Sentence Subject and Predicate Lesson 3

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Sentence

Subject

and Predicate

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Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Every sentence has a

subject

and

predicate

.

The subject tells

whom or what the sentence is about

.

For example;

The house, The red car, or

The great teacher

.

The predicate tells

what the subject is or does.

For example;

(The house)

is white

, (The red car)

is fast

, or (The great

teacher)

likes students

.

The house

is white.

The car

is blue.

The teacher

likes students

.

How can you identify the subject?

To identify the subject of the sentence, first find the verb. Then ask, "Who or what

(verb)?"

Subject = Ronnie

• Who was hit by a ball? She.

Subject = she

• What is in Europe? Spain.

Subject = Spain

• Who can't fly? Pigs and cows.

Subject = pigs and cows • What is fun? Traveling.

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Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Simple subject

The subject can be a single word:

She is home.

Or, it can be a KEY word and some additional words around it:

The nice old lady from across the street is home. That KEY word is called a simple subject.

In the above example the subject

is built around the noun

lady

. The

other words around it (the, nice,

old, from, across, the, street)

simply describe the noun "lady."

Examples (the subject is in bold, the simple subject is in bold and red):

The catis asleep.

Many goodpeople are leaving.

The best studentin the class only got a B+.

Sometimes the subject can be omitted if it is understood.

Leave

! (The subject in this sentence was omitted, since it is understood to be

"you":

You leave!)

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Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

A

compound subject

is a subject that is

made up of two or more simple

subjects, connected by conjunctions such as and, but, or.

Note that the simple subjects can have additional words describing them.

The important thing is that when you can find more than one simple

subject in the subject of a sentence

you have a compound subject.

Example 1 (the subjects are in bold, the simple subjects are in bold and underlined, and the compound subject is in bold and purple):

Bob knows what to do.

Danielknows what to do.

When we combine these two sentences we get:

Bob and Danielknow what to do. "Bob and Daniel" is a compound subject. How do we know it's a compound subject?

Well, it's because we have two simple subjects:

Bob, Daniel.

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Example 2 (the subjects are in bold, the simple subjects are in bold and underlined, and the compound subject is in bold and purple):

The fat cat is on the couch.

The small dog is on the couch.

When we combine these two sentences we get:

The fat cat and the small dog are on the couch. "The fat cat and the small dog" is a compound subject. How do we know it's a compound subject?

Well, it's because we have two simple subjects:

cat, dog.

Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Some more examples (the complete subjects are in bold, the simple subjects are in bold and underlined, and the compound subject is in bold and purple):

Mom and Dad visited us yesterday.

Jack and Bonnie are getting married next month.

My brother Kevin and my sister Jane are out of the country.

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The

predicate

always includes a verb.

("Predicate" is also a verb that means, "to state something.")

Lesson 1

Subject and Predicate

"

Joe

is a good boy."

The subject is Joe. Now, what about Joe?

He is a good boy. So "is a good boy" is a

predicate.

Examples (the subject is in bold):

• Ronnie finished his homework.

• She was hit by a ball.

• Spain is in Europe.

How can you identify the predicate?

To identify the predicate of the sentence, look for the statement about the subject. For example, let's look at the sentence "John went home."

John is the subject. What is said about John? That he went home!

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Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Simple predicate

The predicate can be a single word: Jane left.

Or, it can be a KEY word and some additional words around it: Jane left the house.

That KEY word is called a simple predicate.

In the above example the predicate is built

around the verb

left

. The other words

around it (the, house) simply describe the

verb "left."

Examples (the predicate is in bold, the simple predicate is in bold and red):

The cat is asleep.

Many people found this book helpful.

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Compound predicate

Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

A compound predicate is a predicate that is made up of two or more simple predicates, connected by conjunctions such as and, but, or.

Note that the simple predicates can have additional words describing them.

The important thing is that when you find more than one simple predicate in the predicate of a sentence – you have a compound predicate.

Example 1 (the predicates are in bold, the simple predicates are in bold and underlined, and the compound predicate is in bold and purple):

Sarah baked some cookies. Sarah made some coffee.

When we combine these two sentences we get:

Sarah baked some cookies and made some coffee.

"Baked some cookies and made some coffee" is a compound predicate. How do we know it's a compound predicate?

Well, it's because we have two simple predicates:

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Example 2 (the predicates are in bold, the simple predicates are in bold and underlined, and the compound predicate is in bold and purple):

George will choose the color. George will paint the wall.

When we combine these two sentences we get:

George will choose the color and paint the wall.

"Will choose the color and paint the wall" is a compound predicate. How do we know it's a compound predicate?

Well, it's because we have two simple predicates:

will choose, paint.

Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Some more examples (the complete predicates are in bold, the simple

predicates are in bold and underlined, and the compound predicate is in bold and purple):

• Martin lives in Italy and works in a school.

• She knew the truth but refused to talk about it.

• They waited for a while and then returned home.

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Simple Subject and Predicate

Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

1) Daniel can come with us to the movie. 2) Li is my best friend.

3) The moon is shining bright. 4) Cassia is writing a letter.

5) Dinner will be ready in fifteen minutes. 6) The firemen are extinguishing the fire.

7) We went to lunch with Amar and his friend today. 8) Juan and Julian worked so hard on their project.

9) A large number of swimmers competed in the race this year. 10) The tired old man came in from the rain.

11) People really need to stop littering. 12) I am very hungry.

13) Oh my gosh, I forgot my homework!

14) 14) This beautiful 15th century painting is priceless. 15) The wild bunny hopped across the road.

16) The bird’s feathers were long and colorful.

Directions: Identify the complete subject and predicate in the following sentences.

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Compound Subject and Predicate

Lesson 2

Subject and Predicate

Directions: Indicate whether the sentence has a compound subject or a compound predicate.

1. Jim and Ruth climb rock walls.

compound subject compound predicate

2. Mr. Scott writes and draws on the computer program. compound subject compound predicate

3. Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse were the creation of Walt Disney. compound subject compound predicate

4. Our planet revolves around the sun and rotates on its axis. compound subject compound predicate

5. The A minor chord and the C minor chord sound different. compound subject compound predicate

6. Dolphins and porpoises have highly developed reasoning abilities. compound subject compound predicate

7. John Lennon wrote and performed the song "Imagine". compound subject compound predicate

8. Asians and Hispanics are minorities in the United States. compound subject compound predicate

9. Maya Angelou writes poetry and has appeared on many TV shows. compound subject compound predicate

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