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Counseling

Student Handbook

2008 - 2012

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Introduction

This Handbook provides details about programs in Counseling that will supplement information contained in the current Graduate School catalog. To make the best use of this Handbook, you should be familiar with the Graduate Catalog. We have attempted for the Handbook to pre-sent additional information rather than simply repeat material from the Catalog. Course descriptions and specific course requirements for pro-gram tracks that are presented in the Catalog are not repeated in this Handbook.

The Counseling Department is responsible to various certifying bod-ies within the academic and professional community. Therefore the De-partment reserves the right to make necessary changes in the curricula, standards, and requirements in order to comply with these organizations and to provide the highest standard of academic and professional train-ing. The Counseling Program is NCATE and CACREP accredited and will also continue to meet the standards for Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification for school counselors. Students should contact their Advisor regarding any program changes that may have been made since the printing of this Handbook and the current Graduate Catalog.

Copies of this Handbook are distributed to all students currently en-rolled in the Counseling program. Students are responsible for following the policies and procedures that are detailed in the Graduate School Cata-log and this Handbook. Following these policies and procedures will enhance the likelihood of success in achieving students’ training goals. Failure to follow these policies and procedures can lead to serious prob-lems in terms of program completion. Please contact your Advisor or the Department Chair if you have questions about any information contained in this Handbook. Please forward any comments or specific suggestions for improvement to your Advisor, the Department Secretary, or the De-partment Chair. We hope that this Handbook is helpful as you plan and achieve your training objectives in the Department.

Faculty and Staff

Note that all offices are in the McGowan Center for Graduate and Professional Studies. Unless otherwise indicated, phone numbers listed are extension numbers that are reached after calling the main Marywood

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National Board of Certified Counselors, Inc.

3 Terrace Way, Suite D Greensboro, NC 27403-3660 Tel: 336-547-0607

www.nbcc.org

Related Web Sites

U.S. Federal Government Mental Health Web Sites

National Institute of Mental Health... www.nimh.nih.gov Center for Mental Health Services Knowledge Exchange Network (KEN) ... www.mentalhealth.org

Family/Volunteer/Consumer Organization Web Sites

Alliance for Children and Families ...www.alliance1.org Anxiety Disorders Association of America...www.adaa.org Bazelon Center of Mental Health Law...www.bazelon.org Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation ... www.bpkids.org Children and Adults with ADHD... www.chadd.org Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health ... www.ffcmh.org National Alliance for the Mentally Ill ... www.nami.org National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders ... www.anad.org National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Associationwww.ndmda.org National Depression Screening Day... www.mentalhealthscreening.org National Mental Health Association ... www.nmha.org

Professional Organization Web Sites

American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... www.aacap.org Psychiatry

American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry ...www.aagpgpa.org American Association of Marriage and ... www.aamft.org and Family Therapy

American Association of ………www.artausa.org/ arta/

number (570-348-6211).

Faculty

John Lemoncelli, Ed.D., Professor. Room 1031, Ext. 2317 lemoncelli@marywood.edu

Bradley Janey, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Room 1025, Ext. 2494

janey@marywood.edu

Shamshad Ahmed, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Room 1020, Ext. 2319

sahmed@es.marywood.edu

Janet Muse-Burke, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Room 1029, Ext. 2367 Muse-burke@es.marywood.edu Support Staff Patricia Kurilla. Room 1032, 570-348-6270 kurilla@marywood.edu Elizabeth Graziano Room 1034, 570-348-6226 Graziano@es.marywood.edu

Department Philosophy and Objectives

Department Philosophy

Psychology and Counseling programs at the graduate level are of-fered by the Psychology and Counseling Department (along with offering program tracks at the undergraduate level). As is consistent with the Uni-versity’s mission statement, our graduate programs provide students with a variety of coherent training experiences that lead to diverse career paths in school counseling, agency mental health work, school psychology, and preparation for advanced training at the doctoral level. The two major graduate programs in the Department, Psychology and Counseling, work

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collaboratively with one another to maximize student training opportuni-ties. Such collaboration includes flexibility of scheduling so that all stu-dents in the department can readily include appropriate electives from both Psychology and Counseling. While there is collaboration between the two programs, differences in training approaches should be appreci-ated by incoming students. For example, the Counseling programs tend to emphasize a blend of theory, professional practice, and experiential elements in student training whereas the Psychology programs emphasize core knowledge in scientific methods and empirical research, psychologi-cal theories, and professional skill development in applications of psy-chology in the mental health field.

Collaboration between the Psychology and Counseling programs allows for more effective development of training resources. For exam-ple, faculty routinely teach in both programs. Likewise, program collabo-ration makes it possible for faculty and students to have access to a wider range of physical resources such as computers, research, and clinical training facilities. Finally, effective collaboration between Psychology and Counseling faculty helps to prepare students for the interdisciplinary world they will encounter in their practice and research as professionals in the field.

Training in the fields of Psychology and Counseling requires careful consideration of ethical and professional guidelines for practice. Ethical and professional practice issues are considered throughout the curriculum in numerous courses. A special focus is provided on multicul-tural issues when they apply to either academic content or applied clini-cal practice. Professional guidelines provide for awareness of both one’s areas of expertise and the limits of one’s expertise. Careful attention is devoted to providing students with competencies and, equally important, with an awareness of personal limits. Through courses and advisement, students are made aware of professional standards for practice, certifica-tion and licensing guidelines, and nacertifica-tional standards of the professions of Psychology and Counseling. Each specific program considers practice issues in relation to level of training (e.g., master’s-level versus doctoral-level).

For example, master’s-level training in elementary counseling is suffi-cient to meet state certification requirements for practice whereas doc-toral-level training is currently required to meet state licensing standards in psychology. At the time this handbook is being written, regulations are being finalized at the state level which provide for licensure of

counsel-Alexandria, VA 22304-3300 Tel: 800-347-6647

Fax: 703-823-0252

Pennsylvania Counseling Association—PCA

** Student fee $20.00 PCA P.O. Box 41118 Pittsburgh, PA 15202 Tel: 800-338-8806 www.pacounseling.org

American Mental Health Counselors Association—AMHCA

** Student fee $60.00

American Mental Health Counselors Association 801 N. Fairfax Street, Suite 304

Alexandria, VA 22314

Tel: 800-326-2642 or 703-548-6002 Fax: 703-548-4775

www.amhca.org

American School Counselors Association—ASCA

** Student fee $45.00

American School Counselors Association 1101 King Street Suite 625

Alexandria, VA 22314 Tel: 800-306-4722 Fax: 703-683-1619 www.schoolcounselor.org

American Specialists of Group Work—ASGW

$$ Student fee $106.00 Linda P. Keel, Ph.D. P.O. Box 6475 Stateline-Lake Tahoe, NV 89449 Tel: 755-599-7794 asgw.educ.kent.edu

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The Chi Sigma Iota Newsletter is a source of information, ideas, events, and people with whom you may correspond. Short articles, an-nouncements, chapter activities, and letters to the editor are solicited. Membership dues are $35 for the first year and $25 for annual renewal. New members’ dues include a Certificate which is hand-lettered with your name, the name of the chapter, and University. New members also receive a membership card and lapel pin.

Applications for membership are available from the Department Secretary.

** First year membership $35.00 ** Annual Renewal $25.00 ** Life Membership $500.00

Chi Sigma Iota P.O. Box 35448

Greensboro, NC 27425-5448 Tel: 336-841-8180

www.csi-net.org

Associations

Students are encouraged to join relevant organizations of counselors at as early a point in their training as is possible. Membership in such organizations provides numerous benefits, including: (1) access to pro-fessional journals that help keep students up-to-date with current issues in the field; (2) involvement in professional conferences, both as an at-tendee and as a potential presenter; (3) access to insurance policies that cover professional liability (e.g., while on internship); and 4) newsletters and on-line discussion groups that keep students informed of current is-sues in the field. Application materials for the following professional groups are available in the Department office and in the Counseling Li-brary: American Counseling Association.

American Counseling Association—ACA

** Student fee $85.00

American Counseling Association 5999 Stevenson Avenue

ors. Students will be informed of the requirements for such licensure and appropriate training opportunities will be developed for students inter-ested in seeking such licensure.

Department Objectives

Department objectives include student development in the areas of:

(1) Knowledge of the complexity of human behavior in the interac-tion of developmental, psychological, biological, and social in-fluences.

(2) Awareness of cultural diversity issues in the fields of Psychol-ogy and Counseling.

(3) Competence in the use of professional assessment, intervention, and program management skills in their areas of specialization. (4) Awareness of the limits of one’s skills and the need for

appro-priate supervision and consultation from other professionals. (5) Knowledge of appropriate practice guidelines in relation to

ar-eas of Psychology and Counseling and in relation to other pro-fessions.

(6) Ability to critically evaluate the strengths and limits of current professional practices.

(7) Development of research skills that allow ongoing professional development and awareness of changes in professional and sci-entific aspects of the fields of Psychology and Counseling. (8) Commitment to ethical guidelines in research and professional

work.

(9) Capability of self-evaluation in recognizing limits of one’s skills, training, and ability.

(10) Personal values that involve a respect for human dignity and worth.

Counseling Program

Mission Statement and Program Objectives

Mission Statement

The mission statement of the Master of Science in Counselor Educa-tion, (Secondary), Master of Science in Counselor EducaEduca-tion,

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(Elementary), and Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling programs is as follows:

The mission of the graduate program in school and mental health counseling is to train masters-level students to be ethical and caring deci-sion-makers who attend to the varied developmental needs of individuals in K-12 and agency settings. Housed in a comprehensive regional institu-tion steeped in the Catholic tradiinstitu-tion, the Marywood counseling program, its faculty and curricular experiences, inspire and transform students to learn, lead and serve in a diverse and changing world. Within this con-text, the education of the whole person is paramount. The standards-based curriculum is rigorous; faculty expectations are high; and students are challenged to understand and apply the ethical dimensions of per-sonal and professional life and to examine their own attitudes, values and beliefs.

Bearing this in mind, while endeavoring to synthesize and integrate the general education and the professional preparation of its prospective counselors, the faculty of the Department of Counseling and Psychology sets forth the following program objectives:

1. Apply the knowledge base of the field of counseling to design, implement and evaluate empirically supported individual, group, and organizational interventions in school and mental health settings.

2. Assume roles as professional counselors in school and mental health settings as described by professional organizations and credentialing bodies (i.e., CACREP, NCC, ACA, ASCA, etc.) 3. Translate accepted counseling theory, learning theory, and

prin-ciples of human development to normative and non-normative patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving and generate effective research-based interventions for individuals, groups and fami-lies.

4. Describe and adjust to societal changes and trends in a multicul-tural society.

5. Demonstrate the capacity for self-examination, self-evaluation and an ability to form effective helping relationships with di-verse individuals and groups.

6. Demonstrate mastery of the facilitative factors that influence the helping process including effective counselors and client charac-teristics, including but not limited to age, gender, racial/ethnic background, socioeconomic status, disability, spirituality and

*See Certification office in Dept. of Education

12 Credits

• Apply for Candidacy – See dept. secretary for appropriate docu-mentation

33-40 Credits

• While registered for Counseling Techniques (Coun. 544) con-sult with advisor re: Practicum & Internship sites.

• Comprehensive Exams (CPCE & Case) • National Counseling Exam (NCE)

48 - 60 Credits

• Apply for Graduation

Honor Society

Chi Sigma Iota

Chi Sigma Iota is an international honor society of counseling pro-fessionals and propro-fessionals-in-training dedicated to excellence in schol-arship, research, and clinical practice. The purpose of Chi Sigma Iota is to promote and recognize exemplary attainment in the study and practice of counseling.

Students enrolled in Counseling programs leading to graduate de-grees are eligible for membership. Students must have attained a QPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and must have completed a minimum of 24 credits in Counseling. Faculty, alumni, and professional counselors who have given evidence of distinguished scholarship and professional service are also eligible.

Membership in Chi Sigma Iota can make a valuable contribution to your professional development. Membership involves you in a network of professionals who ascribe to high standards of scholarship and prac-tice. Local chapters encourage these aspirations through speakers, pro-grams, and awards. The international headquarters of this organization also provides leadership through a variety of activities including a news-letter, member and chapter roster maintenance, annual recognition awards, support services to chapters, and an annual meeting.

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Supervisory Meetings

• Students will meet with the coordinator of the internship pro-gram weekly during the semester. Dates and times of meetings will be determined at the beginning of the semester. Attendance at supervisory meetings is mandatory.

Syllabus

• The Internship Supervisor will prepare a written syllabus each semester to provide further details regarding specific evaluation procedures and other details related to the internship experience.

Eligibility

Complete documentation and contracts must be signed one month prior to the starting date of the internship. No exceptions can be permit-ted.

An example of the “Memorandum of Agreement” required for Counseling Internships is presented in Appendix B.

After consulting with the Marywood internship supervisor, students are instructed to contact the department secretary for assistance in devel-oping the “Memorandum of Agreement” prior to registration for intern-ship. The department secretary will provide the students with the “Student Internship Information Sheet” to follow in order for their con-tracts to be done accurately and in a timely manner.

Timeline for Graduate Students in Counseling

The following is designed to help students identify and summa-rize critical points in which action needs to be taken by the student. It is recommended that students consult this timeline periodically during their graduate training at Marywood University.

0 Credits:

• Meet with your advisor

• Arrange to take the first Praxis exams (General subject test: School Counseling only)*

• Apply for Child Abuse Clearances* (Required annually)

sexual orientation factors that might bear on the success of the helping process.

7. Develop a mastery of consultation skills; and the philosophical and theoretical frameworks that under gird the process. 8. Translate the theory of group development, dynamics,

leader-ship styles, and group counseling and classroom guidance meth-ods into effective group interventions in educational and mental health settings.

9. Demonstrate the capacity to apply educational/vocational plan-ning, career development and decision-making theory, and knowledge of career assessment and information systems to facilitate the career development of clients in school and mental health settings.

10. Acquire a sufficient knowledge base to use formal and informal assessment procedures to identify needs, strengths and foci of interventions, and assess counseling interventions and program-matic outcomes and effectiveness.

11. Develop sufficient knowledge and skills to Understand and util-ize counseling research, and evaluation results, and treatment protocols to guide counseling practice.

12. Exhibit professional behavior, skills and attitudes associated with competence in the core areas specified by CACREP Stan-dards.

13. Demonstrate ethical behavior and decision-making which is based on ACA and ASCA ethical standards, and understand the relevant legal issues in school and mental health settings. 14. Exhibit the professional leadership and social advocacy skills

necessary to serve as effective agents of change and advance the cause of diverse and underrepresented groups at a local, regional and national level.

Department Policies

Admission to the Department

Persons applying to the graduate programs in Psychology and Coun-seling must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and have demonstrated potential for graduate work ordinarily by having maintained at least a “B” average in undergraduate study. While a concentration in Psychology is not required, students must have taken undergraduate courses in Introductory Psychology, Statistics, and Human Development prior to enrollment in the Department (or as part of the requirements for advancement to candidacy in the Department).

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The graduate programs in Psychology and Counseling admit stu-dents on either Full or Provisional Status. This designation is determined by the credentials reviewed at the time of the admissions process. These credentials may include overall undergraduate QPA, undergraduate Psy-chology QPA, GRE or MAT scores, letters of recommendation, writing sample, and work experience.

All students who study in the graduate programs in the Psychology and Counseling Department, degree candidate or otherwise, are expected to provide appropriate credentials in support of their graduate status. Thus, those who desire courses for enrichment or other personal enroll-ment on an ad hoc basis for one semester must submit appropriate cre-dential materials, including application materials and transcripts.

Students should consult the current catalog concerning application procedures for both degree and certification programs. Information with regard to scholarship and graduate assistantship programs is also pre-sented in the catalog. Application forms for scholarship and assistantship programs are available from the CEHD Dean's Office.

Full Admission Status and Probationary Status

Students are admitted to Full Acceptance Status by having met the General Requirements of the Reap College of Education and Human velopment (CEHD) as well as the requirements of the Department. De-partment requirements for admission include:

• Undergraduate QPA of at least 3.0 • GRE or MAT scores at least at the 50%ile

• Letters of recommendation that provide evidence of suitability for study in Psychology and Counseling

Full Acceptance Status is contingent upon the student maintaining a quality point average of 3.0 in graduate Psychology and Counseling courses. A student whose QPA falls below 3.0 at any point in their pro-gram of study will be placed on Probation. Students on Probation Status have one semester to bring their QPA up to 3.0. Failure to do so will re-sult in dismissal from the Department. Note that some program tracks in the Department require a grade of “B” or better in particular courses (see RCEHD Catalog for details).

with the assistance of the Supervising Counselor.

Length of interviews.

• This cannot be specified, other than generally. Twenty to forty minutes would be typical. Shorter interviews do not ordinarily allow for the establishment of an effective counseling relation-ship. Longer interviews are common as the counselor gains ex-perience.

Counseling ethics

• The American Counseling Association Code of Ethics must be followed in all phases of the internship.

Insurance

• When students enroll in Internship or Applied Practice classes, a fee is charged that provides liability insurance coverage. Stu-dents may check with the faculty teaching these courses to learn of the specific nature of this coverage.

Practicum

• Counseling 523 or Counseling 545, Applied Practice II, must be completed with a grade “B” or better before the counseling in-ternship begins.

Time requirements

• Interns will be expected to invest a minimum of 240 contact hours in counseling and related experiences at the internship site.

Log

• A log of dates, contact hours involved, and the nature of the involvement should be recorded and a typewritten/word proc-essed copy submitted to the Internship Supervisor at Marywood.

Evaluation

• The intern will submit his or her evaluation of the internship by completing the required evaluation forms. The Supervising Counselor will be asked to give an oral evaluation of the intern’s performance and to complete the Marywood “Evaluation of Counselor Trainee” forms.

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The Internship experience for the Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling is currently set at 900 clock hours. Students have the option of completing this within a 6 credit sequence or a 9 credit sequence. For example, students may take 3 credits over the summer or a given semes-ter, and complete 300 hours of Internship. This student could then regis-ter for an additional 3 credits of Inregis-ternship the following fall semesregis-ter and fulfill 600 hours of Internship (the equivalent of full-time employ-ment. Forty hours a week for 15 weeks). This hour sequence can also be reversed (i.e. 600 hours one semester and then 300 clock hours the next.) Or, a student may take 3 consecutive semesters of Internship at 3 credits each, completing 300 hours of Internship each semester.

The Internship experience for the Master of Science in Elemen-tary and Secondary School Counseling is currently set at 600 hours. Stu-dents have the option of completing this within a 3 or 6 credits sequence. Students have the option of taking 3 credits of Internship and completing the 600 hour requirement in one semester. Or, a student may take 2 con-secutive semesters of Internship at 3 credits each completing 300 hours of Internship each semester.

Students in the School Programs who elect the 6 credit option for Internship need to understand that this option precludes any elective course.

Guidelines

Selection of internship site.

• After consultation with the student, the Internship Supervisor will contact the administrator at the preferred site to obtain per-mission for a student to do his or her internship there and to request the assignment of a Supervising Counselor. The student will then visit the site to finalize arrangements.

• A Counselor-trainee who is currently employed in a counseling position in a school, college, or agency setting may complete her or his internship ‘on the job’, provided that all of the intern-ship requirements can be met.

• Arrangements are entirely subject to conditions established by administrators of the school, college, or agency.

Selection of clients.

• Clients are selected with the cooperation of the Administrator

Provisional Status

Students who fail to fully meet the requirements for admission to the Department may be accepted on Provisional Status. After completing their first 12 credits, Provisional Status students will be evaluated for Full Admission Status. Provisional Status students must maintain a 3.0 aver-age and must meet requirements specified at the time of their provisional admission to the department (e.g., completion of undergraduate prerequi-sites, specified courses in the Graduate Department). Students entering the Department on Provisional Status may be required to complete spe-cific courses as part of the 12 credits of their candidacy review.

Admission in Process

The category "Admissions in Process" is reserved for students who are applying to the Department and have not fully completed the applica-tion. Students may take up to six credits during this period. No student will be permitted to enroll in the Department after taking six credits unless their formal application is completed. Enrollment for up to six credits during "Admissions in Process" is taken at the student's own risk and does not imply acceptance into the program. During their status as “Admission in Process”, students are limited to the following entry-level courses: Counseling 504, 505, 582, 586, Psychology 503, 506, 507, 514, 517, 518, 521, 523, 531, 561. Admission to advanced-level courses is available only after full admission into the program.

Enrichment

Students may take up to six credits on an enrichment basis without matriculating in the Department. Only certain courses can be taken for Enrichment purposes. Permission of the Department Chair is required to complete any courses not on the list of entry-level courses described above for “Admission in Process” students.

Transfer Courses

Some students in the Department have completed graduate credits in other programs at Marywood or at other institutions. Students are al-lowed to apply a maximum of 15 transfer credits to their Master’s De-gree, provided that these credits are in courses that are comparable with those offered in the Department. Transfer credits count toward the total

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number of graduate credits for each of the degree programs in which stu-dents have been accepted. Stustu-dents who wish to request a transfer of graduate credits into the Department must:

1. Have attained Full Acceptance Status in the Department. 2. Provide a syllabus of the proposed transfer course.

3. Provide an official transcript showing that the student earned a grade of “B” level or above in the course(s) to be transferred. Grades lower than “B” are not transferable.

4. Meet with their Advisor who will make a recommendation of approval of transfer.

5. Final written approval is made by the Department Chair with copies of the final determination placed in the student's file and mailed to the student.

After matriculation in the Department, students may, with the ap-proval of their Advisor, complete courses at another institution or in an-other academic department at Marywood where these courses are consis-tent with their plan of study at Marywood. Students should meet with their Advisor during the semester prior to taking a course at another insti-tution. Catalog descriptions of such courses will need to be provided to the advisor for review along with information about the College or Uni-versity program. Upon review of course descriptions the advisor will recommend whether the course should be considered for inclusion in the student’s plan of study. This recommendation will be reviewed by the Department Chair who will determine final approval. Once the course has been completed, students should complete steps 2-5 in the above sec-tion on "Transfer of Courses" for final approval. Students must carefully follow these procedures to insure that courses taken at another institution or in another department can be transferred to their plan of study in the Department.

Department Policies

Admission to the Department

Persons applying to the graduate programs in Psychology and Coun-seling must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and have demonstrated potential for graduate work ordinarily by having maintained at least a “B” average in undergraduate study.

Health Counseling students. Review the settings and identify those that may interest you. You may select more than one at this point, because you may not have made a clear decision. As you proceed through the program, you will become clearer about a particular area of interest. If you have not decided yet, that is understandable, but you should have some clear idea as you approach Practicum.

1. In-Patient Psychiatric (Adolescents, Adults)

2. Partial Hospitalization Program (Adolescents, Adults) 3. Out-patient and Mental Health Agency

4. Corrections/Family Court 5. Family Services Agency (Private) 6. Substance Abuse Treatment (In-Patient) 7. Substance Abuse Treatment (Out-Patient) 8. Domestic Violence Shelter/Treatment 9. Child Protective Services Agency 10. State of Private Youth Diagnostic Center 11. Hospice

12. HIV Counseling 13. Services for the Elderly

14. State of Private Prevention Program 15. Working with the Unemployed

Student's current place of employment

Students may choose to do their Practicum and Internship field ex-perience where they work provided they meet the following criteria:

1. The Agency or Institution provides counseling services.

2. This setting must provide services that will enable the student to satisfy all the requirements for Practicum and Internship that are stated in the Student Handbook as well as the Practicum and Internship packet of material.

3. The student must select another Master Degree individual with at least 3 years supervisory experience to act as the Practicum or Internship supervisor. (Please note: The student’s regular super-visor at their employment site cannot serve in this role because of ethical guidelines pertaining to dual relationships.)

Remember it is important that the supervisor for this experience meet all the stated requirements. These individuals can be Counselors, Social Workers, Psychologists, School Psychologists and Psychiatrists.

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**Specific Guidelines for an internship can be found in the Student Handbook of Graduate Programs in Psychology and Counseling and by consulting with your advisor.

Objectives

The internship experience will allow students to:

a. engage in realistic counseling and related on-the-job experiences under supervision.

b. develop skill in the use of techniques and procedures appropri-ate to one’s philosophy of counseling.

c. demonstrate awareness of the relationship of theory to practice. d. gain knowledge of referral agencies and resources appropriate to

the internship site.

e. demonstrate an ethical and professional attitude toward the prac-tice of counseling.

f. develop professional relationships with staff members in the work setting.

g. obtain feedback concerning one’s behavior as a counselor.

Strategies

The internship student’s supervisor will make all prior arrangements for the internship and will submit a written contract to the on-site Admin-istrator at least one month prior to the internship experience. This con-tract between the University and the training facility, covering the actual time span of the experience and appropriate legal issues, must be signed by both parties before the internship starts. The Internship Supervisor will meet with the interns as a group periodically throughout the intern-ship and with individual interns as often as deemed necessary. The Su-pervising Counselor will be responsible, with the approval of the Admin-istrator, for providing opportunities for the intern to engage in a variety of appropriate counseling activities under supervision, and will evaluate the intern’s performance.

Requirements

Practicum and Internship Settings

The following represent Practicum and Internship settings for Mental

While a concentration in Psychology is not required, students must have taken undergraduate courses in Introductory Psychology, Statistics, and Human Development prior to enrollment in the Department (or as part of the requirements for advancement to candidacy in the Department).

The graduate programs in Psychology and Counseling admit stu-dents on either Full or Provisional Status. This designation is determined by the credentials reviewed at the time of the admissions process. These credentials may include overall undergraduate QPA, undergraduate Psy-chology QPA, GRE or MAT scores, letters of recommendation, writing sample, and work experience.

All students who study in the graduate programs in the Psychology and Counseling Department, degree candidate or otherwise, are expected to provide appropriate credentials in support of their graduate status. Thus, those who desire courses for enrichment or other personal enroll-ment on an ad hoc basis for one semester must submit appropriate cre-dential materials, including application materials and transcripts.

Students should consult the current catalog concerning application procedures for both degree and certification programs. Information with regard to scholarship and graduate assistantship programs is also pre-sented in the catalog. Application forms for scholarship and assistantship programs are available from the CEHD Dean's Office.

Full Admission Status and Probationary Status

Students are admitted to Full Acceptance Status by having met the General Requirements of the College of Education and Human Develop-ment (CEHD) as well as the requireDevelop-ments of the DepartDevelop-ment. DepartDevelop-ment requirements for admission include:

• Undergraduate QPA of at least 3.0 • GRE or MAT scores at least at the 50%ile

• Letters of recommendation that provide evidence of suitability for study in Psychology and Counseling

Full Acceptance Status is contingent upon the student maintaining a quality point average of 3.0 in graduate Psychology and Counseling courses. A student whose QPA falls below 3.0 at any point in their pro-gram of study will be placed on Probation. Students on Probation Status have one semester to bring their QPA up to 3.0. Failure to do so will

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re-sult in dismissal from the Department. Note that some program tracks in the Department require a grade of “B” or better in particular courses (see RCEHD Catalog for details).

Provisional Status

Students who fail to fully meet the requirements for admission to the Department may be accepted on Provisional Status. After completing their first 12 credits, Provisional Status students will be evaluated for Full Admission Status. Provisional Status students must maintain a 3.0 aver-age and must meet requirements specified at the time of their provisional admission to the department (e.g., completion of undergraduate prerequi-sites, specified courses in the Graduate Department). Students entering the Department on Provisional Status may be required to complete spe-cific courses as part of the 12 credits of their candidacy review.

Admission in Process

The category "Admissions in Process" is reserved for students who are applying to the Department and have not fully completed the applica-tion. Students may take up to six credits during this period. No student will be permitted to enroll in the Department after taking six credits unless their formal application is completed. Enrollment for up to six credits during "Admissions in Process" is taken at the student's own risk and does not imply acceptance into the program. During their status as “Admission in Process”, students are limited to the following entry-level courses: Counseling 504, 505, 582, 586, Psychology 503, 506, 507, 514, 517, 518, 521, 523, 531, 561. Admission to advanced-level courses is available only after full admission into the program.

the on campus group supervision.

Secondary School Counseling

Students must complete 600 hours of internship. The credit require-ment for this experience is three (3) credits. Students have the following options:

• Students can complete their internship requirements on a part-time basis. Students will be involved in fieldwork over the course of two (2) consecutive semesters, i.e., Fall, Spring or Spring, Fall. During each semester that the student is registered for internship, he/she must complete a minimum of 300 hours of field site experience and attend group supervision on campus. Students must register for 1.5 credits of internship each semes-ter. That is, COUN 552A - 1.5 credits; COUN 552B - 1.5 cred-its, for a total of three (3) credits.

• Students can also elect the option of completing their internship on a full-time basis. A full-time student will register for COUN 552C for three (3) credits and complete a minimum of 600 hours of field site experiences in one semester. In addition, the student must attend the on campus group supervision.

Elementary School Counseling

Students must complete 600 hours of internship. The credit require-ment for this experience is three (3) credits. Students have the following options:

• Students can complete their internship requirements on a part-time basis. Students will be involved in fieldwork over the course of two (2) consecutive semesters, i.e., Fall, Spring or , Spring, Fall. During each semester that the student is registered for internship, he/she must complete a minimum of 300 hours of field site experience and attend group supervision on campus. Students must register for 1.5 credits of internship each semes-ter. That is, COUN 524A - 1.5 credits; COUN 524B - 1.5 cred-its, for a total of three (3) credits.

• Students can also elect the option of completing their internship on a full-time basis. A full-time student will register for COUN 524C for three (3) credits and complete a minimum of 600 hours of field site experiences in one semester. In addition, the student must attend the on campus group supervision.

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Finding a Placement

The same guidelines for practicum are used in finding a placement for an internship.

Time Guidelines

The program requires students to complete a supervised internship of 600 (School Counselors) or 900 (Mental Health Counselors) hours that is begun after successful completion of the student's practicum. The stu-dent's internship includes the following:

• A minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clients.

• A minimum of 1 hour per week of individual supervision, throughout the internship, usually performed by the agency su-pervisor.

• Group supervision (2 hours per week) throughout the internship, usually performed by the faculty supervisor.

Mental Health Counseling

Students muse complete 900 hours of internship. The credit require-ment for this experience is six (6) credits. Students have the following options:

• Students can complete their internship requirements on a part-time basis. Students will be involved in fieldwork over the course of three (3) consecutive semesters, i.e., Summer, Fall, Spring or any similar combination. During each semester that the student is registered for internship, he/she must complete a minimum of 300 hours of field site experience and attends group supervision on campus. Students must register for two credits of internship each semester. That is, COUN 553A - 2 credits; COUN 553B - 2 credits; and COUN 553C - 2 credits, for a total of six (6) credits.

• Students can also elect to do their fieldwork on a combination of part-time-full-time basis over the course of two consecutive semesters. For example, a full-time student will register for COUN 553A - 2 credits during the summer session and must complete a minimum of 300 hours of field site experiences. In the Fall, the student will register for COUN 553D Internship - 4 credits and complete a minimum of 600 hours of field experi-ences. In addition to the hours in the field, a student must attend

Enrichment

Students may take up to six credits on an enrichment basis without matriculating in the Department. Only certain courses can be taken for Enrichment purposes. Permission of the Department Chair is required to complete any courses not on the list of entry-level courses described above for “Admission in Process” students.

Transfer Courses

Some students in the Department have completed graduate credits in other programs at Marywood or at other institutions. Students are al-lowed to apply a maximum of 15 transfer credits to their Master’s De-gree, provided that these credits are in courses that are comparable with those offered in the Department. Transfer credits count toward the total number of graduate credits for each of the degree programs in which stu-dents have been accepted. Stustu-dents who wish to request a transfer of graduate credits into the Department must:

1. Have attained Full Acceptance Status in the Department. 2. Provide a syllabus of the proposed transfer course.

3. Provide an official transcript showing that the student earned a grade of “B” level or above in the course(s) to be transferred. Grades lower than “B” are not transferable.

4. Meet with their Advisor who will make a recommendation of approval of transfer.

5. Final written approval is made by the Department Chair with copies of the final determination placed in the student's file and mailed to the student.

After matriculation in the Department, students may, with the ap-proval of their Advisor, complete courses at another institution or in an-other academic department at Marywood where these courses are consis-tent with their plan of study at Marywood. Students should meet with their Advisor during the semester prior to taking a course at another insti-tution. Catalog descriptions of such courses will need to be provided to the advisor for review along with information about the College or Uni-versity program. Upon review of course descriptions the advisor will recommend whether the course should be considered for inclusion in the student’s plan of study. This recommendation will be reviewed by the Department Chair who will determine final approval. Once the course

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has been completed, students should complete steps 2-5 in the above sec-tion on "Transfer of Courses" for final approval. Students must carefully follow these procedures to insure that courses taken at another institution or in another department can be transferred to their plan of study in the Department.

Registration Advisement

All students receive program and course advisement from their Ad-visor or the Department Chair. Newly-admitted students are advised to consult with their Advisor or the Chairperson in advance of the actual registration date for the term in which they plan to begin study. Note that open registration dates are intended for those students who are beginning their graduate study. Issues involving transfer of credit and individual program requirements should be determined as early as possible.

Students currently enrolled in any given semester are expected to register in advance for the following semester. Students who need con-sultation regarding their program needs should arrange for an appoint-ment with their Advisor. If the student has already discussed a plan of study with the Advisor, the student may either leave forms with the De-partment Secretary for the Advisor to review, or request that their advisor release them for online registration. If using standard forms, the student is responsible for picking up these forms and submitting them to the Reg-istrar's Office for processing. The dates provided for advance registration are listed in the University Calendar. The date a form is received at the Academic Records Office is the official date of receipt. Many courses in the Department fill to capacity early and students are advised to submit registration forms as soon as possible during the Advisement period in order to obtain admission to courses.

All registration forms must be reviewed and signed by the student’s Advisor. Students are not permitted to register for classes unless the course or courses have been approved by the student’s Advisor or De-partment Chair. Exceptions are not permitted.

According to University policy, places in class cannot be reserved for students who submit payment after a prescribed date. That date is usually just prior to the Open Registration period and is announced in written materials distributed by the Registrar’s Office.

• The remainder of the 100 hours on site will be spent in other activities appropriate to the setting.

After Practicum

• Have your site supervisor complete the Practicum Completion Form and the Final Student Counselor Evaluation Form and return both to the instructor by mail. It is the responsibility of the student to see that this is accomplished in a timely manner. • You are required to submit the Site Evaluation Form and the

Faculty Supervisor Evaluation Form at the conclusion of your 100 hours.

**All forms may be obtained from the faculty instructor.

Internship

Description

The internship experience for the counseling student is housed in a pre-approved appropriate work setting. In consultation with the Counsel-ing Internship Faculty Supervisor, students choose settCounsel-ings that are com-patible with their career goals and training experience. Identification of an appropriate on-campus supervisor for a particular internship site is negotiated with the Advisor and Chairperson. Students are expected to become familiar with the internship site, its operation, systems and or-ganization, as well as its therapeutic regimens and population served. This experience follows the formal educational and preparation program. It is at this point that practicum, field experiences, and the whole prepara-tion program come together and the intern is given the freedom and inde-pendence to demonstrate acquired competencies in a real counseling situation. The internship includes activities that a regularly employed staff member would be expected to perform.

Each intern must be covered by an agreement signed by the Presi-dent of the University, an authorized Administrator of the internship site, the Counseling Internship Faculty Supervisor, and the student.

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• The site must be approved by the instructor.

• Employs a site supervisor who holds at least a masters degree in counseling or related field and has a minimum of three (3) years relevant professional experience.

• Has a site supervisor who agrees to provide at least one (1) hour of direct, individual supervision per week.

• Please note that a student may not register for Applied Practice II (COUN 523 or COUN 545) until a field site and university approval are obtained.

• Complete a Site Registration Form and submit it to the course instructor prior to the beginning of work on-site. No hours accu-mulated at the site can be counted until the Site Registration Form is completed and accepted by the instructor.

• Discuss the role of the supervisor with the site supervisor along with the Letter of Introduction and Explanation when obtaining your placement.

Practicum Time Commitment

• A minimum of one hundred (100) clock hours of on-site super-vised experience will be required during a semester for all coun-seling students.

• Forty (40) of these hours are to be in direct service contact (i.e.; individual clients, group clients, classroom guidance activities). • Eight (8) of these direct contact hours are to come from

long-term counseling relationships with two (2) clients for the pur-pose of on campus group and individual supervision sessions. The student is to see each client for eight (8) weekly appoint-ments of at least 30 minutes.

• Students are expected to spend at least nine (9) hours per week at their practicum site. Of this time:

o 2.25 hours should be spent in individual counseling

o 2.25 hours should be spent in group counseling (and/or in the case of school counselors, classroom guidance activi-ties).

• All students are required to have:

o At least one (1) hour per week of individual supervision by the site supervisor.

o At least one (1) hour per week of individual supervision by the faculty supervisor.

o Two (2) hours of group supervision per week.

Professional Conduct

The graduate Counseling program requires students to conduct them-selves as professionals-in-training. As such, students are expected to act in a manner that displays the highest regard for human dignity. Students are also expected to demonstrate personal qualities that are required for counselors, as appropriate for their program specialization (e.g., ability to listen empathetically and accurately, ability to engage effectively with a wide diversity of clients in testing and/or counseling settings, ability to work in an effective manner with other research, medical, legal, educa-tional, and mental health professionals). This professional behavior is expected both in the classroom and other relevant professional settings (e.g., when conducting research, during practicum or internship); formal written evaluations by practicum and internship supervisors will help to document this professional standing. Any student found lacking in pro-fessional conduct may be placed on probation and given one semester to rectify the issues anticipated in a written Corrective Action Plan. If the Department believes the situation has been rectified during a probation-ary period, the student will be allowed to continue in his or her program. If the situation is not rectified, the student will be dismissed. At all times, counseling students are required to adhere to the ethical code of the American Counseling Association. Copies of these ethical codes are rou-tinely available in the Campus Book Shop and should be purchased by students early in their training. They are also available for download as a .pdf file via the internet at www.counseling.org under “resources.”

Any student found to not be following the requirements for profes-sional conduct noted above may be subject to dismissal from the program regardless of their status. Students will be informed in writing of any serious concerns about their behavior in terms of professional conduct. Students will be given the opportunity to meet with a panel of faculty in the Department in order to attempt an informal resolution of any such concerns. Failure to resolve these concerns informally may lead to a full Departmental review, Probationary status, a Corrective Action Plan, and possible dismissal. Students may appeal any Department decisions fol-lowing the grievance procedures of the Reap College of Education and Human Development (RCEHD). Information about appeals procedures for the RCEHD are available from the Dean’s Office of the RCEHD.

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Candidacy

Students should apply for candidacy after 12 credits and/or comple-tion of admission requirements. Applicacomple-tion forms can be obtained from the department secretary or from your advisor. Requirements are as fol-lows:

1. Fulfill any and all Admissions Committee requirements.

2. Complete twelve credits at Marywood with a grade of "B" or better.

3. Have taken one of the following:

a. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) b. Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

c. Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)

4. Submit a career goal statement along with the Application for Admission to Candidacy for a Master's Degree to the Depart-ment Chairperson. This application can be obtained through the department secretary. The goal statement should reflect your goals and objectives upon completion of the program. You

should also complete a list of projected courses planned for the completion of the program, including anticipated dates of courses and projected completion date.** This will comprise

your official learning agreement.

5. Receive departmental approval of a planned 48 or 60 credit pro-gram.

6. Submit Child Abuse Clearance, Criminal Background Check, and FBI Clearance.

**Degree requirements include a practicum, internship and final compre-hensive examination.

Comprehensive Examination

All of the graduate degree programs in Counseling require success-ful completion of a Comprehensive Examination. The purpose of this exam is to show that the student has mastered significant components of the curriculum in an integrative manner.

A Comprehensive Examination is required for completion of the Counseling Program. The purposes of this examination are two fold: 1) To demonstrate a student’s comprehension knowledge in the Master’s

Secondary/Mental Health)

6. Counseling 524/552/553. Supervised Internship (Elem./Sec./ Mental Health)

Certain courses (Counseling 523, 544, 545) are not available during summer sessions. Internships (except for the M.A. in Mental Health Counseling) are not available during summer sessions. Full-time students should anticipate a minimum of five academic semesters to complete a degree in Counseling. Completion of summer school classes may allow a lighter course load during Fall and Spring semesters; however, complet-ing summer classes will not allow completion of the program in less than five regular academic semesters (Fall and Spring). Admission to Coun-seling 523, 524, and 545 require permission of (1) the Advisor or course Instructor and (2) the Department Chair.

Practicum and Internship

The program considers the supervised field experiences of Practicum and Internship to be the most important component of the student’s pro-fessional preparation. These laboratory and field experiences are de-signed sequentially to integrate knowledge and skills from earlier work and to follow for the development of new skills. In addition, the experi-ences serve as a vehicle for communication and networking (i.e. serving as an important means of linking the student, the program, and field-based professionals in dialogue, feedback and development of mutual interests). The importance of practicum and field placement cannot be over-stressed. Therefore, we emphasize that you become familiar with the requirements and follow them exactly as specified. Further informa-tion regarding Practicum and Internship appears elsewhere in this hand-book.

Finding a Practicum Placement

• The student is responsible for selecting and formalizing their field site. The site must be appropriate to your skill level and specialization.

• Students should confer with their advisor early in the semester in which they are enrolled in Counseling Techniques (COUN 544) to discuss their placement.

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Endorsement Policy

The faculty of the Counseling programs limits its endorsement to those students who have completed one of the three CACREP - ap-proved programs. Students will be endorsed only for the programs they have successfully completed.

Degree Programs

This section describes unique features of the different programs in the Department. The Graduate Catalog lists and describes specific course requirements in each program area.

Master of Science in Counselor Education

(with specialization in Elementary or Secondary School Counseling). 48 credit program.

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling

(with specialization in Addiction Counseling, Agency Counseling, or Pastoral Counseling). 60 credit program.

These programs are designed to provide students with personal and professional skills in the areas of individual and group counseling, con-sultation, educational planning, and career development. Completion of the Master of Science in Counselor Education degree programs meets the certification requirements of the Pennsylvania Department of Education for Educational Specialist I in Elementary or Secondary School Counsel-ing.

Sequencing is critical for several courses required in both the M.S. and M.A. programs. All students must take the following courses in or-der:

1. Counseling 504. Philosophical Foundations of Counseling and Psychotherapy

2. Counseling 525. Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy 3. Counseling 518. Applied Practice I

4. Counseling 544. Counseling Techniques

5. Counseling 523/545. Applied Practice II (Elementary/

Program, and (2) To act as a preparation exam for the National Counsel-ors Examination (NCE). Passing standards and format for this examina-tion may be discussed with your faculty advisor.

It is the student's obligation to notify the Chairperson in writing of her or his intent to take the comprehensive examination. Examination dates are listed in the University calendar. Generally, exams are given three times a year: in the fall, spring, and summer sessions. Written noti-fication of intent to take the exams must be made at least one month be-fore the exams are offered.

All CACREP students are required to take a Comprehensive Exami-nation. The examination consists of two main parts. Part 1, which will be scored by the CPCE and Part 2, which will be scored by a Rubric devel-oped by the Department. Students who fail the exam may take the test a second time. In no case can the student take the exam more than twice.

Part 1 is the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE). The purpose of the CPCE is to assess counseling students' knowledge of counseling information viewed as important by CACREP accredited programs. The CPCE also provides collective feedback that can be used by programs in developing/adapting curriculum.

Exam Content:

The CPCE covers the eight Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) common-core areas as defined by their Standards for Preparation:

1. Human Growth and Development - studies that provide an un-derstanding of the nature and needs of individuals at all devel-opmental levels.

2. Social and Cultural Foundations - studies that provide an under-standing of issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse soci-ety.

3. Helping Relationships - studies that provide an understanding of counseling and consultation processes.

4. Group Work - studies that provide an understanding of group development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group work approaches.

5. Career and Lifestyle Development - studies that provide an un-derstanding of career development and related life factors. 6. Appraisal - studies that provide an understanding of individual

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and group approaches to assessment and evaluation.

7. Research and Program Evaluation - studies that provide an un-derstanding of types of research methods, basic statistics, and ethical and legal considerations in research.

8. Professional Orientation and Ethics - studies that provide an understanding of all aspects of professional functioning includ-ing history, roles, organizational structures, ethics, standards, and credentialing.

These eight core areas, which constitute the CPCE, serve as the pri-mary theoretical basis for the examination. It is through these areas that the CPCE is associated with accepted professional standards.

Part 2 of the examination requires the student to analyze a counsel-ing case.

Case Conceptualization and Analysis

Each student will be given a case study to analyze according to his or her specialization (Mental Health, or Elementary/Secondary School Counseling). Issues to consider in your case conceptualization include:

• Ethics

• Identification of the problem issues

• Conceptual framework for addressing the issues

• Practical application of counseling techniques, if indicated

Internship Experience

This internship is required in all Counseling programs. Details re-garding the process of meeting internship requirements are presented later in this handbook.

Registration for Graduation

It is necessary to complete a Registration Form for graduation at the time of enrollment for the last semester of study for the Master’s degree. To do this, include the following specification when completing the Reg-istration Form:

DEAN 057(01) GR DEG CAND/EHD 0 credits

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fund.

In situations that are not so easily identified and/or resolved, the student is advised that he/she must develop and comply with a corrective action plan that is acceptable to the faculty. Usually the corrective action plan is developed at the time of the student/s faculty meeting. However, if the corrective action plan is not able to be developed and agreed upon, the student is given one week to submit the Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

This student-faculty meeting and subsequent CAP is considered a Verbal Warning to the student.

Once the CAP is agreed upon, the student is monitored for a maximum of one semester.

Failure to develop and/or comply with the CAP will result in a formal hearing.

The formal hearing is reserved for failure to develop and/or comply with a CAP or serious ethical and/or professional misconduct issues. When either arises the student is notified that he/she must meet with the entire counseling faculty. At this meeting, the student is apprised of the concern(s). It is hoped that the concerns presented to the student can be amicably resolved. However, there are those situations wherein the faculty can recommend to the Dean of College of Education and Hu-man Development that they be immediately dismissed from the program.

In those situations wherein moderate concerns exist, a formal CAP must be developed. Typically the CAP is developed by the student and faculty at the formal hearing. If for some reason this is not possible, the student must submit a CAP to the faculty within one week of the hearing. The faculty must then approve the CAP. If the CAP lacks clarity and/or behavioral objectives, it is in returned to the student for revision within one week. A CAP must be agreed upon and signed by the student and faculty within three weeks of the formal hearing.

The faculty can recommend to the Dean of the College of Edu-cation and Human Development immediate dismissal from the program for the following reasons:

1. Serious concerns of unprofessional and/or ethical conduct. 2. Substandard academic performance i.e. below 3.0 at candidacy 3. Failure to develop a CAP within a timely fashion (3weeks

maxi-mum)

4. failure to comply with a CAP

5. failure to produce child abuse clearances, criminal justice clear-ances (state police and/or FBI clearclear-ances

6. Producing false documentation of Applied II and internship hours

7. any other issues of serious matter already noted within the

stu-Certification for School Counselors

To become an educational specialist in Pennsylvania (in this case, a School Counselor), you must be certified by the PA Dept of Edu-cation (PDE). This requires the completion of a state-approved training program including student teaching or an internship, passing scores on Praxis I and II tests (Registration is accomplished at www.ets.org/praxis), and background checks. And, of course, candidates must apply with the required fee. At the time of this writing, the current fee is $40 for Mary-wood graduates.

In general, the best place to start is the certification office in McGowan. The phone number is: 570-961-4731. Otherwise, your best source of more detailed information is Pennsylvania Department of Edu-cation's web site: www.teaching.state.pa.us

Pennsylvania Licensure for Mental Health Counselors

Licensure requirements for the commonwealth of Pennsylvania are as follows:

• Passing score on the National Counseling Exam. • 60 graduate credits in Counseling.

• 3600 of documented experience, supervised by another Li-censed Professional Counselor, or other liLi-censed professional (i.e., clinical psychologist, etc.). Note: At the time of this writ-ing, 300 hours of internship can be applied to this total.

• A complete application packet, submitted to the “State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and family Therapists and Profes-sional Counselors” at P.O. Box 2649, Harrisburg, PA 17105-2649

For more detailed information, please visit: http:// www.dos.state.pa.us/bpoa/cwp

Retention Policy for Students in the Counseling Pro-grams

The Counseling Program faculty take a serious view of the supervi-sion of student professupervi-sional development. Completion of this program equips students to become professional counselors. Our concern for the quality of the students enrolled in our graduate program who may eventu-ally enter the counseling profession may at times lead us to question the

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ability of specific students to function at a satisfactory professional level. The Ethical Standards of the American Counseling Association (2005, Section F.5.b & F.6.a) state:

“Counselor educators who are responsible for developing, implementing, and supervising educational programs are skilled as teachers and practitioners. They are knowledgeable regarding the ethical, legal, and regulatory aspects of the pro-fession, are skilled in applying that knowledge, and make students and supervi-sees aware of their responsibilities.

“Through ongoing evaluation and appraisal, supervisors are aware of the

limita-tions of supervisees that

might impede performance. Supervisors assist supervisees in securing remedial assistance when needed. They

recommend dismissal from training programs, applied counseling settings, or state or voluntary professional

credentialing processes when those supervisees are unable to provide competent professional services. Supervisors seek consultation and docu-ment their decisions to dismiss or refer supervisees for assistance. They ensure that supervisees are aware of options available to them.”

As noted by Stadler (1994, October, p. 150) in an editorial “Why Be Ethical?” in the American Mental Health Counselors Association

Jour-nal:

Unethical conduct reflects poorly on the counseling profession, its related associations, and on us as members of the profession. Obviously it is not conducive to the development of the profession to condone or overlook such problems.

Part of the retention policy also includes individual evaluations of students by faculty, according to the following dimensions:

1. Academic performance. Each student is expected to maintain at least a 3.0 (B) grade point average. Students whose grade point average falls below a 3.0 (B) grade point average are given one academic semester to raise their GPA to 3.0

2. Interpersonal skills. Each student is expected to demonstrate effective interpersonal skills considered necessary to the coun-seling field. These skills include the ability to a) function effec-tively with fellow students and faculty, b) be open and adaptable in relating with many different kinds of people, c) demonstrate

self-awareness by an openness to self-examination and a com-mitment to personal and professional growth and development, and d) cope with the stressors presented by the expectations of all academic requirements as well as the outside stressors such as jobs and family situations.

3. Ethical behavior. Each student is expected to adhere to ACA’s Code of Ethics. We will expect students to conduct themselves in a professional manner at all times with faculty, fellow stu-dents, and university staff.

The forms used for this purpose are available for review in the Graduate office of Counseling & Psychology, and a more detailed procedure for evaluating students is as follows

Procedure for the Evaluation of Student Fitness for the Profession of Counseling

Counseling Program Faculty have program specific meetings a minimum of twice per semester. The first item on the agenda is student concerns. Any and all faculty may raise a concern regarding a particular student whom they are advising and/or instructing. A discussion then ensues to ascertain if in is an individual faculty concern or if other faculty has similar concerns. Student concerns can range from difficulty with writing assignments, poor academic performance, and unwillingness to participate in class discussions to unprofessional conduct and/or ethical violations.

If the student concern identified is shared by only one faculty member, the advisor or instructor is directed to informally meet with the student to rectify the concern. The student is then monitored by program faculty to insure that the concern is rectified.

If the identified student concern(s) is shared by two or more faculty, the individual advisor and the program chair together meet with the student to notify the student about the issue and to attempt to rectify the situation(s).

An example of this occurred three semesters ago when several faculty became concerned about a student appearing to fall asleep in class. After meeting with the student, it became apparent that the student was attempting to carry nine credits, while simultaneously trying to man-age a serious family crisis. Since it was past the refund/withdrawal pe-riod, the chair sought the Dean’s assistance in resolving this situation, and the student was able to withdraw from his courses and receive a

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