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Choices For Your Future Success!

P A S A D E N A C I T Y C O L L E G E

Career and Technical

Education Handbook

(2)

TECHNICAL EDUCATION

HANDBOOK

2009 ­ 2010

PASADENA AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

2009­2010

Dr. Jeanette Mann, President

Hilary Bradbury­Huang, Ph.D., Vice President Dr. Consuelo Rey Castro, Board Clerk Dr. Paulette J. Perfumo, Secretary/PCC President

Geoffrey L. Baum, Member William E. Thomson, Member

John H. Martin, Member Beth Wells­Miller, Member

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Table of Contents

President’s Message ...4

Message from the Office of Career and Technical Education……...5

Certificate of Achievement………...6

Requirements for the Certificate/ Associate in Science Degree………….. ...7

Occupational Skills Certificate…………...8

Accounting – Bookkeeping • Accounting Clerk ...10

• Accounting – Bookkeeping Assistant ...11

• Accounting – Bookkeeping………...12

• Cashier………...13

Administration of Justice……….. ...14

Archaeological Field Work………...15

Automotive Technology • All Automotive Systems...16

• Air Conditioning Technician ...17

• Electrical/Electronic Systems...18

• Engine Performance Technician ...19

• Powertrain Technician...20 • Undercar Technician ...21 • Underhood Technician ...22 Biological Technology...23 • Computational Biology ...24 • Laboratory Assistant...25

• Stem Cell Culture...26

• Laboratory Skills...27

Building Construction ...28

• Cabinetmaking and Millwork ...29

• Construction Law...30 Business Administration • Management...31 • Entrepreneurship ...32 • Financial Investment ...33 • International Business/Trade...34 • Retail Management ...35 • Marketing Merchandising ...36 • Customer Service ...37 • E­Commerce...38

Business Information Technology • Administrative Assistant...39

• Business Software Specialist ...40

• Data Entry Technician...41

• Executive Assistant ...42

• Office Applications Specialist I ...43

• Office Applications Specialist II ...43

• Office Assistant ...44

Child Development...45

• School Age Instructional Assistant ...49

• Special Education Assistant ...50

Computer Information Systems • Microcomputer Support ...52

• Operations ...53

• Programming ...54

• Small Computer Applications ...55

• E­Commerce...56

• CISCO Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Preparation ...57

• CISCO Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Preparation ...58

• Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Preparation (MCSE)...59

• Interactive Software Development...60

• Oracle Database Fundamentals...61

Construction Inspection...62

Cosmetology...63

• Instructional Techniques in Cosmetology...64

Culinary Arts ...65

• Baking and Pastry ...66

• Catering ...67

• Kitchen Assistant...68

Dental Assisting...69

Dental Hygiene...71

Dental Laboratory Technology...73

Digital Media • Computer Assisted Photo Imaging...75

• Graphic Design...76

• Interactive Multimedia Design...77

Electrical Technology...79

• Applied Circuits ...80

• Basic Photovoltaic Design and Installation ...81

Electronics Technology ...82

• Computer Technology ...83

• Basic Digital Technician ...84

• CISCO Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Preparation ...85

Emergency Medical Technician 1­A...86

Engineering Design Technology • CAD/CAM Technician...87

• CAD Modeling and Animation – Architecture/Engineering/Construction ...88

• CAD Designer – Architectural/Engineering/Construction ...89

• CAD Designer – Mechanical Design and Manufacturing...89

• CAD Technician – Architectural/Engineering/Construction ...90

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Fashion

• Design...91

• Fashion Assistant...92

• Custom Clothing ...93

• Fashion Marketing ...94

• Historical Costume Making ...95

Fire Technology...96

• Fire Academy Preparation...97

Graphic Communications Technology • Computer Imaging and Composition...98

• Screen Printing ...99

• Apparel Graphics and Printing...100

• Electronic Prepress...101

• Screen Printing for Small Business ...101

Hospitality Management ...102 Journalism • Photojournalism ...103 • Printed Media...104 • Public Relations ...105 Library Technology ...106

Machine Shop Technology...107

• Manufacturing Technology I...108

• Manufacturing Technology II ...109

Medical Assisting • Administrative/Clinical ...110

• Medical Office – Administrative...111

• Medical Office Insurance Biller...111

• Medical Office Receptionist ...112

• Medical Office Transcription ...112

Nursing ...113

• Registered...115

• Vocational...117

• Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered Nurse – Associate Degree...118

• Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered Nurse – 30 Unit Option ...119

• Certified Nursing Assistant ...120

Paralegal Studies ...121 Photography...123 • Cinema­Cinematography ...124 • Cinema Production/Filmmaking ...125 Product Design ...126 • Graphics ...127 • Technology ...128 Radiologic Technology...129

Speech­Language Pathology Assistant...131

Television and Radio • Broadcast Journalism ...132

• Television Operations...133

• Television Operations Technology...134

• Television Production...135

• Radio Production...136

• Broadcast Journalism ...137

• Media Programming and Management...138

• Radio Broadcast Operations...139

• Radio Production...140

• Television Production...141

• Television Post Production...142

• Video Operations...143

• Writing for Film, Television and Radio ...144

Theater Arts • Theater Technology...145

• Makeup Technology...146

Welding • Construction, Aero­Space and Pipe Welding ...147

• Construction Welding...148

• Gas Tungsten and Gas Metal Welding...149

• Basic Welding ...150

Community Education Center • Non­Credit Classes and Vocational Programs ...151

• High School Articulation with Occupational Curricula ...152

Directions to Pasadena City College/CEC...154

CEC Map...155

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Pasadena City College

President’s Message

It is my pleasure to join with the Office of Career and Technical Education in

sharing with you the Career and Technical Education Handbook for 2009­2010,

which presents the rich array of workforce preparation certificate programs offered

at Pasadena City College.

I am proud of the partnerships formed by the faculty and their advisory committee members that

enable us to provide instructional programs that allow our students to develop the skills sets needed

for success in a large number of industry sectors. We are very grateful to all of our industry and

business partners whose contributions help to make this book possible.

As you consider Pasadena City College as a place to learn new skills or to upgrade your existing

skills, we want you to know that we have made an institutional commitment to student success.

That means we will do everything we can to assist you in achieving you educational goals with the

highest quality of instruction and student services with the most efficient use of your valuable time.

Best wishes in your educational and career pursuits!

Dr. Paulette J. Perfumo

Superintendent/President

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Career and Technical Education

Using the Handbook

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide a listing of the many exceptional career

and technical education programs offered at Pasadena City College. These

programs offer training for a variety of careers.

The career and technical education programs are listed alphabetically in the Handbook. When you

find a program that you are interested in, you may wish to schedule a visit to the appropriate

division to learn more about it. A telephone number is provided for your convenience.

The listings under each program area include courses that are required to complete that program.

Some courses have prerequisites; you should consult the college catalog for more detailed

information on requirements, as well as for complete description of courses. Also included are

program descriptions complete with job titles and starting salaries per the:

• U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational

Outlook Handbook (OOH), 2008­2009

Edition www.bls.gov

• Employment Development Department

www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov

• CareerOneStop – Pathways to

Career Success

www.careerinfonet.org

• Federal Government Jobs

www.federalgovernmentjobs.us

• Job Star Central

www.jobstar.org

• Pasadena Area Community College

District, Instructional Support Services

Unit – Official Classified Monthly

Salary Schedule, July 1, 2007

www.pasadena.edu

A Schedule of Classes is produced each semester and should be used to locate courses that are

currently being offered, as well as up­to­date registration and student services information.

Admissions and enrollment information can be obtained by calling (626) 585­7395 or by visiting

the Admissions office in Building L, Room 113. For general information, call (626) 585­7123. For

information on the Website, use this address; http://www.pasadena.edu

If you successfully complete a career and technical education program at PCC, you can earn a

Certificate of Achievement (18 units or more), or an Occupational Skills Certificate (17 units or

less), continue your studies toward an Associate in Science degree, or transfer to a college or

university.

I urge you to use this Handbook to discover all of the career and technical education options

available for your future success.

Best Wishes,

Ellen Ligons

Associate Dean

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Certificate of Achievement

An occupational program is one whose primary goal is to prepare students for employment or an

upgrade of job skills. Students interested in developing advanced levels of proficiency in an occu­

pational area may pursue a Certificate of Achievement, which requires the completion of 18 units

or more. Pasadena City College currently offers more than 70 certificate programs in 37 different

subject areas. The programs and the requirements for successful completion are listed on subsequent

pages.

Upon completion of the specified curriculum for each occupational program area, students may

petition in the Division office for issuance of Certificates of Achievement or Occupational Skills

Certificates. Students should consult counseling services for information about specific require­

ments and/or any prerequisites.

OCCUPATIONAL CURRICULA

Accounting – Bookkeeping • Accounting Clerk

• Accounting – Bookkeeping Assistant • Accounting – Bookkeeping

Administration of Justice Automotive Technology

• All Automotive Systems • Air Conditioning Technician • Electrical/Electronics Systems • Engine Performance Technician • Powertrain Technician • Undercar Technician • Underhood Technician Biological Technology • Biological Technology • Computational Biology • Laboratory Assistant • Stem Cell Culture Building Construction Business Administration • Management • Entrepreneurship • Financial Investment • International Business/Trade • Retail Management • Marketing Merchandising Business Information Technology

• Administrative Assistant • Business Software Specialist • Data Entry Technician

• Small Computer Applications Construction Inspection

Cosmetology • Cosmetology

• Instructional Techniques in Cosmetology Culinary Arts

Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene

Dental Laboratory Technology Digital Media

• Computer Assisted Photo Imaging • Graphic Design

• Interactive Multimedia Design Electrical Technology

Electronics Technology • Electronics Technology • Computer Technology Engineering Design Technology

• CAD/CAM Technician Fashion

• Design

• Fashion Assistant Fire Technology

Graphic Communications Technology • Computer Imaging and Composition • Screen Printing Hospitality Management Journalism • Photojournalism • Printed Media • Public Relations

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• Vocational

• Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered Nurse – Associate Degree

• Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered Nurse – 30 Unit Option Paralegal Studies Photography Product Design • Product Design • Graphics • Technology Radiologic Technology • Television Operations

• Television Operations Technology • Television Production • Radio Production Theater Arts • Theater Technology • Makeup Technology Welding

• Construction, Aero­Space and Pipe Welding • Construction Welding

• Gas Tungsten and Gas Metal Welding

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT/

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE

Occupational programs have a primary goal of preparing students for employment or upgrading

of job skills. Students interested in developing advanced levels of proficiency in an occupational

area may pursue a Certificate of Achievement, which requires the completion of 18 units or more.

Pasadena City College currently offers more than 70 certificate programs in 37 different subject

areas.

Employer feedback suggests that strong academic skills are critical for success in today’s high­

performance workplace. It is, therefore, strongly recommended that students complete the

requirements for the Associate in Science Degree (see current college catalog) in addition to the

requirements for the occupational certificates.

Upon completion of the specified curriculum for each occupational program area, students may

petition in the Division office for issuance of Certificates of Achievement or Occupational Skills

Certificates. Students should consult counseling services for information about specific

requirements and/or any prerequisites.

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Occupational Skills Certificate

OTHER OCCUPATIONAL CURRICULA

Students, who want to develop job skills in a special area of occupational education in a short period of

time, can earn an Occupational Skills Certificate, which requires 17 units or less in one of the following

program areas:

Accounting­Bookkeeping • Cashier

Archaeological Field Work Biological Technology

• Laboratory Skills Building Construction

• Cabinetmaking and Millwork • Construction Law

Business Administration • Customer Service • E­Commerce

(Interdisciplinary Occupational Skills Certificate:

Business Administration, Computer Information Technology)

Business Information Technology • Executive Assistant

• Office Applications Specialist I • Office Applications Specialist II • Office Assistant

Child Development • Instructional Assistant

• Music and Movement Education for Young Children • School Age Instructional Assistant

• Special Education Assistant Computer Information Systems

• E­Commerce

(Interdisciplinary Occupational Skills Certificate:

Business Administration, Computer Information Technology)

• CISCO Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Preparation

(Interdisciplinary Occupational Skills Certificate:

Business & Computer Technology, Engineering & Technology)

• CISCO Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Preparation • Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Preparation (MCSE) • Interactive Software Development

• Oracle Database Fundamentals Culinary Arts

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• CISCO Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Preparation

(Interdisciplinary Occupational Skills Certificate:

Business & Computer Technology, Engineering & Technology)

Emergency Medical Technician 1­A Engineering Design Technology

• CAD Modeling and Animation – Architecture/Engineering/Construction • CAD Designer – Architectural/Engineering/Construction

• CAD Designer – Mechanical Design and Manufacturing • CAD Technician – Architectural/Engineering/Construction • CAD Technician – Mechanical Design and Manufacturing Fashion

• Custom Clothing • Fashion Marketing

• Historical Costume Making Fire Technology

• Fire Academy Preparation Graphic Communications Technology

• Apparel Graphics and Printing • Electronic Prepress

• Screen Printing for Small Business Machine Shop Technology

• Manufacturing Technology I • Manufacturing Technology II Medical Assisting

• Medical Office Receptionist • Medical Office Transcription Nursing

• Certified Nursing Assistant Photography

• Cinema­Cinematography • Cinema Production/Filmmaking Television and Radio

• Broadcast Journalism

• Media Programming and Management • Radio Broadcast Operations

• Radio Production • Television Production • Television Post Production • Video Operations

• Writing for Film, Television and Radio Welding

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Accounting­Bookkeeping: Accounting Clerk

Business and Computer Technology Division (626) 585­7341

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students to do such tasks as recording daily transactions in journals, posting figures into ledgers, and handling payments and receipts. Positions may require doing general office work. Knowledge of business math and the principles of bookkeeping, as well as skills in the operation of 10­key calculators and computers, are essential.

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Accounts Payable Clerk, Accounts Receivable Clerk, Financial Clerk, Bookkeeping Clerk, Auditing Clerk, Billing and Posting Clerk, Machine Operator, Bill and Account Collector, Payroll And Timekeeping Clerk, Procurement Clerk.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$32,208 ­ $34,644

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Most accounting, bookkeeping, and auditing clerks are required to have a high school degree at a minimum. However, having some college is increasingly important and an associate degree in business or accounting is required for some positions.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (18 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ACCTG 101* Bookkeeping­Accounting

or ACCTG 1A Accounting

BIT 11A Computer Keyboarding and Document Processing BUS 16 Office Machines

SEMESTER II

ACCTG 1A Accounting

or ACCTG 1B Accounting

ACCTG 104A Microcomputer Applications­ Accounting

BUS 11A Business Communications *Students who qualify to enroll in ACCTG 1A their first semester should do so and enroll in ACCTG 1B in their second semester.

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Accounting­Bookkeeping Assistant

Business and Computer Technology Division (626) 585­7341

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students to work in smaller organizations with full­charge bookkeepers to record debits and credits, compare current and past balance sheets, summarize details of ledgers, and prepare reports for supervisors and managers. In large offices, bookkeeping assistants are more specialized and their title may reflect the type of bookkeeping they do, such as accounts payable clerk or accounts receivable clerk. Knowledge of accounting and spreadsheet software is necessary.

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Accounts Payable Clerk, Accounts Receivable Clerk, Financial Clerk, Bookkeeping Clerk, Auditing Clerk, Billing and Posting Clerk, Machine Operator, Bill and Account Collector, Payroll and Timekeeping Clerk, Procurement Clerk.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$34,644 ­ $38,972

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Most accounting, bookkeeping, and auditing clerks are required to have a high school degree at a minimum. However, having some college is increasingly important and an associate degree in business or accounting is required for some positions.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (30­31 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ACCTG 101* Bookkeeping­Accounting

or ACCTG 1A Accounting

BIT 11A Computer Keyboarding and Document Processing BUS 16 Office Machines

SEMESTER II

ACCTG 1A Accounting

or ACCTG 1B Accounting

ACCTG 104A Microcomputer Applications­ Accounting

BUS 11A Business Communications

SEMESTER III

ACCTG 104B Microcomputer Applications­ Advanced Accounting BIT 25 Survey of Computer Technology

in Business

BUS 9 Introduction to Business BUS 114 Business Mathematics

or BUS 115 Business Algebra

or BUS 14A Mathematical Analysis for Business­Finite

*Students who qualify to enroll in ACCTG 1A their first semester should do so and enroll in ACCTG 1B in their second semester.

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Accounting­Bookkeeping:

Accounting­Bookkeeping

Business and Computer Technology Division (626) 585­7341

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students to seek employment as accountant­bookkeepers for public, private and govern­ mental institutions. Emphasis is on compiling and analyzing business records and preparing financial data, such as profit and loss statements, balance sheets, cost studies and tax reports. Application of accounting software packages for general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll and income tax. Accounting majors desiring to transfer to a four­year college or university should follow the Business Administration curriculum. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Accounts Payable Clerk, Accounts Receivable Clerk, Financial Clerk, Bookkeeping Clerk, Auditing Clerk, Billing and Posting Clerk, Machine Operator, Bill and Account Collector, Payroll and Timekeeping Clerk, Procurement Clerk.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$38,972 ­ $45,312

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Most accounting, bookkeeping, and auditing clerks are required to have a high school degree at a minimum. However, having some college is increasingly important and an associate degree in business or accounting is required for some positions.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (40­41 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ACCTG 101* Bookkeeping­Accounting BIT 11A Computer Keyboarding and

Document Processing BUS 16 Office Machines

SEMESTER II

ACCTG 1A Accounting

ACCTG 104A Microcomputer Applications­ Accounting

BUS 11A Business Communications

SEMESTER III

ACCTG 1B Accounting

ACCTG 104B Microcomputer Applications­ Advanced Accounting BUS 9 Introduction to Business BUS 114 Business Mathematics

or BUS 115 Business Algebra

or BUS 14A Mathematical Analysis for Business­Finite

SEMESTER IV

ACCTG 104C Microcomputer Applications­Payroll and Income Tax

BIT 25 Survey of Computer Technology in Business

BUS 12A Business Law

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE:

BUS 13 Business Lectures

*Students who have already taken ACCTG 1A and

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Business and Computer Technology Division (626) 585­7341

Occupational Skills Certificate

The curriculum prepares students to work in a wide variety of businesses. Emphasis is on basic mathematical skills, good manual dexterity, and oral and written communication skills, with the ability to deal tactfully and pleasantly with customers, apply problem solving techniques, business etiquette and ethics.

An Occupational Skills Certificate is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Cashier, Checker, Gaming Change Person, Booth Cashier.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$19,086 ­ 30,672

(Depending upon the level of education)

■ Education/Training:

Most cashiers are required to have a high school degree at a minimum. However, having some college is increasingly important and an associate degree in business or accounting is required for some positions.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS CERTIFICATE (11 units):

ACCTG 101 Bookkeeping­Accounting BIT 11A Computer Keyboarding and

Document Processing BUS 16 Office Machines

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Administration of Justice

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students for entry­level positions as police officers, police reserve officers, police assistants and community service officers in police and sheriffs departments and for positions in private security, as well as preparation for careers in probation, parole and federal law enforcement agencies.

Emphasis is on critical thinking, oral communication skills and writing skills, essential to today’s law enforcement employees. Students are kept informed of changes in law enforcement such as community policing, laws of arrest, search and seizure and updates to the state penal code. Role playing and Moot Court participation are included to enhance oral communication skills and preparation of written reports. Training is also provided in the area of crime analysis and use of computer technology in law enforcement.

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Police Officer, Deputy Sheriff, State Police Officer, State Trooper, Highway Patrol Officer, Fish and Game Warden, Deputy Marshal State Agent, Immigration Inspector, Federal Air Marshal, U.S. Secret Service Agent and Officer, Correctional Officer, Private and Criminal Detective and Investigator, Security Guard and Gaming Surveillance Officer.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

Police and Sheriff’s Patrol Officers, in CA: $73,511 Police and Detective Supervisors, in CA: $99,764 Detectives and Criminal Investigators, in CA: $79,740 (Depending upon the service agency)

■ Education/Training:

Applicants usually must have at least a high school education, and some departments require 1 or 2 years of college coursework or, in some cases, a college degree. Law enforcement agencies encourage applicants to take courses or training related to law enforcement subjects after high school. Many entry­

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (31 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ADJUS 10 Introduction to the Administration of Justice ADJUS 12 Concepts of Criminal Law ENGL 100 Reading and Writing Skills

or ENGL 1A Reading and Composition

SEMESTER II

ADJUS 14 Legal Aspect of Evidence ADJUS 16 Principles and Procedures of

the Justice Systems PEACT 37 Police­Fire Agility Training

SEMESTER III

ADJUS 18 Community Relations ADJUS 19 Principles of Investigation SPEECH 1 Fundamentals of Speech

or SPEECH 10 Interpersonal Communications

SEMESTER IV

ADJUS 22 Concepts of Enforcement Services ADJUS 128 Defensive Tactics

ADJUS 130 Firearms

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:

ADJUS 100A Domestic Violence ­ Overview ADJUS 100B Domestic Violence – Recognition,

Investigation, and Disposition ADJUS 121 Field Practice in Administration

of Justice

ADJUS 122 Field Practice in Administration of Justice

ADJUS 129 Advanced Defensive Tactics ADJUS 131 Principles of Search Warrants ADJUS 135 Regulatory Investigative

Techniques

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Social Sciences Division (626) 585­7248

Occupational Skills Certificate

The curriculum prepares an individual for the workplace environment with skills that apply to archaeological field excavation techniques, artifact analysis and preparation of the required governmental documentation associated with cultural resource management. The student may choose to work for either a private or a governmental agency as a cultural resource specialist.

An Occupational Skills Certificate is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Cultural Resource Specialist.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$37,300 ­ $51,890

(Depending upon the level of education)

■ Education/Training:

Most occupations in this field require training in voca­ tional schools, related on­the­job experience, or an associate degree.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS CERTIFICATE (17 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ANTHR 1 Physical Anthropology

ANTHR 1L Laboratory in Physical Anthropology ANTHR 2 Cultural Anthropology

SEMESTER II

ANTHR 3 Introduction to Archaeology ANTHR 12 American Indian Cultures One of the following

ANTHR 30A­H Anthropological Field Studies

SEMESTER III

ANTHR 30H Anthropological Field Studies Applications of Archaeological Field Work

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE:

BIOL 2 Animal Biology BIOL 30 Field Botany

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Automotive Technology:

All Automotive Systems

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in the automotive areas such as an apprentice mechanic, assistant technician, mechanic’s helper, pre­ delivery technician, installer, service technician, service attendant, or trainee smog technician. Students enrolling in the curriculum of Automotive Technology will have the opportunity to receive instruction and “hands­on” experience in diagnosis and repair of late model automobiles. Students must provide or purchase their own required hand tools. Instruction includes automotive engines, transmissions and drive lines (RWD & FWD) for both automatics and manual, suspension systems, braking systems (including ABS), air conditioning systems, engine performance, California State automotive emission laws, and diagnostic testing of computer control automotive systems. Upon successful completion of the curriculum a student receives credit for one year of work experience when applying for certification by the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Automotive Service Technician, Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technician and Mechanic, Diesel Service Technician and Mechanic, Small Engine Mechanic, Transmission Technician and Re­ Builder, Tune­Up Technician, Automotive Air­ Conditioning Repairer, Front­End Mechanic, Brake System Mechanic.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$35,100 ­ $47,080 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs

tification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diagnos­ tic and problem­solving abilities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal automotive training are likely to face competition for entry­level jobs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (59­61 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals AUTO 220 Engine Operation and Testing AUTO 221 Engine Machining and Rebuilding ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations

SEMESTER II

AUTO 222 Manual Transmission, Transaxles and Drivetrain

AUTO 223 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles

ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics

SEMESTER III

AUTO 50 Automotive Electrical Systems

or AUTO 151 Automotive Electronics AUTO 226 Engine Performance

AUTO 227 Advanced Engine Performance

SEMESTER IV

AUTO 224 Automotive Brake Systems AUTO 225 Suspension and Steering MACH 220A Introduction to Manufacturing

Technology

WELD 44A Introduction to Gas Welding WELD 44B Introduction to Electric Arc Welding

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:

AUTO 214A Basic Area Clean Air Car Course AUTO 214B Advanced Clean Air Course AUTO 214C Update Training Course –

Smog Check Program 2003 AUTO 215 Automotive Air Conditioning BUS 11A Business Communications BUS 116 Small Business Management

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Air Conditioning Technician

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in automotive air conditioning repair. Students will receive instruction and hands­on experience in servicing, repair and diagnosis of automotive air conditioning systems. The Refrigerant Handlers Certification Examination given by International Mobile Air Conditioning Society (IMAC) is included in this training. The use of precision equipment and specialty tools is emphasized.

Students are encouraged to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Exam for Heating and Air Conditioning (A7).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Air­Conditioning Repairer.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$25,880 ­ $35,100 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportuni­ ties in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE cer­ tification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diag­ nostic and problem­solving abilities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal automotive training are likely to face competition for entry­level jobs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (19­21 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations SEMESTER II

AUTO 50 Automotive Electrical Systems

or AUTO 151 Automotive Electronics AUTO 215 Automotive Air Conditioning ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information

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Automotive Technology:

Electrical/Electronics Systems

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry level employment in automotive electrical/electronic repair. Students will receive instruction and hands­on experience in proper service and diagnostic techniques and repair of automotive electrical/electronic systems. The use of preci­ sion measuring equipment and specialty tools are empha­ sized. Students are encourages to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) exam for electrical/electronics (A6).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Automotive Service Technician, Automotive Mechanic

■ Starting Annual Salary Range: $25,880 ­ $35,100

(Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportunities in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE certification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diagnostic and problem­solving abilities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (19­20 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics AUTO 50 Automotive Electrical Systems ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information

Technology (Basic)

SEMESTER II

AUTO 107A Technical Calculations

or ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics AUTO 151 Automotive Electronics

(20)

Engine Performance Technician

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in automotive engine performance. Students enrolling will have the opportunity to receive instruction and “hands­on” experience in diagnosing and repairing automotive engine driveability problems, carburetion, electronic fuel injection, ignition systems, emission testing and applicable laws. The use of precision equipment including lab scopes, engine and emission analyzers and other specialty tools is emphasized. Students must provide or purchase, if necessary, their own required hand tools.

Students are encouraged to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Exams for Engine Performance (A8) and Advanced Engine Performance (L1).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Mechanic, Diagnostic Technician, Small Engine Mechanic.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$25,880 ­ $35,100 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportunities in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE cer­ tification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diag­ nostic and problem­solving abilities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal automotive training are likely to face competition for entry­level jobs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (31­32 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals AUTO 50 Automotive Electrical Systems AUTO 220 Engine Operation and Testing ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics

SEMESTER II

ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information Technology (Basic)

AUTO 226 Engine Performance

AUTO 227 Advanced Engine Performance WELD 44A Introduction to Gas Welding

or WELD 44B Introduction to Electric Arc Welding

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:

AUTO 214A Basic Area Clean Air Car Course AUTO 214B Advanced Clean Air Course AUTO 214C Update Training Course­

(21)

Automotive Technology:

Powertrain Technician

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in transmission repair. Students will receive instruction and hands­on experience in removing, rebuilding, and adjusting manual and automatic transmissions and transaxles, clutches, drivelines, universal joints, constant­velocity (CV) joints, and differentials. The use of precision equipment and specialty tools is emphasized. Students must provide or purchase their own required hand tools.

Students are encouraged to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Exams for Automatic Trans­ mission/Transaxle (A2), and Manual Drive Train and Axles (A3).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Mechanic, Service Technician, Parts Repair Technician, Small Engine Mechanic.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$25,880 ­ $35,100 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportunities in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE certification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diagnostic and problem­solving abilities, and training

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (23­24 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information

Technology (Basic) WELD 44A Introduction to Gas Welding

or WELD 44B Introduction to Electric Arc Welding ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations

SEMESTER II

ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics AUTO 222 Manual Transmission, Transaxles

and Drivetrain

AUTO 223 Automotive Transmissions and Transaxles

(22)

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in brake and suspension repair. Students will receive hands­on instruction experience in removing, rebuilding, adjusting and re­installing brake systems and components of both foreign and domestic vehicles. A wide variety of vehicle models are discussed and used during the lab portion of the class. Both early and late model vehicles are covered during the course of the semester for both the brakes class and the steering and suspension class. Antilock brake systems (ABS) are discussed and service procedures are demonstrated. The use of precision equipment such as computerized alignment racks, brake disc and drum lathes and diagnostic scan tools keep students current with the latest industry standards. All applicable machining procedures and technical calculations are covered. Students are encouraged to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) exams for Suspension and Steering (A4), and Brakes (A5).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Automotive Body Repairer, Diesel Service Technician, Mechanic, Small Engine Mechanic.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$25,880 ­ $35,100 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophis­ tication, and most training authorities strongly recom­ mend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community col­ lege. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportunities in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE certification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diagnostic and problem­solving abil­ ities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal automotive training are likely to face competition for entry­level jobs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (23­24 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics WELD 44A Introduction to Gas Welding

SEMESTER II

ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information Technology (Basic)

AUTO 224 Automotive Brake Systems AUTO 225 Suspension and Steering

(23)

Automotive Technology: Underhood Technician

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares the student for entry­level employment in automotive engine repair. Students will receive instruction and hands­on experience in removing, measuring, rebuilding, adjusting and reinstalling automotive engines. The use of precision equipment and specialty tools is emphasized. Students must provide or purchase their own required hand tools.

Students are encouraged to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Exam for Engine Repair (A1).

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Automotive Body and Related Parts Repairer, Systems Mechanic, Diesel Service Technician, Mechanic, Small Engine Mechanic.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$25,880 ­ $35,100 (Depending upon the level of education and experience.)

■ Education/Training:

Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. Community College programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Job opportunities in this occupation are expected to be very good for those who complete high school or postsecondary automotive training programs and who earn ASE cer­ tification. Some employers report difficulty in finding workers with the right skills. People with good diag­ nostic and problem­solving abilities, and training in basic electronics and computer courses are expected to have the best opportunities. Those without formal automotive training are likely to face competition for entry­level jobs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (24­25 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

AUTO 32 Automotive Fundamentals AUTO 220 Engine Operation and Testing ELTRN 109A Applied Algebra for Electronics

or TECH 107A Technical Calculations

ENGL 435 Vocational English and Information Technology (Basic)

SEMESTER II

ELTRN 130 Introduction to Electronics AUTO 221 Engine Machining and Rebuilding WELD 44A Introduction to Gas Welding

(24)

Natural Sciences Division (626) 585­7140

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students to work in entry level positions in the field of biotechnology in high­tech industry and institutions. This is an interdisciplinary program including courses and practical training in math, chemistry, biology, computer skills and English. This program prepares students using SCANS guidelines. Emphasis is on practical laboratory skills combined with training in quality assurance and quality control in a working laboratory setting. Students are kept informed on current advances in biotechnology by speakers from industry, internet assignments and tours of local biotech facilities. This program offers classroom instruction plus supervised work experience in the biotechnology industry. Students must be willing to spend time working on long term projects and participating in outreach programs. Students must be able to provide their own transportation in the final semester to an internship site. Employment opportunities include: biomedical industry, academic research labs, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, food science labs, genetic engineering labs.

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Agricultural and Food Science Technician, Chemical Technician, Environmental Science and Protection Technician, Forensic Science Technician, Forest and Conservation Technician, Geological and Petroleum Technician, Nuclear Technician.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$40,629 ­ $63,396

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Science technicians can get good career preparation through 2­year formal training programs that combine the teaching of scientific principles and theory with practical hands­on application in a laboratory setting with up­to­date equipment. A solid background in applied chemistry, physics, and math is vital. Students with experience in laboratory­based courses, have completed internships, or have held summer jobs in laboratories also are well qualified for science technician positions and are preferred by some employers. A degree in business or accounting is often required.

PREREQUISITES

MATH 131 Intermediate Algebra CHEM 1A General Chemistry and

Chemical Analysis CHEM 22 Introductory Chemistry

RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:

Computer Literacy

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (49 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ENGL 1A Reading and Composition CHEM 1B General Chemistry and Chemical

Analysis

BIOL 1A Principles of Biology – Evolution, Diversity and Ecology

BIOL 102A Biological Technology

SEMESTER II

BIOL 1B Principles of Biology – Cellular and Organismal Biology BIOL 102B Biological Technology PHYSC 2 Scientific Method as Critical

Thinking

SEMESTER III

CHEM 8A Organic Chemistry MICRO 2 Microbiology

STAT 18 Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences

or STAT 50 Elementary Statistics

SEMESTER IV

BIOL 1C Principles of Biology – Introduction to Molecular Biology

BIOL 102C Biological Technology

SUMMER

BIOL 102D Biological Technology – Laboratory Internship Students who have previously completed coursework required for the Labortatory Assistant Option and need only the Biology 102A­D courses may take a “fast track” and complete the certificate in 1 year.

(25)

Biological Technology: Computational Biology

Natural Sciences Division (626) 585­7140

Certificate of Achievement

Today’s biotechnology companies depend on the ability of their employees to understand and use computational skills to handle large amounts of research data. This curriculum provides interdisciplinary skills required to seek employment at an entry level in performing data acquisition, management, and analysis in laboratory environments. The certificate program can also benefit working professionals seeking to advance or change their careers.

Students will learn programming, statistics, basic concepts of molecular biology, and use of bioinformatics applications and resources. The program emphasizes the skills necessary to become creative and flexible team members and leaders who can work with others in the dynamic interdisciplinary team environment found in today’s biotechnology companies.

Students in the certificate program will be required to complete a programming project in the Biology 28 class. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Statistician, Bioinformaticist, Biostatistician, Programmer, Biologist, Mathematician, Biotechnician, Computational Biologist.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$37,932 ­ $66,525

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Science technicians can get good career preparation through 2­year formal training programs that combine the teaching of scientific principles and theory with practical hands­on application in a laboratory setting with up­to­date equipment. A solid background in applied chemistry, physics, and math is vital. Students with experience in laboratory­based courses, have completed internships, or have held summer jobs in laboratories also are well qualified for science techni­

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (18­19 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

CIS 10 Introduction to Information Systems

One of the following:

BIOL 102A Biological Technology BIOL 102B Biological Technology BIOL 39 Modern Human Genetics BIOL 1A Principles of Biology –

Evolution, Diversity, and Ecology BIOL 1B Principles of Biology –

Cellular and Organismal Biology BIOL 1C Principles of Biology –

Introduction to Molecular Biology

SEMESTER II

STAT 18 Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences

or STAT 50 Elementary Statistics

CS 10 PASCAL

or CS 12 C Programming

or CIS 36 Introduction to Visual Basic

SEMESTER III

(26)

Natural Sciences Division (626) 585­7140

Certificate of Achievement

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Agricultural and Food Science Lab Assistant, Chemical Lab Assistant, Environmental Science and Protection Lab Assistant, Forensic Science Lab Assistant, Forest and Conservation Lab Assistant, Geological and Petroleum Lab Assistant, Nuclear Lab Assistant.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$39,686 ­ $45,223

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Prospective science technicians can get good career preparation through 2­year formal training programs that combine the teaching of scientific principles and theory with practical hands­on application in a laboratory setting with up­to­date equipment. A solid background in applied chemistry, physics, and math is vital. Students with experience in laboratory­based courses, have completed internships, or have held summer jobs in laboratories also are well qualified for science technician positions and are preferred by some employers.

PREREQUISITE:

MATH 125 Elementary Algebra REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (39 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

ENGL 1A Reading and Composition CHEM 2A Chemistry­General, Organic and

Biochemistry BIOL 11 General Biology BIOL 102A Biological Technology

SEMESTER II

BIOL 102B Biological Technology

CHEM 2B Chemistry­General, Organic and Biochemistry

PHYSC 2 Scientific Method as Critical Thinking

SEMESTER III

MICRO 2 Microbiology

STAT 18 Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences

or STAT 50 Elementary Statistics

SEMESTER IV

BIOL 102C Biological Technology

SUMMER

BIOL 102D Biological Technology – Laboratory Internship Students who have previously completed coursework required for the Laboratory Assistant Option and need only the Biology 102A­D courses may take a “fast track” and complete the option in 1 year.

(27)

Biological Technology: Stem Cell Culture

Natural Sciences Division (626) 585­7140

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students to work in entry level positions in the field of cell culture including stem cell culture. Emphasis is on practical laboratory skills combined with training in a working laboratory setting. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Stem Cell Research Specialist, Stem Cell Research Technician, Cell Culture Research Investigator, Quality Control Specialist, Cell Processing and Production Associate.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$37,932 ­ $61,032

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Science technicians can get good career preparation through 2­year formal training programs that combine the teaching of scientific principles and theory with practical hands­on application in a laboratory setting with up­to­date equipment. A solid background in applied chemistry, physics, and math is vital. Students with experience in laboratory­based courses, have completed internships, or have held summer jobs in laboratories also are well qualified for science techni­ cian positions and are preferred by some employers.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (30 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

MATH 131 Intermediate Algebra CHEM 22 Introductory Chemistry BIOL 102A Biological Technology –

Basic Techniques

SEMESTER II

CHEM 1A General Chemistry and Chemical Analysis BIOL 102B Biological Technology

SEMESTER III

BIOL 102C Biological Technology BIOL 2 Animal Biology

or MICRO 2 Microbiology

SEMESTER IV

(28)

Natural Sciences Division (626) 585­7140

Occupational Skills Certificate

The curriculum prepares students for work in entry level positions in the field of biotechnology in high­tech industry and institutions. Emphasis is on practical laboratory skills combined with training in a working laboratory setting.

An Occupational Skills Certificate is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Agricultural and Food Science Lab Assistant, Chemical Lab Assistant, Environmental Science and Protection Lab Assistant, Forensic Science Lab Assistant, Forest and Conservation Lab Assistant, Geological and Petroleum Lab Assistant, Nuclear Lab Assistant.

■ Starting Annual Salary Range:

$31,653 ­ $41,680

(Depending upon the level of education.)

■ Education/Training:

Prospective science technicians can get good career preparation through 2­year formal training programs that combine the teaching of scientific principles and theory with practical hands­on application in a laboratory setting with up­to­date equipment.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS CERTIFICATE (16 units):

SEMESTER I

BIOL 102A Biological Technology

SEMESTER II

BIOL 102B Biological Technology

SEMESTER III

BIOL 102C Biological Technology

SEMESTER IV

BIOL 39 Modern Human Genetics

SUMMER

BIOL 102D Biological Technology – Laboratory Internship

(29)

Building Construction

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Certificate of Achievement

The curriculum prepares students for working in the construction industry. The program qualifies graduates to seek employment as apprentice carpenters and journey­ level carpenters. Students may also complete up to two years experience which can be applied toward the required four years experience needed to qualify for a contractor’s license. Instruction is offered in all phases of construction from demolition of an existing structure to grading of land to, ultimately, a turn­key situation. Studies include safety, materials of construction, mathematics, blueprint reading, builders­level and transit, site work, foundation and floors, rough framing, roof framing, stair building, exterior finish, and interior finish. Additional studies included are timber construction, steel stud construction, grading of land, plumbing, HVAC, and various other specialty items that vary from project to project. The culminating student experience is the building of a single family dwelling.

A Certificate of Achievement is awarded upon completion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Construction Equipment Operator; Brick Mason, Block Mason, and Stonemason; Cement Mason, Concrete Finisher, Segmental Paver, and Terrazzo Worker; Structural and Reinforcing Iron and Metal Worker; Drywall Installer, Ceiling Tile Installer, and Taper; Plasterer and Stucco Mason; Painter and Paperhanger; Glaziers; Roofer; Carpet, Floor, and Tile Installer and Finisher; Insulation Worker; Hazardous Materials Removal Worker; Pipe Layer, Plumber, Pipe Fitter, and Steamfitter; Sheet Metal Worker; Electrician; Heating, Air­Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanic And Installer.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$40,573 ­ $51,318 (Depending upon the type of labor.)

■ Education/Training:

Persons can enter the construction industry with a variety of educational backgrounds. Those entering construction right out of high school start as laborers, helpers, or apprentices. Those who enter construction from technical or vocational school also may go

positions, or may transfer to jobs such as construction building inspector, purchas­ ing agent, sales representative for building supply compa­ nies, contractor, or technical or vocational school instruc­ tor. In order to advance to a management position, addi­ tional education and training is recommended.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT (44 units):

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE: SEMESTER I

BLDG 230A Building Construction

SEMESTER II BLDG 230B Building Construction SEMESTER III BLDG 230C BLDG 151 Building Construction

Cabinet and Millwork for Model Home Construction

SEMESTER IV

BLDG 230D Building Construction

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:

ARCH 14 Material and Processes of Construction

BLDG 122 Contractor’s Licensing BLDG 210A, 210B Building Construction

BLDG 212 Blueprint Reading for Construction BLDG 213 Building Construction Codes

and Standards

BLDG 214 Materials and Processes of Construction: Sub Grade to Floor Framing

BLDG 215 Materials and Methods of Construction: Floor through Roof Framing

BLDG 218 Inspection of Architectural Details BLDG 220 Estimating for Building

Construction

BLDG 221 Elements of Grading Inspection BLDG 222 Principles of Housing and Zoning

(30)

Cabinetmaking and Millwork

Engineering and Technology Division (626) 585­7267

Occupational Skills Certificate

The curriculum prepares students for working in the con­ struction industry in cabinetmaking and millwork. The program qualifies graduates to seek employment as an apprentice cabinetmaker and finish carpenter, and a jour­ ney­level cabinetmaker and finish carpenter. Students may also complete at least two (2) additional years expe­ rience where all related work can be applied towards the required four (4) years needed to qualify for a C­6 State of California Contractors License.

Instruction is offered in cabinetmaking, cabinet installa­ tion and millwork. Studies include safety in hand, pneu­ matic and power tools in the shop and on the jobsite, materials and take­off list, mathematics, print reading, cutting list, and cabinet assembly.

Additional studies included are cabinet finishing and installation, interior door installation, moulding making and installation, and estimating. The culminating student experience is the fabrication of cabinets and millwork, and their installation in the residential home project. An Occupational Skills Certificate is awarded upon com­ pletion of all required courses with a grade of C or better.

■ Related Occupational Title(s):

Apprentice cabinetmaker and finish carpenter, and a journey­level cabinetmaker and finish carpenter.

■ Starting Annual Salary:

$28,500 ­ $48,300

■ Education/Training:

People seeking woodworking jobs may attend col­ leges or universities that offer training in wood tech­ nology, furniture manufacturing, wood engineering, and production management. These programs prepare students for positions in production, supervision, engineering, and management and are increasingly important as woodworking technology advances. People seeking woodworking jobs can enhance their employment and advancement prospects by complet­ ing high school and receiving training in the follow­ ing areas:

• Design ­ Knowledge of design techniques, tools,

and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models; and

• Mechanics­ Knowledge of machines and tools,

including their designs, uses, repair, and mainte­ nance; and

• Mathematics ­ Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra,

geometry, calculus, statistics, and their application; and

• Production and Processing ­ Knowledge of raw

materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods; and

• Building and Construction ­ Knowledge of mate­

rials, methods, and the tools involved in the con­ struction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS CERTIFICATE (14 units):

Bldg 152A Cabinetmaking for the Student Built Home Construction Bldg 152B Cabinet Installation & Millwork for

Home Construction

Bldg 212 Print Reading for Construction Bldg 220 Estimating for Building

Construction

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:

Bldg 210A Building Construction Bldg 230A Building Construction Tech 107A Technical Calculations

References

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