Microsoft Excel 2010 Charts and Graphs. Class Workbook

50  Download (0)

Full text

(1)

Microsoft Excel 2010

Microsoft Excel 2010

Charts and Graphs

Charts and Graphs

Class Workbook

Class Workbook

 

A UCSD Biomedical Library Workshop

Information Commons Educational Services

2008 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2008 2009 2008 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2008 2009

(2)

Introduc on

 

Charts

 

and

 

graphs

 

are

 

a

 

great

 

way

 

of

 

represen ng

 

your

 

data

 

visually.

 

Microso

 

Excel

 

2010

 

o

ers

 

a

 

varie

ty

 

of

 

chart

 

types

 

and

 

makes

 

it

 

easy

 

to

 

draw

 

them

 

so

 

that

 

your

 

data

 

can

 

be

 

quickly

 

understood

 

in

 

a

 

graphical

 

format.

 

In

 

this

 

workshop

 

you

 

will

 

learn

 

about

 

each

 

chart

 

type,

 

what

 

the

 

chart

 

represents,

 

and

 

addi onal

 

func onality

 

you

 

might

 

not

 

have

 

heard

 

about.

  

The

 

goal

 

of

 

this

 

workshop

 

is

 

to

 

make

 

you

 

more

 

e

cient

 

and

 

e

ec ve

 

in

  

crea ng

 

visual

 

displays

 

of

 

infor

(3)
(4)

July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2008 2422 1717 2807 4801 6035 5418 2009 2698 4231 4687 9417 5953 4628 2 4 2 2 1 7 1 7 2 8 0 7 4 8 0 1 6 0 3 5 5 4 1 8 2 6 9 8 4 2 3 1 4 6 8 7 9 4 1 7 5 9 5 3 4 6 2 8 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000 In q u ir ie s Months

Chart Title

2008 2009

Iden fying

 

Chart

 

Elements

 

Ver cal Axis,  also called  the Y axis  Horizontal Axis  Also called   the X axis  Ver cal Axis Title  Horizontal Axis Title  Data Table  Data Label  Legend  Data Series  Chart Area  Plot Area  Grid Lines 

(5)

How to Create an Excel Chart

Charts make data visual. Instead of having to analyze columns of numbers, you can see at a plethora of informa on at glance. 

To

 

create

 

a

 

chart:

 

1. Select the table in which you have your data for the chart 2. Click the Insert Tab

3. Click the down arrow of the chart category you want to create (column, line, pie, bar or etc.) 4. Select the type of chart within the category

5. Select and drag the chart to where you want it situated

6. Fine tune it with options in the Chart Tools menu (Design, Layout, and Format)

  1  2  3  4  6  5 

(6)

Design

 

Tab

 

The Design tab provides tools that give you quick and easy choices for how your chart is laid out, how the elements are labeled, and some color  combina ons and 3‐D effects that can add impact to the overall presenta on.  Use this tab when you are not concerned about details. 

Change

 

Chart

 

Type

 

This command will change the type of chart that you have currently selected in your spreadsheet, to a different type that you select from a  drop‐down menu (See Page 3). The old chart disappears and the newly selected chart replaces it. 

Save

 

As

 

Template

  

Saves a chart with the .crtx extension so it can be used as a basis for future charts. 

Switch

 

columns

 

and

 

rows

 

If Excel has misinterpreted your data and mixed up your X and Y axis, you can rec fy the problem by pressing this bu on. This will auto‐ ma cally switch the Y axis data to the X axis and the X axis data to the Y axis, 

Select

 

Data

 

This command will start the Select Data Source dialog box which will allow you to edit the range of data included in the chart. 

Chart

 

Layout

 

Gallery

 

 

Depending on the chart type you have chosen, the Chart Layout Gallery  offers 4‐12 built‐in combina on of chart elements. When you choose a  new chart layout from the gallery, you get a predefined combina on of  tles, legend, gridlines, data labels, and etc. These layouts may not al‐ ways be what you need, but they will give you the basic elements, which  you can then modify. 

(7)

Chart

 

Styles

  The Design tab is also home to the Chart Styles gallery that offers 48 varia ons of color  and effects. The gallery has columns for each of the six accent colors, monochromes  and mixed colors.   

Moving

 

Charts

  If you want to move your chart to another worksheet, the dialog box associated with this func on will make it pos‐ sible. You can choose to have it transferred to a new sheet or to one of the exis ng sheets using the drop down  menu provided in the dialog box.   

Layout

 

Tab

 

The Layout tab contains a few popular choices for forma ng 15 chart elements. In 60% of cases, you can use op ons from the drop‐down  menus on the Layout tab to create a perfect chart. 

Current Selec on Command Group 

Select

 

Chart

 

Elements

 

This feature provides a drop‐down menu that lists all the elements in the selected chart, such that when you select one from the  list, the corresponding element in the chart will be selected 

Format

 

Selec on

 

Once the chart element has been selected, you can press this bu on, which will bring up the format dialog box which can be used  to format the element at a very high degree of detail. 

(8)

Reset

 

to

 

Match

 

Style

 

  If you don’t like the changes you’ve made to the chart element, you can press this bu on to get back to where you started.   

Insert Command Group 

Picture

 

Opens files for selec on and inser on of an image into whatever cell is selected 

Shapes

 

Allows for the selec on and drawing of a wide range of shapes 

Text

 

Box

 

Provides for the drawing of a text box anywhere in the chart   

Labels

 

Command

 

Group

 

Chart

 

Title

 

 By default, a chart with more than one series is created without any  tle.  

 When the  tle is added above the chart, Excel shrinks the plot area to make more room for the  tle.  

 The  tle is selected by default so you can immediately type the actual  tle, which will appear in the formula bar.    Press the Enter key to finalize your chart  tle. 

 You can also select the text in the box and type your  tle over it.  

 To edit the  tle text, select the text and use the text edi ng tools in the Font and Paragraph sec ons of the Home tab.    To edit the  tle box you can either use the Chart Tools Format ribbon on the tool bar, or right click the Title box and select 

“Format Chart Title” which provides an extensive range of op ons. 

 To help the reader interpret the chart, include the message in the  tle. Instead of using an Excel generated  tle such as “Sales,”  you can actually use a two– or three‐lined  tle such as “Sales have grown every quarter except for Q3, when a strike impacted  produc on.” 

(9)

Axis

 

Titles

 

The Axis Title bu on on the Layout tab displays four op ons when clicked:  No Title, Rotated Title, Horizontal Title, and Ver cal Title.  

 The Rotated Title faces the plot area of the chart,    the Horizontal  tle is parallel to the horizontal axis,    the Ver cal  tle reads from top to bo om. 

For the Horizontal Axis  tle the only op on is to turn it on or off. 

All the forma ng op ons available for the chart  tle also apply to the axis  tles. 

Legend

 

 The built in choices for the legend include having the legend outside the le , right, bo om, or top of the  plot area.    If you move the legend to the top or the bo om, Excel rearranges the legend in a horizontal format.   Floa ng a Legend in the Plot Area  To float the legend in the Plot Area:   From the Layout tab, select the Legend drop‐down  Overlay Legend at Right. This keeps the legend  in a ver cal arrangement and stretches the plot area out to the edge of the chart.   Carefully click inside the legend. When the mouse pointer is a four‐headed arrow, drag the mouse  and drop the legend in a free spot on the chart.   While the legend is s ll selected, click the Format tab. Select Shape Fill, White, to convert the trans‐ parent fill to a solid fill. The fill prevents gridlines from overwri ng your legend  tles. 

 Select Format  Shape Outline  Black to add a border around the legend.   

 

(10)

 Changing the Arrangement of a Legend  To change the arrangement of a legend: 

 Click the legend to ac vate the resizing handles  Drag the bo om –right corner of the legend up and out to produce a leg‐ end with the labels arranged in a horizontal format 

   

Data

 

Labels

 

 Data labels can make things clearer and help you communicate the significance of what is  being presented.    Adding Data Labels to a chart    You can insert data labels by    selec ng the series for which you want the labels,    selec ng the Data Labels bu on on the Layout tab, or  

 selec ng one of the following loca ons from the drop‐down list.    Outside End, Center,  Inside End,  Inside Base, and None.    The three “inside” choices are useful when you have a stacked column chart.   Nudging a Label   If you want to adjust the posi on of your data labels to either separate them from each other or get them closer to the series  to which they relate, you can do so by    clicking once on the one you want to move (this se‐ lects all the labels in the series)   then click again (which selects only the one you are  selec ng), holding down the mouse key, and nudge  the label with the mouse to the desired loca on   Forma ng Labels 

 The Forma ng Labels dialog box contains a wide range of forma ng op ons that can enhance labels and make  them stand out. However, it does not contain font commands 

 To change the font, font color, font size and alignment, you will need to use the font sec on of the Home tab, or  right click and select Data Labels.  

(11)

 

Data

 

Table

 

Data

 

Table

  

 A Data Table is a mini worksheet that appears below a chart.   An advantage of a data table is that you can see the values of each data point without having to insert labels.    There are two built‐in op ons in the Data Table drop‐down on the Layout tab: You can show the data table with or without  legend keys   Choosing to show the legend keys can save space because it obviates the need for a legend. 

 If you select the More Data Table op ons in the Data Table drop‐down, you will see the usual op ons for fill, border styles,  shadow, and 3‐D, plus special data op ons 

(12)

 

Axes

 

Command

 

Group

 

 The Horizontal Axis   The Horizontal Axis, also called the Category or X‐Axis, appears along the bo om of the chart in column, line, area, and  stock charts   Your most important choice for this axis is whether it should be  me based or text based.    In a text based axis, the points along the axis are equally spaced. 

 In a chart that uses a  me‐based axis, the points are spaced on the rela ve  me distance between points.                         The Ver cal Axis   Contains the scale for the numbers plo ed in the chart. 

 The primary ver cal axis appears along the le  side of the chart in column, line, area, and stock charts. 

 Choices for this axis include scaling of the axis, the minimum and maximum value for the axis,  and the distance between  ck marks on  the axis.   0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

2009 2008

Ver cal

 

(Y)

 

Axis

 

(13)

 More choices are available in the Format Axis Dialog.   If your data has numbers of different scales you should specify a logarithmic axis   Say that you have a series of data with both  large and small data values such as Bookstore  sales by products. The Bookstore has high  flying products that account for 80% of its  revenue and then some older product lines  that are s ll hanging around. When you try to  plot these items on a chart, Excel must make  the axis scale large enough to show the sales  for the best‐selling products. This causes the  detail for the smaller product lines to become  lost because the values are a rela vely small  percentage of the en re scale.   When this occurs the solu on is to convert  the axis to a logarithmic axis. In a logarithmic  axis, the distance form 1 to 10 is the same as  the distance from one to 100, and so on. This allows you to see detail of the product selling a few hundreds units as well as the  products selling 100,000 units.   To convert to a logarithmic scale, select Layout, Axes, Primary Ver cal Axis, Show Axis with Log Scale. The result is a chart which  shows detailed data for both small and large amounts.   Overriding Scale Op ons 

 When you create a chart, Excel automa cally decides whether the ver cal  axis should reach to zero 

 To over‐ride the Maximum/Minimum se ngs for the ver cal axis, and thus create the illusion of greater variances in series da‐ ta: 

 Double‐click on the axis   Go to Axis Op ons  Override the minimum value on the axis by selec ng the Fixed op‐ on bu on for Minimum Type a value for the minimum 

(14)

Gridlines

 

 Gridlines help the reader locate data on the chart 

 Without gridlines, it is difficult to follow the plo ed points over the ver cal axis to figure out the value of a point.   Gridlines work in conjunc on with the Major Unit and Minor Unit se ngs in the Format Axis dialog box. 

 Built in op ons on the Layout tab for both horizontal and ver cal lines allow you to turn on major or minor, major and minor, or  no gridlines 

 Crea ng unobtrusive Gridlines by using format Gridlines 

 Each Format Gridlines dialog box has three categories in the le  naviga on bar, which can be used to dim the impact of  gridlines 

 Line Color: Use pale, light colors  

 Line Style: Use do ed or dashed lines at .25 points  Shadow: Use dim colored, blurred shadow 

(15)

Background

 

Command

 

Group

 

Plot

 

Area

 

 Using a Gradient 

To apply a gradient to the plot area, do the following steps: 

 Select Plot Area More Plot Area Op ons from the Background sec on of the  Layout Tab  

 Change the Fill se ng from Automa c to Gradient Fill   Choose Linear Gradient   Change the angle to 90 degrees   Each chevron shape on the Gradient Stops bar indicates a gradient  stop.    If there are more than 2 stops, select the last stop and click the mi‐ nus bu on to remove that stop.    Con nue to remove any stop higher than Stop 2   Click the first stop chevron to work with Stop 1   Choose a green color. 

 Set the stop posi on at 5% by either using the spin bu on or drag‐ ging the chevron   Set the transparency to 25% to make a lighter green   Click the Stop 2 chevron   Choose white as the color   Set the stop posi on to 95%  The result is a 2‐color gradient from dark green at the top to white at the bo om 

(16)

 Using a  Picture or Texture 

 When you select the Picture or Texture op on, texture is the default se ng, and you can select a texture of your  choice using the Texture bu on.   To use a picture, click the File or Clip Art bu on and browse to locate a picture to insert   Use your Picture as Texture check box to create a repea ng image across the background   You can adjust the size of the image using the offsets set out below the Stretch Op ons heading   You can lighten the background image, and thus make it less intrusive, by using the Transparency slider at the bo om  of the box. 

(17)

Controlling 3‐D Rota on in a 3‐D Chart  

 A number of op ons are available for rota ng a 3‐D chart. Of the available op ons, you are most likely to change the X rota on  and leave the other angels alone: 

 X‐Rota on: Turns the floor of the chart clockwise, then counter clockwise 359.9 degrees 

 Y‐Rota on: Tilts the chart up and down from +90 to ‐90 degrees. For best results use a value from 0‐20 degrees.   Perspec ve: Adds distor on to a chart causing close items to be unusually large and items further away to be smaller. 

You need to uncheck Right Angle Axis box in order for this feature to work.   Depth: Increasing the depth causes columns to become wide rectangles.    Height:  Clear the Auto Scale check box to enable the Height se ng . You can choose a value from 0‐500 percent of the  base  X = 20°  Y = 30°  Z = 0°  Perspec ve = 75°  X = 10°  Y = ‐20°  Z = 0°  Perspec ve = 60°  X = 0°  Y = 0°  Z = 0°  Perspec ve = 100°  X = 0°  Y = ‐90°  Z = 0°  Perspec ve = 0° 

(18)

Analysis

 

Command

 

Group

 

Trendlines

 

 A trendline a empts to fit exis ng data points to a formula and extend that formula for exis ng points or into the future.   To add a trendline, select: 

 Layout Trendline Linear Trendline 

 Excel asks which series it should add the trendline toSelect the series and press OK   To format a trendline: 

 right‐click the trendline select Format Trendline Op ons in the Format Trendline dialog box allow you to  change the line color and the line style. 

 Choosing a forecast method 

 In business a linear trendline is used most o en, which assumes a constant rate of progress throughout the life of the  chart. 

 Several other forecast methods are available for trendlines: 

 Exponen al Trendline: Used most o en in science. It describes a popula on that is rapidly increasing over suc‐ cessive genera ons such as the number of fungi in a petri dish over a period of  me. 

 Logarithm Trendline: Results when there is an ini al period of rapid growth that levels off over  me. 

 Polynomial Trendline: Can describe a line that undulates due to two to six external factors. When you specify a  polynomial trendline, you have to specify which order of polynomial.  For example, in a third order polynomial,  the line is fit to the equa on Y=b+c1x+c2x2+c3x3x. 

 Power Trendline: Fits the points to a line, where y=cxb. This describes a line that increases at a specific exponen‐ al rate over  me. 

 Moving Average Trendline: Used to smooth out data that fluctuates over  me. A typical trendline would use a  three‐month moving average. 

(19)
(20)

 Adding Drop Lines to a Line or Area Chart 

 A drop line is a ver cal line that extends from a point on a line or area chart down to the corre‐ sponding value on the horizontal axis.  

 It’s purpose is to make it easier for the reader to discern the exact value of data points.   To add a drop line select: Layout Lines Drop Lines 

 Adding High/Low and Up/Down Bars to a Line Chart 

 These lines and  Bars enable you to compare two series at each point along the horizontal axis. 

 There are two different op ons for this comparison that are available in the two loca ons along the Layout tab   High‐Low lines extend from one line to the other:   

 Select Layout Lines High‐Low Lines   Up/Down Bars extend from one line to the other. 

 These bars appear in contras ng colors, depending on which line is higher at that par cular point   Select: Layout UP/Down Bars Up/Down Bars 

(21)

 

 Showing Acceptable Tolerances by Using Error Bars   Error bars tell you the acceptable range 

of tolerance for a given range of sta s‐ cs, and when that tolerance has been  exceeded. 

 Select one series in the chart and then  select Layout Error Bars More  Error Bar Op ons   In the Format Error Bars dialog, select  whether you want the error bars to ex‐ tend up, down or both from the line.   You can add a cap (op onal).   In the lower sec on specify one of the  five methods for calcula ng the size of  the error bar. 

 Based on the standard devia on, specify that the error bars should extend a fixed number of units. 

Forma ng

 

a

 

Series

 

 Ini ate the Format Series Dialog by double‐ clicking or right clicking one of the series in a  chart, or using the Current Selec on drop‐ down box in the le  side of the Layout ribbon  and selec ng Series and clicking the Format  Selec on bu on. 

 The Series Op ons category allows you to plot a series on a secondary axis, which is helpful if one data series contains data that is of a  different order of magnitude than the other series. 

(22)

markers are drawn on top of each other   Using the remaining categories, you can edit the Marker style for a series, including the marker color, line color, line style, shadow and  3‐D forma ng. 

Forma ng a Single Data Point 

 When you click a single data point once, all the data points in a series are selected.   When you double‐click, only that data point is selected.   Once you have clicked a data point twice, you can proceed to modify it using the Format dialog box 

 Selec ng a single data label is helpful if you have two labels on top of each other and you need to move one to another posi on. 

 

The

 

Format

 

Tab

 

The Format tab contains icons that enable you to micromanage the color, fill, outline, and effects for any individual chart element. For example, if you want  to apply a so  glow, a metal finish, and a reflec on to the January data point, you can do so using the Format tab. 

 Conver ng Text to WordArt 

 The WordArt Styles on the Format tab is used to apply WordArt styles to any text on a chart.  

(23)

 Shape Styles  The Shape Styles gallery contains 6 built‐in styles for six accent  colors in the current theme. The six styles progress from   simple on the first row to extreme on the last row.   To format a par cular element, click that element and  choose a new style from the gallery   The styles and effects change if you change the theme   Using Shape Fill and Shape Effects  In addi on to the shape styles, you can add custom‐ ized effects using the Shape Fill, Shape Outline and  Shape Effects drop‐downs on the Format tab 

 Replacing Data Markers with Clip Art or Shapes 

Using Clip Art as a Data Marker  Follow these steps to create a pictograph:   In a 2‐D column chart, select a data series. Right‐click the data series and select Format Data Series   Select the Fill category in the Le  panel   In the right panel choose Picture or Texture Fill   Click the ClipArt bu on. Excel displays a shortened version of the ClipArt panel.    Select Picture   Select the Include Content from Office Online check box.   In the Search Text Box, type a keyword to describe the clip art and then click Go   Browse through the returned images. You are looking for something that is cartoonish and narrow. Rather than clip art with ta de‐ tailed background, look for clip art where only the character appears. When you find an acceptable image, click OK  Click the border Color category and select No Line.  Click Close to close the Format Data Series dialog 

(24)

 Using a Shape in Place of a Data Marker 

The fill se ngs on the Format Data Series dialog do not allow you to specify a shape. However they allow you to import a shape from the clipboard. 

 Create a 2‐D column chart   Select a cell in the worksheet.    From the Insert menu, choose an upward arrow from the Shapes drop‐down.   Click and drag to draw an arrow on the worksheet   Right‐click the shape and then select Copy.   Click the data series in the chart   Right‐click and select Format Data Series.   In the Format Data Series dialog that appears, choose the Fill category in the le  panel.   In the right panel, choose Picture or Texture Fill 

 In the Insert From sec on, click the Clipboard bu on. Excel replaces the columns with the arrows.  Click Close to close the Format Data  

(25)
(26)

Types of Charts

Column Charts

 

Column Chart shows data changes over a period of  me or illustrates comparisons among items. Categories are  organized horizontally, values ver cally, to emphasize varia on over  me. Stacked column charts show the rela‐

onship of individual items to the whole. The 3‐D perspec ve column chart compares data points along two axes. 

Clustered

 

column

 

and

 

clustered

 

column

 

in

 

3

D

     

Clustered column charts compare values across categories. A clustered column chart displays values in 2‐D ver cal rectangles. A clustered col‐ umn in 3‐D chart displays the data by using a 3‐D perspec ve only. A third value axis (depth axis) is not used.  You can use a clustered column chart type when you have categories that represent:   Ranges of values (for example, item counts).   Specific scale arrangements (for example, a Likert scale with entries, such as strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, strongly disagree).  0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000

July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

2008 2009 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000

July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

2008 2009

(27)

Stacked

 

column

 

and

 

stacked

 

column

 

in

 

3

D

     

Stacked column charts show the rela onship of individual items to the whole, comparing the contribu on of each value to a total across catego‐ ries. A stacked column chart displays values in 2‐D ver cal stacked rectangles.  

A 3‐D stacked column chart displays the data by using a 3‐D perspec ve only. A third value axis (depth axis) is not used.    You can use a stacked column chart when you have mul ple data series and when you want to emphasize the total. 

100%

 

stacked

 

column

 

and

 

100%

 

stacked

 

column

 

in

 

3

D

     

100% stacked column charts and 100% stacked column in 3‐D charts compare the percentage that each value contributes to a total across cate‐ gories. A 100% stacked column chart displays values in 2‐D ver cal 100% stacked rectangles.  

You can use a 100% stacked column chart when you have two or more data series and you want to emphasize the contribu ons to the whole,  especially if the total is the same for each category. 

(28)

3

D

 

Column

     

3‐D column charts use three axes that you can modify (a horizontal axis, a ver cal axis, and a  depth axis), and they compare data points along the horizontal and the depth axes. You can  use a 3‐D column chart when you want to compare data across the categories and across the  series equally, because this chart type shows categories along both the horizontal axis and the  depth axis, whereas the ver cal axis displays the values.         

Cylinder,

 

cone,

 

and

 

pyramid

     

Cylinder, cone, and pyramid charts are available in the same clustered, stacked, 100% stacked, and 3‐D chart types that are provided for rectangu‐ lar column charts, and they show and compare data the same way. The only difference is that these chart types display cylinder, cone, and pyra‐ mid shapes instead of rectangles.    2008 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000

July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

2008 2009

(29)

Line Charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plotted in a line chart. Line charts can display continuous data over time, set against a common scale, and are therefore ideal for showing trends in data at equal intervals.

In a line chart, category data is distributed evenly along the horizontal axis, and all value data is distributed evenly along the vertical axis.

You should use a line chart if your category labels are text, and are representing evenly spaced values such as months, quarters, or iscal years. This is especially true if there are multiple series — for one series, you should consider using a scatter chart.

You should also use a line chart if you have several evenly spaced numeric labels, espe-cially years. If you have more than ten numeric labels, use a scatter chart instead.

Line

 

and

 

line

 

with

 

markers

     

Displayed with markers to indicate individual data values, or without, line charts are useful to show trends over time or ordered categories, especially when there are many data points and the order in which they are presented is important. If there are many categories or the val-ues are approximate, use a line chart without markers. 

(30)

100%

 

stacked

 

line

 

and

 

100%

 

stacked

 

line

 

with

 

markers

     

Displayed with markers to indicate individual data values, or without, 100% stacked line charts are useful to show the trend of the percentage each value contributes over time or ordered categories. If there are many categories or the values are approximate, use a 100% stacked line chart without markers. For a better presentation of this type of data, consider using a 100% stacked area chart instead.

3

D

 

line

     

3‐D line charts show each row or column of data as a 3‐D ribbon. A 3‐D line chart has horizontal, ver cal, and depth axes that you can modify   2008 2009 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2008 2009

(31)

Pie Charts

Pie charts show the size of items in one data series, proportional to the sum of the items. They are good for comparing two to five different components. You typically select a range that contains category labels in Column A and values in Column B. Categories are generally sorted so that the largest value is at the top and the other values are sorted in descending order

Excel gives you choices about what you can display in data labels in the For-mat Data Labels dialog, as illustrated on the right. You can also edit each indi-vidual label by clicking inside it. The leader lines category is helpful if you have to move a label outside, as in the 3-D table below, if the slice is too nar-row to adequately fit the label. The leader line appears automatically to link

Pie

 

and

 

pie

 

in

 

3

D

     

Pie charts display the contribu on of each value to a total in a 2‐D or 3‐D format. Showing both the value and the category is par cularly  helpful if you have to display the chart in black and white 

(32)

Pie

 

of

 

Pie

 

and

 

Bar

 

of

 

Pie

     

 

Pie of pie or bar of pie charts display pie charts with user‐defined values that are extracted from the main pie chart and combined into a secondary 

Exploded

 

pie

 

and

 

exploded

 

pie

 

in

 

3

D

    

 Exploded pie charts display the contribu on of each value to a total while emphasizing individual values. Exploded pie charts can be displayed in 3‐ D format. You can change the pie explosion se ng for all slices and individual slices, but you cannot move the slices of an exploded pie manually.  

(33)

Bar

charts

 Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plo ed in a bar chart.    Bar charts illustrate comparisons among individual items, as opposed to column charts which  are be er for displaying trends.    Bar charts can be used to show how something changes over  me or to compare different  mes.  

 The default for ver cal axis in bar charts is star ng from the bo om and reading up. You can  change this  by going into Axis Op ons and checking the box marked Categories in Reverse 

(34)

Clustered

 

Bar

 

and

 

clustered

 

Bar

 

in

 

3

D

     

Clustered bar charts compare values across categories. In a clustered bar chart, the categories are typically organized along the ver cal axis, and  the values along the horizontal axis. A clustered bar in 3‐D chart displays the horizontal rectangles in 3‐D format; it does not display the data on  three axes . Note that Axis labels cannot be shown within bars in clustered 3D; they can only be shown outside the bars, as illustrated below. 

(35)

Stacked

 

bar

 

and

 

stacked

 

bar

 

in

 

3

D

     

Stacked bar charts show the rela onship of individual items to the whole.  It is mainly used to show the significance of one par cular item  in rela‐

100%

 

stacked

 

bar

 

and

 

100%

 

stacked

 

bar

 

in

 

3

D

     

This type of chart compares the percentage that each value contributes to a total across categories. This type of chart is similar to a pie  chart in func on. Below is an example depic ng the number of inquires received by a computer lab help desk by type and by month. You  could also use this type of chart to show the breakdown of the amount of  me spent on various aspects of a project, the cost of the sub‐

(36)

Horizontal

 

cylinder,

 

cone,

 

and

 

pyramid

     

These charts are available in the same clustered, stacked, and 100% stacked chart types that are provided for rectangular bar charts. They show  and compare data the same way. The only difference is that these chart types display cylinder, cone, and pyramid shapes instead of horizontal  rectangles.   0% 50% 100% July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2008 2009

(37)

Area charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plotted in an area chart. Area charts emphasize the magnitude of change over time, and can be used to draw attention to the total value across a trend. They are a type of presentation graphic that emphasizes a change in values by filling in the portion of the graph be-neath the line connecting various data points. For example, data that represents profit over time can be plotted in an area chart to emphasize the total profit.

By displaying the sum of the plotted values, an area chart also shows the relationship

2-D area and 3-D area

Whether they are shown in 2-D or in 3-D, area charts display the trend of values over time or other category data. 3-D area charts use three axes (horizontal, vertical, and depth) that you can modify. As a rule, you should consider using a line chart instead of a

(38)

Stacked Area and Stacked Area in 3-D

Stacked area charts display the trend of the contribution of each value over time or other category data. A stacked area chart in 3-D is displayed in the same way but uses a 3-D perspective. A 3-D perspective is not a true 3-D chart — a third value axis (depth axis) is not used.

100%

 

stacked

 

area

 

and

 

100%

 

stacked

 

area

 

in

 

3

D

     

100% stacked area charts display the trend of the percentage that each value contributes over  me or other category data. A 100% stacked area  chart in 3‐D is displayed in the same way but uses a 3‐D perspec ve. A 3‐D perspec ve is not a true 3‐D chart — a third value axis (depth axis) is 

(39)

XY (scatter) charts

Data that is arranged in columns and rows on a worksheet can be plotted in an xy

(scatter) chart. Scatter charts show the relationships among the numeric values in several data series, or plot two groups of numbers as one series of xy coordinates.

A scatter chart has two value axes, showing one set of numeric data along the horizontal axis (x-axis) and another along the vertical axis (y-axis). It combines these values into sin-gle data points and displays them in irregular intervals, or clusters. Scatter charts are typically used for displaying and comparing numeric values, such as scientific, statistical, and engineering data.

 Consider using a scatter chart when you want to compare many data points without regard to time — the more data that you include in a scatter chart, the better the comparisons that you can make.

 Values for horizontal axis are not evenly spaced.

To arrange data on a worksheet for a scatter chart, you should place the x values in one row or column, and then enter the corre-sponding y values in the adjacent rows or columns.

Use a sca er chart with data markers but  without lines when you use many data  points and connec ng lines would make the  data more difficult to read. You can also use  this chart type when you do not have to 

(40)

Sca er

 

Charts

 

with

 

Lines—Sorted

 

and

 

Unsorted

 

You can use lines to connect the points of a sca er chart, as illustrated below. However, lines can be confusing and decep ve because when you  add lines, Excel treats the sca er chart as a line chart a emp ng to show a trend rather than a rela onship.  

In the first example, we used the data in the order it appears on the previous page, and Excel connected the points in that order going back and  forth along the x axis and crea ng total confusion. 

In the second example, we sorted the data form lowest to highest in the Educa on column and Excel plo ed the line like it would on a line chart.   The last chart shows what happens if we format the data, unsorted, as a line chart; the result is confusing. 

(41)

Stock charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows in a specific order on a worksheet can be plotted in a stock chart.

As its name implies, a stock chart is most often used to illustrate the fluctuation of stock prices. However, this chart may also be used for scientific data.

For example, you could use a stock chart to indicate the fluctuation of daily or annual tem-peratures. You must organize your data in the correct order to create stock charts.

The way stock chart data is organized in the worksheet is very important. For example, to create a simple high-low-close stock chart, you should arrange your data with High, Low, and Close entered as column headings, in that or

High

low

close

     

The high‐low‐close stock chart is o en used to illustrate stock prices. It requires three series of values in the following  order: high, low, and then close.   0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 7/1/2011 7/2/2011 7/3/2011 7/4/2011 7/5/2011 7/6/2011 7/7/2011

(42)

Open

high

low

close

     

This type of stock chart requires four series of values in the correct order (open, high, low, and then close).  

Volume

open

high

low

close

     

0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Open Hi Low Close 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000 400,000 450,000 Volume Open Hi Low Close

(43)

Surface charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plotted in a surface chart. A sur-face chart is useful when you want to find optimum combinations between two sets of data. As in a topographic map, colors and patterns indicate areas that are in the same range of values.

3

D

 

surface

     

3‐D surface charts show trends in values across two dimensions in a con nuous curve. Color bands in a surface chart do not represent the data  series; they represent the difference between the values. This chart shows a 3‐D view of the data, which can be imagined as a rubber sheet  stretched over a 3‐D column chart. It is typically used to show rela onships between large amounts of data that may otherwise be difficult to see.   10 20 30 40 50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 450-500 400-450 350-400 300-350 250-300 200-250 150-200 100-150 50-100 0-50

(44)

Wireframe

 

3

D

 

surface

     

 

Contour

    

  Contour charts are surface charts viewed from above, similar to 2‐D topographic maps. In a contour chart, color  bands represent specific ranges of values. The lines in a contour chart connect interpolated points of equal value.   10 20 30 40 50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 Axi s Ti tl e Axis Title Chart Title 450-500 400-450 350-400 300-350 250-300 200-250 150-200 100-150 50-100 0-50 10 20 30 40 50 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 400-500 300-400 200-300 100-200 0-100

(45)

Doughnut charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plotted in a doughnut chart. Like a pie chart, a doughnut chart shows the relationship of parts to a whole, but it can contain more than one data series.   Doughnut charts are not easy to read. You may want to use a stacked column or

stacked bar chart instead

Doughnut

 

2

D

 

and

 

3

D

 

Charts

  

  

Doughnut charts display data in rings, where each ring represents a data series. If percentages are displayed in data labels, each ring will total 100%.  

Exploded

 

Doughnut

 

Charts

   

 

Much like exploded pie charts, exploded doughnut charts display the contribution of each value to a total while emphasizing indi-vidual values, but they can contain more than

2005 

(46)

Bubble

charts

A type of chart in which each plo ed en ty is defined in terms of three dis nct numeric parameters. The  en es displayed on a bubble chart can be compared in terms of their size as well as their rela ve posi‐

ons with respect to each numeric axis. Bubble charts can facilitate the understanding of the social, eco‐ nomical, medical, and other scien fic rela onships.  

Bubble

 

with

 

2D

 

or

 

3

D

 

e

ect

     

Both bubble chart types compare sets of three values instead of two. The third value deter‐ mines the size of the bubble marker. You can choose to display bubbles in 2‐D format or with  a 3‐D effect.    $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 $70,000 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Sa le s No. of Products Product Performance Series1 $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 $70,000 0 5 10 15 20 25 30

(47)

Radar

charts

Data that is arranged in columns or rows on a worksheet can be plo ed in a radar chart. Radar charts com‐ pare the aggregate values of several data series. They allow you to see the rela onship between four to six  variables and  see the big picture more quickly. 

Applica ons

 

Radar charts are used for such things as:   Control of quality improvement to display the performance metrics of any ongoing program.   Sports applica ons to chart players' strengths and weaknesses, where they are usually called  spider charts 

Radar,

 

Radar

 

with

 

Markers

 

and

 

Radars

 

Filled

 

In

   

 

With or without markers for individual data points, radar charts display changes in values rela‐ ve to a center point, in this case average temperatures in Bermuda, Sydney and Memphis, at  various  mes of the year. 

(48)

Thermometer

 

Charts

 

Crea ng

 

a

 

chart

 

that

 

acts

 

like

 

a

 

thermometer

 

1.  Start with a table that lists Days from Day 1— Day 15 (see example below using Auto fill.  2.  At the bo om enter labels: Goal, Current and % (see example below) 

3.  Insert numbers from 90 to 150 in the first 7 days  4.  In the Goal cell enter 1000 

5.  In the Current field enter the formula =SUM(U6:U20)(or whatever range  applies to your worksheet) 

6.  In the % field =U23/U22 and format the field as a percentage(in class worksheet)  7.  With the percentage field selected, insert a Column Cylinder Chart next to your table  8.  Select the Design tab under the Chart Tools menu and click the design circled be‐

low 

9.  Right click the blue cylinder and select Format Data Series 

10.  Select Series Op ons and move the sliders for the width and depth gaps as neces‐ sary 

11.  Under Chart Tools, click on Layout and select Data Labels>Show 

12.  When the data  label appears in the 

plot area, move it  to the center of the 

cylinder and en‐ large as appropriate 

(49)

Combina on

 

Charts

 

Change one of the series in a bar chart to a line chart to enhance the comparison of the two data series.

1. Select the series (bars) that you want to change 2. Right click and select Change Series Chart Type 3. Select Line and choose a line chart type

4. Press OK, and the line appears over the top of the other series bar

                       

(50)

Sparklines

 

Sparkline charts are small, high resolu on line graphs embedded in a context of words, numbers, or images.   Sparklines are data‐intense, design‐simple, word‐sized graphics. that illustrate a single trend.  

They do not include axes or labels; context comes from the related content.   

Usually, when a graph is included in a report, the reader has to break concentra on and take  me to study the graph.  A sparkline  minimizes the  me it takes to understand what is being displayed by the graph. Sparklines commonly display trends over  me,  but they can be used to show any trend that could be displayed on a line graph.  They are o en used to illustrate stock trends,  weather trends or produc on rates over  me.   

Steps for crea ng a Sparkline  1.  Select a data range  2.  On the Insert Tab, in the Sparkline sec on, select either Line, Column or Win‐Loss.  3.  When the Sparkline dialog appears, click in a cell to specify the loca on in which you want the Sparkline to appear.  4.  Click OK. The Sparkline appears in the selected cell  To Insert it into a Word document, copy it and paste it as a picture.   

Op ons on the Sparkline Tools Design ribbon include:   Changing the type of chart   Showing various points along the chart   Changing styles and marker colors    Several axis op‐ ons   

Figure

Updating...

References