Oracle Cloud. Using Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service E

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Oracle

®

Cloud

Using Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service E48368-20

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Oracle Cloud Using Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service, E48368-20

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Contents

Preface

... ix

Audience ... ix

Related Documents... ix

Conventions... ix

1 Getting Started with Database as a Service

About Oracle Database Cloud Service Offerings... 1-1

About Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service ... 1-2

About Database as a Service Instances ... 1-3

Service Level ... 1-3

Billing Frequency... 1-4

Oracle Database Release Version ... 1-4

Oracle Database Edition ... 1-4

Computing Power ... 1-5

Database Storage ... 1-6

Automatic Backup Configuration... 1-6

Before You Begin with Database as a Service... 1-6

How to Begin with Database as a Service Subscriptions ... 1-7

About Database as a Service Roles and Users ... 1-8

Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console ... 1-8

Typical Workflow for Using Database as a Service... 1-9

2 Managing the Life Cycle of Database as a Service Instances

Creating a Database as a Service Instance... 2-1

Viewing All Database as a Service Instances... 2-7

Viewing Detailed Information for a Database as a Service Instance... 2-8

Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Database as a Service Instance... 2-8

Restarting a Database as a Service Compute Node ... 2-12

Deleting a Database as a Service Instance... 2-12

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3 Managing Network Access to a Database as a Service Instance

About Network Access to a Database as a Service Instance ... 3-1

Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/Private Key Pair... 3-2

Generating an SSH Key Pair on UNIX and UNIX-Like Platforms Using the ssh-keygen

Utility... 3-2

Generating an SSH Key Pair on Windows Using the PuTTYgen Program... 3-3

Creating an SSH Tunnel to a Compute Node Port ... 3-4

Creating an SSH Tunnel Using the ssh Utility on Linux... 3-4

Creating an SSH Tunnel Using the PuTTY Program on Windows ... 3-5

Enabling Access to a Compute Node Port ... 3-7

Defining a Custom Host Name or Domain Name for Database as a Service... 3-9

Using Network Encryption and Integrity ... 3-10

4 Administering Database as a Service Instances

Scaling a Database as a Service Instance ... 4-1

Updating the Cloud Tooling on a Database as a Service Instance ... 4-4

Updating the Cloud Tooling on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance Databases... 4-4

Updating the Cloud Tooling on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases... 4-5

Maintaining the Manageability of Your Database as a Service Instance... 4-5

Administering Oracle REST Data Services (formerly Oracle APEX Listener)... 4-6

Administering Oracle GlassFish Server ... 4-7

Loading Data into the Oracle Database in a Database as a Service Instance... 4-9

Tuning Performance of the Oracle Database in a Database as a Service Instance ... 4-10

Monitoring and Managing the Database in a Database as a Service Instance... 4-10

Creating a Database on a Virtual Image Service Instance ... 4-11

Creating a Database on a Virtual Image Service Instance: Example ... 4-11

5 Accessing a Database as a Service Instance

Connecting to a Compute Node Through Secure Shell (SSH)... 5-1

Connecting to a Compute Node Using the ssh Utility on UNIX and UNIX-Like Platforms ... 5-1

Connecting to a Compute Node Using the PuTTY Program on Windows... 5-2

Accessing Enterprise Manager Database Express 12c... 5-4

Accessing Enterprise Manager 11g Database Control ... 5-5

Accessing the Oracle Pluggable Database Self-Service Provisioning Application ... 5-6

Connecting Remotely to the Database by Using Oracle Net Services ... 5-7

Accessing the Oracle GlassFish Server Administration Console... 5-9

6 Backing Up and Restoring a Database as a Service Instance

About Backing Up a Database as a Service Instance ... 6-1

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Creating an On-Demand Backup on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance Databases ... 6-3

Creating an On-Demand Backup on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases... 6-4

Deleting a Backup of a Database as a Service Instance ... 6-4

Updating the Password for Backing Up to the Storage Cloud ... 6-5

Updating the Password on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance Databases ... 6-5

Updating the Password on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases ... 6-6

Customizing the Current Backup Configuration... 6-6

Customizing the Current Backup Configuration on Service Instances Hosting

Single-Instance Databases... 6-7

Customizing the Current Backup Configuration on Service Instances Hosting Oracle

RAC Databases... 6-10

Changing the Backup Configuration to a Different Backup Destination... 6-12

Changing the Backup Configuration on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance

Databases ... 6-13

Changing the Backup Configuration on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases ... 6-15

Increasing Local Storage for Backups on Older Service Instances... 6-16

Disabling and Re-enabling Scheduled Backups... 6-19

Restoring a Database as a Service Instance from a Backup ... 6-20

Restoring from a Backup on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance Databases... 6-20

Restoring from the Most Recent Backup... 6-22

Restoring from a Specific Backup ... 6-22

Restoring from a Specific Long-Term Backup ... 6-23

Restoring an Instance Using the mrec Utility ... 6-24

Restoring from a Backup on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases ... 6-26

Restoring from the Most Recent Backup... 6-27

Restoring to a Specific Point in Time... 6-27

7 Patching Database as a Service

Checking Prerequisites Before Applying a Patch ... 7-1

Checking Prerequisites by Using the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console... 7-2

Checking Prerequisites by Using the dbpatchm Subcommand ... 7-3

Applying a Patch ... 7-3

Applying a Patch by Using the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console... 7-3

Applying a Patch on Service Instances Hosting Single-Instance Databases ... 7-5

Applying a Patch on Service Instances Hosting Oracle RAC Databases ... 7-6

Rolling Back a Patch or Failed Patch... 7-7

Rolling Back a Patch or Failed Patch by Using the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console ... 7-8

Rolling Back a Patch or Failed Patch by Using the dbpatchm Subcommand ... 7-10

Applying a Patch to a Test Instance... 7-12

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The dbpatchm.cfg Configuration File... 7-14

8 Configuring Database Features, Database Options, and Companion Products

Using Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) in Database as a Service ... 8-1

Using Hybrid Columnar Compression (HCC) in Database as a Service ... 8-3

Using Tablespace Encryption in Database as a Service ... 8-3

Creating Encrypted Tablespaces... 8-3

Managing Tablespace Encryption... 8-4

Using Oracle Application Express in Database as a Service ... 8-5

Accessing the Oracle Application Express Administration Console... 8-5

Accessing the Oracle Application Express Home Page... 8-7

Upgrading from Oracle Application Express 4.2 to 5.0 in Database as a Service... 8-8

Migrating from Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service to Oracle Database Cloud - Database Schema Service ... 8-11

Migrating from Oracle Database Cloud - Database Schema Service to Oracle Database

Cloud - Database as a Service ... 8-12

Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control with Database as a Service... 8-13

Using the Oracle Pluggable Database Self-Service Provisioning Application ... 8-14

9 Migrating an On-Premises Oracle Database to Oracle Database Cloud

Choosing a Migration Method... 9-1

Migrating from Oracle Database 11g to Oracle Database 11g in the Cloud ... 9-2

Migrating from Oracle Database 11g to Oracle Database 12c in the Cloud... 9-3

Migrating from Oracle Database 12c CDB to Oracle Database 12c in the Cloud... 9-4

Migrating from Oracle Database 12c Non-CDB to Oracle Database 12c in the Cloud... 9-6

Migration Methods... 9-7

Data Pump Conventional Export/Import ... 9-8

Data Pump Full Transportable... 9-10

Data Pump Transportable Tablespace ... 9-10

Remote Cloning a PDB ... 9-14

Remote Cloning Non-CDB... 9-14

RMAN Cross-Platform Transportable PDB ... 9-15

RMAN Cross-Platform Transportable Tablespace Backup Sets... 9-15

RMAN Transportable Tablespace with Data Pump ... 9-16

RMAN CONVERT Transportable Tablespace with Data Pump... 9-18

SQL Developer and INSERT Statements to Migrate Selected Objects ... 9-22

SQL Developer and SQL*Loader to Migrate Selected Objects ... 9-22

Unplugging/Plugging a PDB... 9-23

Unplugging/Plugging Non-CDB ... 9-23

10 Using Oracle DBaaS Monitor

About Oracle DBaaS Monitor ... 10-1

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Filtering the Display on DBaaS Monitor Pages ... 10-3

Starting and Stopping the Database Instance... 10-3

Starting the Database Instance ... 10-4

Stopping the Database Instance ... 10-4

Viewing and Modifying Initialization Parameters ... 10-4

Viewing Alert Log Entries and Checking for Errors ... 10-5

Viewing Tablespace and Segment Space Usage... 10-5

Administering the Listener ... 10-6

Viewing Listener Status Information ... 10-6

Starting the Listener ... 10-7

Stopping the Listener... 10-7

Verifying that the Listener Knows of a Service... 10-7

11 Frequently Asked Questions for Database as a Service

12 Troubleshooting Database as a Service

Problems Creating Instances... 12-2

Problems Accessing Instances... 12-3

Problems with Scaling... 12-3

Problems with Patching and Rollback... 12-4

Problems with Backing Up and Restoring... 12-4

A Characteristics of a Newly Created Database as a Service Instance

Characteristics of an Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance ... A-1

Virtual Machine and System Characteristics ... A-1

Oracle Database Characteristics... A-4

Oracle GlassFish Server Characteristics... A-4

Location of Diagnostic and Log Files ... A-4

Oracle Compute Cloud Service Resources ... A-5

Characteristics of an Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Using Oracle RAC ... A-7

Characteristics of an Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image Instance ... A-12

Virtual Machine and System Characteristics ... A-12

Oracle Compute Cloud Service Resources ... A-14

B Oracle Cloud Pages for Administering Database as a Service

Oracle Database Cloud Service Services Page... B-1

Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview Page... B-3

Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Administration Page ... B-5

Create Database Cloud Service Instance: Subscription Type Page ... B-6

Create Database Cloud Service Instance: Software Release Page ... B-7

Create Database Cloud Service Instance: Software Edition Page... B-7

Create Database Cloud Service Instance: Service Details Page ... B-8

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C The oracle-dbcs-cli Utility

Downloading and Installing the oracle-dbcs-cli Utility... C-1

Running the oracle-dbcs-cli Utility ... C-2

The Configuration File for oracle-dbcs-cli Subcommands ... C-7

The Data File for the oracle-dbcs-cli create Subcommand... C-7

D The raccli Utility

raccli apply patch... D-2

raccli create backup ... D-2

raccli create recovery... D-3

raccli describe job... D-4

raccli describe system... D-5

raccli list backup ... D-6

raccli list backupconfig ... D-7

raccli list jobs ... D-8

raccli list recovery ... D-8

raccli update backupconfig ... D-9

raccli update netsec ... D-11

raccli update rdk ... D-13

raccli update tde... D-13

E REST API for Database as a Service

Using the REST API... E-1

URL Structure ... E-1

Supported REST Methods... E-2

Security, Authentication and Authorization... E-2

Status Codes ... E-3

cURL Examples... E-4

Alphabetical Listing of Endpoints in the REST API ... E-4

REST API Reference ... E-5

Create a Service Instance... E-5

View All Service Instances ... E-10

View a Service Instance ... E-12

Stop, Start or Restart a Service Instance... E-16

Scale Up a Service Instance ... E-18

Delete a Service Instance ... E-20

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Preface

This document describes how to manage and monitor Oracle Database Cloud -Database as a Service and provides references to related documentation.

Topics

• Audience

• Related Documents

• Conventions

Audience

This document is intended for Oracle Cloud users who want to manage and monitor Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service.

Related Documents

For more information, see these Oracle resources: • Getting Started with Oracle Cloud

• Using Oracle Database Cloud Service (Database Schema) • Using Oracle Compute Cloud Service

Conventions

The following text conventions are used in this document:

Convention Meaning

boldface Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.

italic Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for which you supply particular values.

monospace Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code in

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1

Getting Started with Database as a Service

This section describes how to get started with Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service for administrators and developers.

Topics

• About Oracle Database Cloud Service Offerings

• About Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service

• About Database as a Service Instances

• Before You Begin with Database as a Service

• How to Begin with Database as a Service Subscriptions

• About Database as a Service Roles and Users

• Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console

• Typical Workflow for Using Database as a Service

About Oracle Database Cloud Service Offerings

Oracle Database Cloud Service provides the power and flexibility of the Oracle Database in the cloud with your choice of a dedicated schema with a complete development and deployment platform managed by Oracle, or dedicated database instances with full administrative control:

• Oracle Database Cloud - Database Schema Service • Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service

About Oracle Database Cloud – Database Schema Service

Oracle Database Cloud – Database Schema Service provides a complete platform for database application development. All the infrastructure for the underlying Oracle Database is inside the cloud; you do not have to perform any standard database maintenance operations.

Oracle Database Cloud – Database Schema Service subscriptions are based on schemas within an Oracle Database. Your service is limited to a single schema. Because of this schema-level isolation, you do not have the ability to perform instance-wide

modifications of configuration settings. In addition, some capabilities of the Oracle Database have been disabled in order to guarantee schema-level isolation.

Since the overall database server environment is shared between multiple tenants, you do not have access to the underlying hardware and operating system infrastructure, so

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you cannot load additional applications, store files in the file system or access the operating system environment in any way.

Finally, access to the underlying Oracle Database is through the SQL and PL/SQL programmatic interfaces. You cannot connect to a Database Schema Service service by using Oracle Net Services. You can access SQL statements and PL/SQL code through the use of RESTful Web Services, which you can define with either the RESTful Web Services wizard in Oracle Application Express or with SQL Developer.

Oracle Database Cloud – Database Schema Service provides convenient access to the following features:

• Oracle SQL Developer: a graphical tool that enables you to browse, create, edit, and delete database objects; run SQL statements and scripts; edit and debug PL/SQL code; manipulate and export data; migrate third-party databases to Oracle; view metadata and data in third-party databases; and view and create reports. • Oracle Application Express: a robust rapid application development system. • RESTful web Services - the ability to use RESTful web services to access data in

your Oracle Database. (Both Application Express and SQL Developer include a RESTful web service wizard, which makes it easy for you to create services which implement any SQL statement or PL/SQL procedure to supply data to

applications.)

For further information about Oracle Database Cloud – Database Schema Service, including how to use its most attractive features, see Using Oracle Database Cloud

-Database Schema Service.

About Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service

Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service provides you the ability to create service instances that contain Oracle databases, with each service instance containing a single Oracle database. You have full access to the features and operations available with Oracle Database, but with Oracle providing the computing power, physical storage and (optionally) tooling to simplify routine database maintenance and management operations.

When you create service instances, Database as a Service creates compute nodes to host the database, using computing and storage resources provided by Oracle Compute Cloud Service. Additionally, it provides access to the compute nodes (and thus to the database) using networking resources provided by Oracle Compute Cloud Service.

Because each service instance provides a complete Oracle database and provides you direct access to it, you can avoid many of the restrictions associated with Database Schema Service. For example, you can define multiple schemas in the database, and you can connect to the database using Oracle Net Services.

Two service levels of Database as a Service instances are available:

• The Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image level includes Oracle Database and supporting software on the service instance. You have to install this software yourself, and you are responsible for all maintenance operations for this software. You have root privilege, so you can load and run software in the compute

environment. You have full administrative privileges for the Oracle database. • The Oracle Database Cloud Service level also includes Oracle Database and

supporting software on the service instance. However, the software is installed for

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you, an Oracle database is created using values you provide when creating the service instance, and the database is started. Additionally, you can direct Database as a Service to set up automatic backups when creating the service instance. Finally, the service instance includes cloud tooling that simplifies backup, recovery,

patching and upgrade operations. You have root privilege, so you can load and run software in the compute environment. You have full administrative privileges for the Oracle database. You are responsible for making any changes to the automated maintenance setup, and you are responsible for recovery operations in the event of a failure.

About Database as a Service Instances

When you create an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you use the Create Database Cloud Service Instance wizard, which steps you through the process of making the choices that produce a service instance tailored to your needs. These choices include:

• Service Level

• Billing Frequency

• Oracle Database Release Version

• Oracle Database Edition

• Computing Power

• Database Storage

• Automatic Backup Configuration

Service Level

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose one of the following service levels:

• Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image—a compute environment with pre-installed virtual machine images that include all software needed to create and run an Oracle Database. You connect to the virtual machine and run the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to create your database. All subsequent maintenance operations, including backup, patching and upgrades, are performed by you.

• Oracle Database Cloud Service—everything in Virtual Image, plus a database created according to specifications you provide in the Create Database Cloud Service Instance wizard, plus cloud tooling that provides automatic and on-demand backups, patching and upgrading, and point-in-time recovery for your Oracle Databases.

Cloud Tooling for Database as a Service

In addition to the capabilities of the web-based Oracle Database Cloud Service console, Database as a Service offers the following tools on the compute nodes of service instances created using the Oracle Database Cloud Service service level: • Simple Automated Backups: use the bkup_api utility (raccli on service

instances that use Oracle Real Application Clusters) to perform on-demand

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backups and to change how automatic backups are configured. See Backing Up and Restoring a Database as a Service Instance.

• Simple Automated Recovery: use the orec subcommand of the dbaascli utility

(raccli on service instances that use Oracle Real Application Clusters) to restore

from backups. See Backing Up and Restoring a Database as a Service Instance. • Simple Automated Patching: use the dbpatchm subcommand of the dbaascli

utility (raccli on service instances that use Oracle Real Application Clusters) to

apply patches. See Patching Database as a Service.

• New DBaaS Monitor: use the Oracle DBaaS Monitor web application to monitor the Oracle database and the Oracle GlassFish Server domain on the service instance. See Accessing Oracle DBaaS Monitor. Oracle DBaaS Monitor is not available on service instances that use Oracle Real Application Clusters.

Billing Frequency

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose one of the following billing frequencies:

• Hourly—Pay only for the number of hours used during your billing period. You cannot switch a service instance from hourly to monthly billing frequency after it is created.

• Monthly—Pay one price for the full month irrespective of the number of hours used.

For service instances that are started in the middle of a month, the price is pro-rated; you pay only for the partial month from the day the instance is created. You cannot switch a service instance from monthly to hourly billing frequency after it is created.

Oracle Database Release Version

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose one of the following Oracle Database software release versions:

• Oracle Database 11g Release 2 • Oracle Database 12c Release 1

Oracle Database Edition

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose one of the following Oracle Database editions:

• Standard Edition—delivers unprecedented ease of use, power, and performance for workgroup, department-level, and Web applications. Oracle Database Standard Edition includes all the facilities necessary to build business-critical applications. This edition is only available for Oracle Database 11g Release 2.

• Enterprise Edition—provides the performance, availability, scalability, and security required for mission-critical applications such as high-volume online transaction processing (OLTP) applications, query-intensive data warehouses, and demanding Internet applications.

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Enterprise Edition contains all the components of Oracle Database.

• Enterprise Edition - High Performance—provides all the features of Enterprise Edition, plus all the database enterprise management packs and all the Enterprise Edition options except:

– Active Data Guard – In-Memory Database – Oracle RAC One Node

– Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC)

• Enterprise Edition - Extreme Performance—provides all the features of Enterprise Edition, plus all the database enterprise management packs and all the Enterprise Edition options except:

– Oracle RAC One Node

Note:

Regardless of which Enterprise Edition variation you choose, all available database enterprise management packs and Enterprise Edition options are included in the Database as a Service instance that is created. The packs and options that are not part of the Enterprise Edition variation you chose are available to you for use on a trial basis.

Computing Power

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose the computing power for the service instance's compute node (or compute nodes in the case of service instances that use Oracle Real Application Clusters) from a list of supported OCPU (Oracle CPU) and processor RAM combinations. These

combinations fall into two categories: • General Purpose:

– OC3 - 1 OCPU, 7.5 GB RAM – OC4 - 2 OCPU, 15 GB RAM – OC5 - 4 OCPU, 30 GB RAM – OC6 - 8 OCPU, 60 GB RAM – OC7 - 16 OCPU, 120 GB RAM • High Memory:

– OC1M - 1 OCPU, 15 GB RAM – OC2M - 2 OCPU, 30 GB RAM – OC3M - 4 OCPU, 60 GB RAM – OC4M - 8 OCPU, 120 GB RAM

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– OC5M - 16 OCPU, 240 GB RAM

Database Storage

When creating an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose the amount of usable data storage you want for your database in gigabyte (GB) increments up to a maximum of 1 TB.

After you create the service instance, you can add more data storage as needed. For information, see Scaling Up the Storage of a Service Instance.

Automatic Backup Configuration

When creating a new Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you choose whether you want automatic backups to be configured for the instance. Your choices are:

• Back up to cloud storage and VM block storage—30 days' worth of backups are kept, with the 7 most recent days' worth available directly on VM block storage. If you choose this option, you must specify an existing Oracle Storage Cloud container for the cloud storage. This container becomes associated with Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service, which Database as a Service uses to perform backups to cloud storage. Once associated with Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service, this container becomes part of your Oracle Database Public Cloud Services subscription (or trial) rather than part of an Oracle IaaS Public Cloud Services subscription (or trial).

Note:

Do not use the Oracle Storage Cloud container that you are using to back up Database as a Service instances to cloud storage for any other purpose. For example, do not also use it to back up Oracle Java Cloud Service instances to cloud storage. Using the container for multiple purposes can result in billing errors.

• Back up to VM block storage only—7 days' worth of backups are kept on VM block storage.

• No backups—automatic backups are not configured.

Before You Begin with Database as a Service

Before you begin using Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service, you should be familiar with the following technologies:

• Oracle Cloud

See Getting Started with Oracle Cloud for information about Oracle Cloud, especially the topic Buying a Metered Subscription to an Oracle Cloud Service.

• Oracle Compute Cloud Service

Database as a Service compute nodes use a variety of Oracle Compute Cloud Service resources. See Using Oracle Compute Cloud Service for information about its instances and the disk images, compute shapes, storage volumes, IP reservations, security lists, security rules, and secure shell (SSH) public keys that underlie them.

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• Oracle Storage Cloud Service containers

Database as a Service uses Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service to back up to cloud storage. Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service, in turn, uses Oracle Storage Cloud Service containers as repositories for backups to the cloud. Before you can create a container, you must have an active subscription to Oracle Storage Cloud Service. For more information, see How to Begin with Oracle Storage Cloud Service Subscriptions in Using Oracle Storage Cloud Service.

Before you create your first Database as a Service instance:

• Procure a Database as a Service subscription. Without an active subscription, you cannot create a Database as a Service instance.

• Create a Secure Shell (SSH) public/private key pair so you can provide the public key when you create the instance. See Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/ Private Key Pair.

• (Optional) Create a container in Oracle Storage Cloud Service to store backups on cloud storage. See Creating Containers in Using Oracle Storage Cloud Service.

Note:

Do not use an Oracle Storage Cloud container that you use to back up Database as a Service instances for any other purpose. For example, do not also use it to back up Oracle Java Cloud Service instances. Using the container for multiple purposes can result in billing errors.

How to Begin with Database as a Service Subscriptions

Here’s how to get started with Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service trials and paid subscriptions:

1. Request a trial environment or purchase a subscription to Oracle Database Public

Cloud Services. See Subscribing to an Oracle Cloud Service Trial or Buying a Metered Subscription to an Oracle Cloud Service in Getting Started with Oracle

Cloud.

2. Set up your Oracle Database Public Cloud Services account. See Setting Up a

Metered Oracle Cloud Services Account in Getting Started with Oracle Cloud.

3. Verify Database as a Service is ready to use. See Verifying That Metered Oracle

Cloud Services Are Running in Getting Started with Oracle Cloud.

4. Learn about Database as a Service users and roles. See About Database as a Service Roles and Users.

5. Create accounts for your users and assign them appropriate privileges and roles.

See Managing User Accounts and Managing User Roles in Managing and Monitoring

Oracle Cloud.

6. Be sure to review the prerequisites described in Before You Begin with Database as a Service before you create your first Database as a Service instance.

Note that an Oracle Database Public Cloud Services trial environment or purchased subscription comes with Oracle IaaS Public Cloud Services, which provides you access to:

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• Oracle Compute Cloud Service, which Database as a Service relies on • Oracle Storage Cloud Service, which Database Backup Service and, in turn,

Database as a Service rely on

Despite the fact that these services are part of the Oracle IaaS Public Cloud Services subscription, use of their features by Database as a Service or Database Backup Service are billed to the Oracle Database Public Cloud Services subscription.

About Database as a Service Roles and Users

In addition to the roles and privileges described in Oracle Cloud User Roles and Privileges in Getting Started with Oracle Cloud, the following role is created for Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service: DBaaS Database Administrator.

When the Database as a Service account is first set up, the service administrator is given this role. User accounts with this role must be added before anyone else can access and use Database as a Service.

The identity domain administrator can create more Database as a Service administrators by creating user accounts and assigning the role to user. For information about how to add user accounts in Oracle Cloud, see Managing User Accounts and Managing and Monitoring Oracle Cloud.

The following table summarizes the privileges given to the DBaaS Database Administrator role:

Description of Privilege More Information

Can create and delete service instances Creating a Database as a Service Instance Deleting a Database as a Service Instance

Can scale, patch, and back up or restore

service instances Scaling a Database as a Service InstancePatching Database as a Service

Backing Up and Restoring a Database as a Service Instance

Can monitor and manage service usage in

Oracle Cloud Managing and Monitoring Oracle CloudServices in Managing and Monitoring Oracle

Cloud

Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console

To access the Oracle Database Cloud Service console:

1. Display the Sign In to Oracle Cloud page by clicking the My Services URL link in

your Welcome email or by following these instructions:

a. Open your web browser and go to the Oracle Cloud website: http:// cloud.oracle.com.

b. Click Sign In.

c. In the My Services box, select the data center where your services are located: Public Cloud Services - NA or Public Cloud Services - EMEA.

d. Click Sign In to My Services. About Database as a Service Roles and Users

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2. On the Sign In to Oracle Cloud page, enter your user name, your password and the

name of your identity domain. Then, click Sign In. The My Services Dashboard opens.

3. In the list of services, locate the entry for Oracle Database Cloud Service and then

click Service Console.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service opens.

4. If a Welcome page is displayed, view the list of service instances by clicking Services next to “Database Cloud Service”.

For information about the details provided on the Oracle Database Cloud Service console, see Oracle Database Cloud Service Services Page.

Typical Workflow for Using Database as a Service

To start using Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service, refer to the following tasks as a guide:

Task Description More Information

Get a trial environment or purchase a subscription to Oracle Database Public Cloud Services

Provide your information, and sign up for a free trial or purchase a

subscription to Oracle Database Public Cloud Services.

How to Begin with Database as a Service Subscriptions

Add and manage users

and roles Create accounts for your users andassign them appropriate privileges. Assign the necessary Database as a Service roles.

Managing User Accounts and Managing User Roles in Managing and Monitoring

Oracle Cloud, and About Database as a Service Roles and Users

Create an SSH key pair Create an SSH public/private key pair for use when creating service instances.

Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/ Private Key Pair

Create a service instance Use a wizard to create a new service instance.

Creating a Database as a Service Instance

Enable network access to

the service instance Permit access to network servicesassociated with the service instance. About Network Access to a Database as aService Instance

Load data into the service

instance Use standard Oracle Database tools toload data into the service instance's database.

Loading Data into the Oracle Database in a Database as a Service Instance

Monitor service instances Check on the health and performance

of individual service instances. Monitoring and Managing the Database ina Database as a Service Instance

Monitor the service Check on the day-to-day operation of your service, monitor performance, and review important notifications.

Managing and Monitoring Oracle Cloud Services in Managing and Monitoring Oracle

Cloud

Patch a service instance Apply a patch or roll back a patch. Patching Database as a Service

Back up a service instance Back up a service instance or restore a

service instance from a backup. Backing Up and Restoring a Database as aService Instance

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Managing the Life Cycle of Database as a

Service Instances

This section describes tasks to manage the life cycle of Oracle Database Cloud -Database as a Service instances.

Topics

• Creating a Database as a Service Instance

• Viewing All Database as a Service Instances

• Viewing Detailed Information for a Database as a Service Instance

• Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Database as a Service Instance

• Restarting a Database as a Service Compute Node

• Deleting a Database as a Service Instance

• Tracking the Number of Database as a Service Instances in an Account

Creating a Database as a Service Instance

To create an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, use the Create Database Cloud Service Instance wizard as described in the following procedure.

Before You Begin

Before you create a Database as a Service instance, ensure you have created the following:

• An SSH public/private key pair

When creating a Database as a Service instance, you must associate an SSH public key with the service instance. You can upload a new public key during the service creation process, or you can specify the name of a public key that has been uploaded previously. A public key might have been uploaded previously during creation of another service instance or manually using the Oracle Compute Cloud Service console.

An SSH public key is used for authentication when you use an SSH client to connect to a compute node associated with the service instance. When you connect, you must provide the private key that matches the public key.

You generate an SSH public/private key pair using a standard SSH key generation tool. For more information, see Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/Private Key Pair.

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To back up your new instance to the cloud, you first must create an Oracle Storage Cloud Service container. For information about creating a container, see Creating Containers in Using Oracle Storage Cloud Service.

This container becomes associated with Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service, which Database as a Service uses to perform backups to cloud storage. Once associated with Oracle Database Backup Cloud Service, this container becomes part of your Oracle Database Public Cloud Services subscription (or trial) rather than part of an Oracle IaaS Public Cloud Services subscription (or trial).

Note:

Do not use the Oracle Storage Cloud container that you are using to back up Database as a Service instances for any other purpose. For example, do not also use it to back up Oracle Java Cloud Service instances. Using the container for multiple purposes can result in billing errors.

When creating a Database as a Service instance, you are prompted for the following information about the container:

– The name of the container

– The user name and password of a user who has read/write access to the container

Procedure

To create a Database as a Service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. Click Create Service.

The Create Database Cloud Service Instance wizard starts and the Subscription Type page is displayed.

3. On the Subscription Type page, select the service level and billing frequency that

you want to define. Then, click Next. Your choices for service level are:

• Oracle Database Cloud Service—everything in Virtual Image, plus a database created according to specifications you provide in the wizard, plus cloud tooling that provides automatic and on-demand backups, patching and upgrading, and point-in-time recovery for your Oracle Databases.

• Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image—a compute environment with pre-installed virtual machine images that include all software needed to create and run an Oracle Database. You connect to the virtual machine and run the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to create your database. All subsequent maintenance operations, including backup, patching and upgrades, are performed by you.

Your choices for billing frequency are:

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• Hourly—Pay only for the number of hours used during your billing period. You cannot switch a service instance from hourly to monthly billing frequency after it is created.

• Monthly—Pay one price for the full month irrespective of the number of hours used.

For service instances that are started in the middle of a month, the price is pro-rated; you pay only for the partial month from the day the instance is created. You cannot switch a service instance from monthly to hourly billing frequency after it is created.

4. On the Software Release page, select the Oracle Database software release that

you want to run on your instance. Then, click Next. Your choices for software release are:

• Oracle Database 11g Release 2 • Oracle Database 12c Release 1

5. On the Software Edition page, select the Oracle Database software edition that

you want to run on your instance. Then, click Next. Your choices for software edition are:

• Standard Edition—delivers unprecedented ease of use, power, and

performance for workgroup, department-level, and Web applications. Oracle Database Standard Edition includes all the facilities necessary to build business-critical applications.

This edition is only available for Oracle Database 11g Release 2.

• Enterprise Edition—provides the performance, availability, scalability, and security required for mission-critical applications such as high-volume online transaction processing (OLTP) applications, query-intensive data warehouses, and demanding Internet applications.

Enterprise Edition contains all the components of Oracle Database. • Enterprise Edition - High Performance—provides all the features of

Enterprise Edition, plus all the database enterprise management packs and all the Enterprise Edition options except:

– Active Data Guard – In-Memory Database – Oracle RAC One Node

– Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC)

• Enterprise Edition - Extreme Performance—provides all the features of Enterprise Edition, plus all the database enterprise management packs and all the Enterprise Edition options except:

– Oracle RAC One Node

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Note:

If you choose one of the Enterprise Edition variations, all available database enterprise management packs and Enterprise Edition options are included in the service instance that is created. The packs and options that are not part of the Enterprise Edition variation you chose are available to you for use on a trial basis.

6. On the Service Details page, configure details for your service instance. Then, click Next.

Note:

An asterisk adjacent to a field name indicates that the field is required.

a. In the Instance Configuration section, select the name, description, and

compute shape of your service instance and provide an SSH public key to access the instance.

• Instance Name—enter a name for your service instance. This name: – Must not exceed 50 characters (15 characters for a service instance that

uses Oracle RAC). – Must start with a letter.

– Must contain only letters, numbers, or hyphens. – Must not contain any other special characters. – Must be unique within the identity domain.

• Description—enter a description for your service instance. (Optional) • Compute Shape—select a compute shape from the list of supported

OCPU (Oracle CPU) and RAM combinations. These combinations fall into two categories:

– General Purpose:

◆ OC3 - 1 OCPU, 7.5 GB RAM ◆ OC4 - 2 OCPU, 15 GB RAM ◆ OC5 - 4 OCPU, 30 GB RAM ◆ OC6 - 8 OCPU, 60 GB RAM ◆ OC7 - 16 OCPU, 120 GB RAM – High Memory:

◆ OC1M - 1 OCPU, 15 GB RAM ◆ OC2M - 2 OCPU, 30 GB RAM ◆ OC3M - 4 OCPU, 60 GB RAM

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◆ OC4M - 8 OCPU, 120 GB RAM ◆ OC5M - 16 OCPU, 240 GB RAM

• VM Public Key—provide the SSH public key to be used for authentication when using an SSH client to connect to a compute node VM that is

associated with your service instance.

Click Edit to specify the public key, either by uploading a key file or by entering the name of a key that was uploaded earlier.

To specify the name of a key that was uploaded earlier, use the full hierarchical name of the key:

/domain/user/keyname

To discover the full hierarchical name of a key, view the list of keys on the Oracle Compute Cloud Service SSH Public Keys page and hover over the short name of the key. For more information, see Viewing an SSH Public Key in Using Oracle Compute Cloud Service.

b. In the Database Configuration section, select the amount of data storage,

administrator password, database name (SID), PDB name (for Oracle Database 12c), inclusion of “Demos” PDB (for Oracle Database 12c), and whether to set up Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) (for Oracle Database 12c) for the Oracle Database to be created in your service instance.

Note:

The Database Configuration section does not appear if you chose the “Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image” service level.

• Usable Database Storage (GB)—enter the amount of storage you want for actual database data (in GB).

• Total Data File Storage (GB)—the computed amount of storage in GB that will be allocated to your instance, including space for operating system and product binaries, supporting files, database data and configuration files, and so on.

• Administration Password and Confirm Password—enter and then reenter a password for administrative access to the database and to other components of your service instance, specifically:

– Oracle Database SYS and SYSTEM users – Oracle Application Express ADMIN user – Oracle GlassFish Server admin user – Cloud database monitor access The password you enter:

– Must be 8 to 30 characters in length. – Must contain at least one lowercase letter – Must contain at least one uppercase letter

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– Must contain at least one number

– Must contain at least one of these symbols: _ (underscore), # (hash sign), or $ (dollar sign).

• DB Name (SID)—enter a name for the database instance. This name: – Must not exceed 8 characters.

– Must start with a letter.

– Must contain only letters, numbers, or these symbols: _ (underscore), # (hash sign), or $ (dollar sign).

• PDB Name (Available only for Oracle Database 12c)—enter a name for the default PDB (pluggable database). This name:

– Must not exceed 8 characters. – Must start with a letter.

– Must contain only letters, numbers, or these symbols: _ (underscore), # (hash sign), or $ (dollar sign).

• Include “Demos” PDB—include the "Demos" PDB in the database, which contains demos for many new features of 12c such as in-memory and multitenant. Usable Data File Storage must to be at least 25 GB to include this PDB. This option is available only for Oracle Database 12c.

• RAC Database—controls whether a two-node Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) database is created. This option is available only if you choose a shape with two OCPUs for trial accounts or a shape with four or more OCPUs for subscription accounts.

c. In the Backup and Recovery Configuration section, choose a backup option

for the database in your service and, depending on your choice, provide information about the Oracle Storage Cloud Service container where cloud backups are to be stored.

Note:

The Backup and Recovery Configuration section does not appear if you chose the “Oracle Database Cloud Service - Virtual Image” service level.

Backup Destination—select how backups are to be configured:

• Both Cloud Storage and Block Storage—backups are configured to be created automatically and stored both on block storage and on an Oracle Storage Cloud Service container.

If this choice is selected, the Cloud Storage Container, User Name and Password fields are displayed:

– Cloud Storage Container—enter the name of an existing Oracle Storage Cloud Service container in the format:

instance-id_domain/container Creating a Database as a Service Instance

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where instance is the name of the Oracle Storage Cloud Service

instance, id_domain is the name of the identity domain, and container is the name of the container.

Note:

Do not use the Oracle Storage Cloud Service container that you are using to back up Database as a Service instances to cloud storage for any other

purpose. For example, do not also use it to back up Oracle Java Cloud Service instances to cloud storage. Using the container for multiple purposes can result in billing errors.

– Cloud Storage User Name—enter the user name of a user who has read/write access to the container specified in Cloud Storage

Container.

– Cloud Storage Password—enter the password of the user specified in

Cloud Storage User Name.

• Block Store Only—backups are configured to be created automatically and stored on block storage.

• None—backups are not configured for your service instance.

7. On the Confirmation page, review the information listed. If you are satisfied with

the information, click Create.

If you need to change the information, use the navigation bar or Back button at the top of the wizard to step back through the pages in the wizard. Click Cancel to cancel out of the wizard without creating a new instance.

Viewing All Database as a Service Instances

From the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console, you can:

• View the total resources allocated across all Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instances.

• View the details for each service instance.

• Use the search field to filter the list to include only the service instances that contain a given string in their name.

To view all Database as a Service instances:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console. The Oracle Database Cloud Service console is displayed, showing a list of all service instances.

For information about the details provided on the Oracle Database Cloud Service console, see Oracle Database Cloud Service Console Page.

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Viewing Detailed Information for a Database as a Service Instance

From the Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page, you can:

• View a summary of details for the Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, such as description, subscription mode, and so on.

• View the total resources allocated for the Database as a Service instance. • View the details and status information for each node.

To view detailed information for a Database as a Service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. Click on the service instance for which you want to view more information.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance page is displayed with the Overview tile foremost.

For more information about the details provided on the Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page, see Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview Page.

Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Database as a Service Instance

You can stop, start and restart an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance from the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

Topics

• About Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Service Instance

• Stopping a Service Instance

• Starting a Stopped Service Instance

• Restarting a Service Instance

• Viewing Past Stop, Start and Restart Activity

About Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Service Instance About Stopping a Service Instance

When you stop a Database as a Service instance, no access to it is possible and you can perform no management operations on it except to start it or to delete it.

Stopping a service instance is similar to turning off your personal computer: it has no computing capabilities because the CPU and RAM have no power, but all its other resources—disk drives and the data they contain, static IP reservations, and so on— remain and are ready to be put back into use when power is restored.

When a Database as a Service instance is stopped, its CPU and RAM (an Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance) are stopped. As a consequence, it consumes no OCPU or memory resources and so metering and billing of these resources stop. However, all the other resources of the service instance continue to exist and so continue to be metered and billed, including:

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• Oracle Compute Cloud Service resources such as storage volumes and IP address reservations

• Oracle Storage Cloud Service storage space used by the service instance’s backups to the Oracle Cloud (if the service instance was being backed up to cloud storage) Additionally, when a Database as a Service instance is stopped, backups of the service instance are not performed.

About Starting a Stopped Service Instance

When you start a stopped Database as a Service instance, access to it becomes possible again and you can perform management operations on it such as scaling and patching. Starting a stopped service instance is similar to turning your personal computer back on: its computing capabilities are restored because the CPU and RAM again have power, and all its other resources are put back into use.

When a Database as a Service instance is started:

1. An Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance of the appropriate compute shape

(OCPU and memory) is allocated to it.

2. All other Compute Cloud Service resources associated with it at instance creation

or as the result of a scaling operation are reattached to it.

3. The allocated Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance is started.

After these steps complete, the Database as a Service instance is running and available. Because the started service instance again consumes OCPU and memory resources, metering and billing of these resources resume.

Note:

Only those Compute Cloud Service resources that became associated with the Database as a Service instance when the instance was initially created or as the result of a scaling operation are reattached when the Database as a Service instance is started. As a result, you must manually reattach the following kinds of Compute Cloud Service resources:

• Storage volumes you created and attached using the Oracle Compute Cloud Service console.

You must attach such storage volumes to the new Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance (the compute node) once the Database as a Service

instance is started, and then connect to the compute node and mount them. • Security lists to which you added the Database as a Service instance’s

previous Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance (the compute node). You must add such security lists to the new Oracle Compute Cloud Service instance once the Database as a Service instance is started.

About Restarting a Service Instance

When you restart a Database as a Service instance, the service instance is stopped and then immediately started again. Thus, the information about what happens when stopping and starting a service instance applies to restarting a service instance as well, just in immediate succession.

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Note:

Restarting a service instance is different from rebooting a compute node of a service instance. Rebooting a compute node, as described in Restarting a Database as a Service Compute Node, does not restart the service instance. It simply reboots the compute node.

Stopping a Service Instance

In general, you stop a Database as a Service instance for one of these reasons: • To prohibit access to it.

• To reduce its cost of operation, especially if its billing frequency is hourly.

Before You Begin

To learn what happens when you stop a Database as a Service instance, review About Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Service Instance.

Procedure

To stop a service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. In the list of instances, click the name of the service instance you want to stop.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page is displayed.

3. From the menu, select Stop, and then confirm the action.

The instance first has a status of Maintenance and then Stopped in the Oracle Database Cloud Service console. Note that you cannot scale a stopped instance.

Starting a Stopped Service Instance Before You Begin

To learn what happens when you start a stoppedDatabase as a Service instance, review About Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Service Instance.

Procedure

To start a stopped service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. In the list of instances, click the name of the stopped service instance you want to

start.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page is displayed.

3. From the menu, select Start, and then confirm the action. Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Database as a Service Instance

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The instance has a status of Maintenance in the Oracle Database Cloud Service console until it is fully started.

Restarting a Service Instance

Note:

Restarting a service instance is different from rebooting a compute node of a service instance. Rebooting a compute node, as described in Restarting a Database as a Service Compute Node, does not restart the service instance. It simply reboots the compute node.

Before You Begin

To learn what happens when you restart a Database as a Service instance, review

About Stopping, Starting and Restarting a Service Instance.

Procedure

To restart a service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. In the list of instances, click the name of the service instance you want to restart.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page is displayed.

3. From the menu, select Restart, and then confirm the action.

The instance has a status of Maintenance in the Oracle Database Cloud Service console until it is fully restarted.

Viewing Past Stop, Start and Restart Activity

You can see information about past stop, start and restart activity by viewing a service instance’s activity log:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Oracle Database Cloud Service.

2. In the list of instances, click the name of the service instance whose past activity

you want to view.

The Oracle Database Cloud Service Instance Overview page is displayed.

3. Click the triangle icon to the left of the Activity title to expand the service

instance’s activity log.

The activity log shows information about past operations performed on the service instance, with the most recent activity first.

4. Click the icon next to a particular operation to see details about that operation.

If an operation failed, the details include information about why it failed.

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Restarting a Database as a Service Compute Node

On occasion, you might find it necessary to restart a compute node associated with an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance. Follow these steps to perform the operation.

1. Connect to the compute node as the opc user.

Unlike the oracle user, the opc user has the privileges required to perform

operations that require root-user access.

For detailed instructions, see Connecting to a Compute Node Through Secure Shell (SSH).

2. Start a root-user command shell: $ sudo -s

#

3. Enter the command to reboot the compute node: # reboot

Caution:

Do not use the halt, shutdown or shutdown —h commands to shut down

the compute node. Doing so will stop the compute node indefinitely and will require manual intervention by Oracle Cloud system administrators to restart the compute node.

Your connection to the compute node is closed and the compute node reboots.

Deleting a Database as a Service Instance

When you no longer require an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance, you can delete it.

To delete a Database as a Service instance:

1. Open the Oracle Database Cloud Service console.

For detailed instructions, see Accessing the Oracle Database Cloud Service Console.

2. From the menu for the instance, select Delete.

You are prompted to confirm the deletion. Once deleted, the Database as a Service instance is removed from the list of instances displayed on the Database as a Service Console.

Tracking the Number of Database as a Service Instances in an Account

You can track the number of Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instances across all identity domains using the My Account Dashboard page. Note that the My Account Dashboard page is different from the My Services Dashboard page: My Account Dashboard shows information for your entire account, while My Services Dashboard shows information limited to one identity domain in your account.

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To open the My Account Dashboard page, sign in to My Account. By default, the Dashboard page is in focus. You can also click Dashboard at any time to display the page.

The list of services is displayed using the following naming convention: service-name (service-type). Click the service name to go to the details page, which

displays status history, availability history, usage metrics, and additional information for the selected service.

For information about the details provided on the Dashboard page, see Exploring the My Account Dashboard Page in Getting Started with Oracle Cloud.

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Managing Network Access to a Database as

a Service Instance

By default, network access to an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance is provided by using SSH. The SSH connection uses the SSH key specified during service instance creation. By default, port 22 is used for SSH connections. To access other ports you must perform additional configuration tasks, such as creating an SSH tunnel or enabling access to the port.

Topics

• About Network Access to a Database as a Service Instance

• Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/Private Key Pair

• Creating an SSH Tunnel to a Compute Node Port

• Enabling Access to a Compute Node Port

• Defining a Custom Host Name or Domain Name for Database as a Service

• Using Network Encryption and Integrity

About Network Access to a Database as a Service Instance

When an Oracle Database Cloud - Database as a Service instance is created, network access to the compute nodes of the service instance is provided by Secure Shell (SSH) connections on port 22.

SSH Access on Port 22

SSH is a cryptographic network protocol that uses two keys, one public and one private, to provide secure communication between two networked computers. Port 22 is the standard TCP/IP port that is assigned to SSH servers.

When a service instance is being created, the public key is specified on the Details page of the Create Database Cloud Service Instance wizard by:

• Uploading the public key file.

When the public key file is uploaded during the service instance creation process, the key is added to the Oracle Compute Cloud Service environment that supports Database as a Service and given a unique name.

• Entering the full hierarchical name of an existing public key using the format /

domain/user/keyname.

An existing public key is one that has already been added to the Oracle Compute Cloud Service environment that supports Database as a Service, either as the result of an earlier service instance creation process or by manual addition to Oracle

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Compute Cloud Service. To discover the full hierarchical name of a key, view the list of keys on the Oracle Compute Cloud Service SSH Public Keys page and hover over the short name of the key. For more information, see Viewing an SSH Public Key in Using Oracle Compute Cloud Service.

For information on manually adding a public key to Oracle Compute Cloud Service, see Adding an SSH Public Key in Using Oracle Compute Cloud Service. When you access any compute node of a Database as a Service instance using SSH, you must provide the private key that matches the public key specified when the service instance was created.

To generate the SSH public/private key pairs needed to create and access Database as a Service instances, see Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/Private Key Pair.

Access to Other Ports

To access network protocols and services on a compute node by using a port other than port 22, you must either:

• Enable network access to the port

You use the Oracle Compute Cloud Service console to enable access to a port on a compute node. For more information, see Enabling Access to a Compute Node Port

• Create an SSH tunnel to the port

Creating an SSH tunnel enables you to access a specific compute node port by using an SSH connection as the transport mechanism. To create the tunnel, you must have the SSH private key file that matches the public key specified when the service instance was created. For more information, see Creating an SSH Tunnel to a Compute Node Port.

Generating a Secure Shell (SSH) Public/Private Key Pair

Several tools exist to generate SSH public/private key pairs. The following sections show how to generate an SSH key pair on UNIX, UNIX-like and Windows platforms.

Generating an SSH Key Pair on UNIX and UNIX-Like Platforms Using the ssh-keygen

Utility

UNIX and UNIX-like platforms (including Solaris and Linux) include the ssh-keygen utility to generate SSH key pairs.

To generate an SSH key pair on UNIX and UNIX-like platforms using the ssh-keygen utility:

1. Navigate to your home directory: $ cd $HOME

2. Run the ssh-keygen utility, providing as filename your choice of file name for the

private key:

$ ssh-keygen -b 2048 -t rsa -f filename

The ssh-keygen utility prompts you for a passphrase for the private key.

3. Enter a passphrase for the private key, or press Enter to create a private key

without a passphrase:

Figure

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