visible, embodying both process and product, writing is more readily a form and source of learning than talking’ (Emig 1977, 124). Writing, in generating the synergistic activity of eye, brain, and hand, brings together the three learning stages outlined by Jerome Bruner, namely enactive, where one learns ‘by doing’ (here, generally, the hand is instrumental in actualising this learning process), iconic where learning takes place by depicting something via an image (here, the eye plays an important role) and symbolic, where one learns by restating something in words (here, the brain dominates in this type of learning) (Emig 1977, 124). Emig postulates that ‘[i]f the most efficacious learning occurs when learning is reinforced, then writing through its inherent re-inforcing cycle involving hand, eye, and brain marks a uniquely powerful multi-representational mode for learning’ (Emig 1977, 124 ‒125). Writing represents an embodied and ‘self-rhythmed’ personal learning practice (Emig 1977, 126).
Show more

17 Read more

Writing Time: A Rhythmic Analysis of Contemporary Academic Writing

Writing Time: A Rhythmic Analysis of Contemporary Academic Writing

Bukowski’s possessed writer and Barthes’ never-dormant Muse crystallize the myth of that suspended zone of intellectual or artistic retreat that typically culminates in an intense, nearly transcendent creative outpouring. Yet the time, spaces and atmospheres surrounding our intellectual production leave a rich reservoir of material and affective traces in our writing, determining its quality and conditioning our experience of it, for better or worse. That is why Sword turns her scholarly gaze away from the aesthetic of academic prose to the lived experience of (exemplary) writers. Far from challenging the imperatives of publish or perish, the author provides a guide for surviving them, along with an array of tricks designed to help thrive in them. She takes as an example – and beacon of hope– the impressive academic records of roughly a hundred prolific writers scattered around the globe. Notwithstanding well-crafted attempts to argue in favour of more holistic, tailor-made strategies to overcome writer’s blocks or carve out fragments of quiet time-space within which to produce, the reader-writer can hardly forget the damning mirage of the ‘Grafton line’, named after a famous historian who is known to write 3,500 words every morning. Even less can they resist the temptation of measuring their own performance against that of the successful academics interviewed by Sword. The relationship with one’s writing habits and outcomes is presented as idiosyncratic and connected with personality traits rather than with feelings of pain and elation that do not necessarily match the binary of the struggling and the successful writer. That is why,
Show more

46 Read more

The Correlation Between the Students’ Writing Motivation and the Writing Ability

The Correlation Between the Students’ Writing Motivation and the Writing Ability

In relation with the explanation above, motivation is one of important aspects in writing. Without a strong motivation, students will be difficult to do writing activity. Theoretically, motivation is all of inner power reinforcing any person to do something. So, writing motivation is an inner power that determines successful writing activity. The students need motivation in writing, because with motivation they will active to do writing activity. Even though they will find many problems such as structure grammar, diction, spelling, vocabulary and punctuation. In writing, the students are able to make a good composition. It proves that motivation needed by students in writing.
Show more

18 Read more

Students’ Use of Summary in a Writing about Writing Class

Students’ Use of Summary in a Writing about Writing Class

Writing about Writing (WAW) is a loosely circumscribed approach to first-year writing that puts writing studies at the center of the course. The ap- proach was probably publicized most with the appearance of the textbook Writ- ing About Writing : A College Reader [15], which is the textbook assigned in the classes described in the present study, but was around well before 2011. Downs & Wardle [16] characterize the WAW approach as “Introduction to Writing Studies”. Because Writing Studies is a diverse field, with many interests and me- thodologies, a first-year writing class following a WAW model can likewise take any number of diverse approaches. The point is that in a WAW course the focus “is always writing: how people use writing, how people learn to write, how ge- nres mediate work in society, how ‘discourse communities’ affect language use, how writing changes across the disciplines, and so on. The research is about language, the discussions are about language, and the goal of the course is to teach students the content of our discipline” [17]. Wardle [17] argues that, be- cause writing is such a complex activity that occurs within and is deeply affected by relevant activity systems, there is no possibility of teaching general writing skills. There is no such thing as writing in general, or even academic writing in general. Therefore, “specialized writing is best taught by reflective insiders who know the genres and their content, in the activity systems where those genres mediate (and are informed and shaped by) meaningful activities” [17]. This calls for a rigorous WAC strategy, which would help students write like a scholar in their fields of study. The role of FYW, to address its institutional mandate, to be ethically responsive to the needs of students, and to continue the scholarly mis- sions of the field, is to teach students something about what it means to be a scholar, what it means to engage with experts in a field, as an expert. Wardle’s critiques of FYW’s mission to teach general writing skills in fact resonates with David Bartholomae’s [18] argument that the work of academic writing instruc- tion is at least in part identity work, teaching students how to recognize and mimic the conventions of academic discourse.
Show more

21 Read more

Yoga Minds, Writing Bodies: Contemplative Writing Pedagogy

Yoga Minds, Writing Bodies: Contemplative Writing Pedagogy

It is precisely this agentive impulse that generates Hindman’s argument in Making Writing Matter wherein she argues against the theoretical status quo that insists our rhetorical realties are more important or genuine than our em- bodied realities. In this article, Hindman uses her own lived experience as an alcoholic to argue against such already-formed “expert” ideas that our identities are ideological constructions that interpolate us into certain master narratives. Instead, she insists she is unwilling to transcend the body she knows has a reality outside of discourse; that the rhetoric of alcoholism helped to define an embod- ied reality she was living long before she ever stepped foot into an AA meeting and began to accept their language of recovery. Hindman concedes that when she constructs herself as an alcoholic, she is submitting herself to a discourse, but she argues that this is an empowering choice, or a “way I could hope to es- cape the deterministic and bleak physical aspects” of being an alcoholic (2001, p. 99). In other words, in choosing to control what it means to be an alcoholic and taking the language that labels to make it enable, Hindman creates a kind of embodied agency within language. Her body is a source of agency and power, allowing her to escape the dominant yet negative understanding of alcoholism and to recognize the role of her flesh in making meaning and, especially in this case, in the process of revision (ie., her revision of the alcoholic’s identity narra- tive). To the extent that we see our own students as “recovering alcoholics” who abuse the comforts of the status quo by ignoring the ways in which they might be interpolated by their cultures and societies and relying too heavily on emo- tional discourse as opposed to alcohol, we may treat them as Hindman fears: as pawns of ideology who need to be taught to appropriate the theories of experts in order to complete smart social analysis. Incorporating attention to extension may encourage students’ development of an emotional flexibility that validates their embodied feelings. In turn, they can enter into discourse communities as bodies with resistances, the first of which is feeling itself.
Show more

218 Read more

A Comparative Study of Writing Quality in Online and Conventional Writing

A Comparative Study of Writing Quality in Online and Conventional Writing

In Online Collaborative Learning, the process of building knowledge societies and the process of sharing ideas and feedback among members who work together across cultural boundaries is considered to be one of the highest levels of construction. In addition, Hayes (1996) suggested that writing is a communicative act that requires a social context and a medium. A writing environment should include a social context, audience, and other texts the writers may read while writing. Writing is mainly a social activity because it is not only used for communicative purposes but it is also a social artifact that is carried out in a social setting (Hayes, 1996). In other words, the genres in which we write were invented by other writers, and the phrases we write reflect phrases earlier writers have written.
Show more

13 Read more

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Writing about Film

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Writing about Film

From an ideological perspective, any cultural creation or product arises from and contributes to a system of ideas on how the world is or should be seen and how people in this world should or do see each other within it. In analytical writing with this approach, begin by identifying what you determine to be the message or messages the film aims to convey about the world. Ideological criticism avoids limiting itself to the content or obvious politics of a film; instead, sophisticated ideological criticism analyzes a film’s formal elements to see if they support or undermine any stated or apparent message.
Show more

5 Read more

GRADUATE WRITING GROUPS: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO WRITING PRODUCTIVITY

GRADUATE WRITING GROUPS: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO WRITING PRODUCTIVITY

While scholarly productivity research addresses the difficulties of motivation and lack of discipline that graduate students encounter while writing, composition studies research on peer response groups can help graduate students overcome the feelings of isolation in the writing process. Peer response groups are small, student-managed groups that meet to review and discuss one another’s writing. These groups capitalize on the social nature of learning and writing (Vygotsky 1978) by promoting peer interaction and the negotiation of meaning (Bruffee 1984). They can be especially useful in helping students become better writers overall, not just in improving a single piece of writing (North 1984). For instance, Zhu (1995) points out that peer response groups can help members develop audience awareness, develop motivation for revision, and clarify their own perceptions of their writing through multiple perspectives; all of which are skills that can transfer across writing tasks. More recent research has even shown that in peer response groups, those who provide feedback learn as much or more as those who receive it (Lundstrom and Baker 2009), meaning that the interactional exchanges in peer response help both the feedback receiver and giver. Furthermore, peer response groups can provide a support system in which writers can hold each other accountable for consistent writing and motivate each other to write more, a method espoused in the Publish & Flourish program that helps faculty members hold themselves accountable for writing by recording their daily writing time and meeting weekly for a one hour feedback session (Gray 2010). Gray’s research and program have found popularity and success among faculty, though it has not been extended to graduate students. Such a system of forming peer groups to engage in consistent writing and feedback provides the community support graduate writers need to overcome their feelings of isolation and helps provide the accountability and discipline called for by the field of scholarly productivity.
Show more

11 Read more

English/Writing: ENGL-100: Essay Writing ENGL-101: College Writing ENGL-105: Advanced College Writing

English/Writing: ENGL-100: Essay Writing ENGL-101: College Writing ENGL-105: Advanced College Writing

All incoming First-Year students must take a writing placement test administered by the Department. Registration in ENGL-100: Essay Writing may be required based on the results of the test. ENGL-100 does NOT satisfy the general education requirement in writing; how- ever, the 3 credits earned may be used as elective credits towards graduation. Students completing ENGL-100 with a grade of C- or bet- ter will register for ENGL-101: College Writing the following semester.

16 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...