Christian Education

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DISTANCE, REMEMBRANCE, TOLERANCE: EUROPEAN REMARKS ON CONTEXTUAL CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

DISTANCE, REMEMBRANCE, TOLERANCE: EUROPEAN REMARKS ON CONTEXTUAL CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

Individuals, groups and communities are coping with conflicts and crisis, which include the diversity of lifestyles. This statement can be made in different ages and cultures; it becomes of interest when combined with a church or confessional context. Therefore, the first issue and authority for Christian education is how to develop opportunities to find one’s own ways of remembering leading to a tolerant attitude towards other ways of life. The study underlines the importance of the contextual approach in Christian education (consisting of religious, systemic, biographical and intercultural research) by analyzing examples of different European traditions. Decoding, deconstructing and reconstructing coping strategies and cultures of remembrance in a contextual way make sure that only by facilitating opportunities of sharing experiences people and organizations can learn to cope with transitions and difficulties in a reasonable and equitable manner.
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Holding Fast: Christian Education Across the Centuries

Holding Fast: Christian Education Across the Centuries

Several Christian colleges and universities rose to the occasion and began training teachers with a view toward Christian education. Christian publishers began producing educational texts and materials, and today many Christian textbooks are available at all grade levels—even some at the college level. Mod- ern technology continues to make Christian education even more accessible for many families with video, satellite, and computer-based classes and cur- riculum.

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REGENT COLLEGE Distance Education APPL 522: CHRISTIAN EDUCATION AND EQUIPPING: THE MAKING OF MATURING DISCIPLES OF JESUS

REGENT COLLEGE Distance Education APPL 522: CHRISTIAN EDUCATION AND EQUIPPING: THE MAKING OF MATURING DISCIPLES OF JESUS

15. Writing an Inductive Study of Ephesians 16. A Theology of Christian Education 17. Varieties of Learning Styles/Modes 18. What Kind of Teacher Are You? 19. Teaching Disciples to Pray (Part I) 20. Teaching Disciples to Pray (Part II) 21. Group interaction and prayer 22. Teaching Genesis 1-3 – Part I 23. Inductive study in Genesis 2-3 24. Teaching Genesis 1-3 – Part II

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A Case Study of Stakeholders’ Motivation to Invest in Classical Christian Education

A Case Study of Stakeholders’ Motivation to Invest in Classical Christian Education

unfamiliar with the classical Christian philosophy expected that SLA would be different than the schools at which they worked previously. Many teachers in this category did not know the exact differences they were looking for, but recognized in SLA, that the philosophy was different. The teachers who had little-to-no knowledge of classical Christian education also held the philosophy in high value, even if they had only worked at SLA for a short time. Other teachers, who were familiar with the classical Christian philosophy expected SLA to operate with little-to-no elements of a progressive educational philosophy. The teachers in this category also expected certain elements of the classical Christian philosophy to be implemented. These elements included: building a foundation of knowledge and providing a well-rounded education by educating the whole child. The teachers in this category found a high level of value in their investment in classical Christian education as well. There were some teachers at SLA, mostly those who attended a classical liberal arts college, who knew a great deal about the classical Christian philosophy. Teachers in this category expected that the classical Christian philosophy would be adhered to with fidelity at SLA. They expected that their classical Christian school would hold the same standards that their classical liberal arts college held and that the education would look similar to what they had experienced while attending their college. The teachers in this category placed a great deal of value in their investment in preparing to teach at a classical Christian school.
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The Executive Council Report of The Presiding Bishop's Task Force on Christian Education in Congregations

The Executive Council Report of The Presiding Bishop's Task Force on Christian Education in Congregations

Lessons drawn from history, information and comments from the report forms, the holistic vision of Christian education in the local congregation articulated by those i[r]

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Guide to the Records of the Board of Christian Education of the Evangelical United Brethren Church

Guide to the Records of the Board of Christian Education of the Evangelical United Brethren Church

The Board of Christian Education of the Evangelical United Brethren Church was responsible for the program and work of Christian education. The Division of the Local Church was responsible for the development and promotion of program and gave program guidance for us in the educational ministry of the local church. The Division of Higher Education was responsible for the initiation and coordination of denominational policy related to collegiate education, theological education and pastoral services. The Division of Curriculum Research and Development shared joint responsibility in the area of education curriculum for the denomination with the Board of Publication.
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Providing Christian Education for All Ages

Providing Christian Education for All Ages

The course is a basic introduction to the field of Christian education. Christian education has its foundations in two primary areas: (1) Christian theology and (2) education. Therefore, we will be exploring the theological roots—both in the Bible and history—of Christian education and the education principles and practices that enable our efforts to be effective and relevant. The primary context in which Christian education takes place is the community of faith, which is most often expressed in the local church. So our study will focus primarily on Christian education in the local church and the various types of educational settings and structures present there. At the completion of the course, the students and teacher will have a clearer understanding of how Christian faith is nurtured in persons and communities. They will be equipped with some basic skills to create strong educational structures, materials, and practices for use in their own settings. They will also have a growing passion to see children, youth, and adults become Christians and be nurtured in Christian faith. Notes from the Original Authors
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Increase Meaning: A Wholistic Approach to Christian Education

Increase Meaning: A Wholistic Approach to Christian Education

College Credits: 5 credits through Seattle Pacific University are awarded for completing this course. SPU is on a quarter system. The semester equivalent of 5 quarter credits is 3.33 semester credits. The transferability of these SPU credits is at the discretion of the receiving institution. If you are an undergraduate student, this 5000 level class may not transfer into your program. This is a continuing education class that is considered an elective, and is primarily used for professional development.

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The principles and practice of Christian education in the churches of England and Scotland, 1900 1965

The principles and practice of Christian education in the churches of England and Scotland, 1900 1965

The Huguenots in France, the Reformed Church in Holland, the Puritans in England, the Presbyterians in Scotland, all followed in different ways and with varying success the school and un[r]

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Providing Christian Education for All Ages

Providing Christian Education for All Ages

An ordained Christian minister has as his or her chief responsibility to declare in many ways the whole Story of God as fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth. His or her charge is to “tend the flock of God . . . not under compulsion, but willingly, not for sordid gain but eagerly. Do not lord it over those in your charge, but be examples to the flock” (1 Pet 5:2-3, NRSV). The minister fulfills this charge under the supervision of Christ, the chief Shepherd (1 Pet 5:4). Such ministry can be fulfilled only after a period of careful preparation. Indeed, given the ever-changing demands placed upon the minister, “preparation” never ceases.
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Psychological type profile of Canadian Baptist youth leaders : implications for Christian education

Psychological type profile of Canadian Baptist youth leaders : implications for Christian education

displayed by professional Christian youth workers in the United Kingdom. The the new data generated by this study confirms the importance of not generalising research findings from one church context to another. The psychological profile of Christian youth leaders is not the same in the Convention of Atlantic Baptist Churches as within Evangelical Churches in England. Moreover, these differences are not confined to the orientations and to the attitudes that were the primary concern of the present study, but extend to the perceiving functions and to the judging functions as well.
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An investigation into the use of film and literature in the Christian education of children aged 10-12years.

An investigation into the use of film and literature in the Christian education of children aged 10-12years.

Since early times, storytellers and writers of drama have introduced unexpected devices or characters into their works to resolve a conflict or enliven the plot. Pinsky refers to the Greeks use of an actor portraying a god who would descend onto the stage in a basket, which they called deus ex machina (literally, “god from the machine”). He says Disney decided to use magic to achieve this in his stories rather than any one religion, Christian or other. 219 The strategy worked. As Pinsky observes, “Disney characters are arguably far more recognisable around the world than images of Jesus and Buddha.” 220
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Confessional christian schools and education in Brazil

Confessional christian schools and education in Brazil

Socratic philosophy the act of teaching becomes the task of the "friends of wisdom" (philosophers). Several centuries have passed until, in middle age, or Scholastic, the production of knowledge and training of clergy, besides the aristocracy, had become responsibility of the monastic and convent schools directly linked to the Catholic Church. In the 16th century, the social changes triggered transformations of scientific, cultural, political, economic, etc., caused crises in various institutional segments, finished in major reforms as the Protestant and the Catholic Counter-Reformation. The changes that passed European society and the Renaissance spirit of blossoming together with the colonizing process of Spain and Portugal, finished promoting advances in popularization of knowledge. In colonial Brazil, the Society's of Jesus priests (Jesuits) have begun to establish educational institutions and from the mid-18th century come new congregations and Catholic religious orders, and several Protestant denominations that come to weave the confessional education Brazilian lands. Keywords— Reform; Counter-Reformation; Christian Education; Curriculum Jesuit; Protestants Schools.
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Prenatal Life Education Based on Family Christian Religious Education

Prenatal Life Education Based on Family Christian Religious Education

Child education as early as possible starts from the mother's womb, this gives an understanding that the importance of parent / adult education in the function to educate. Adult education can be a parent education strategy for children. According to Ismail Andar (1996), by educating adults at the same time we educate young children. Educating adults means educating teachers in the family. According to Judaism, the family is the place where God's will is revealed to the child (Ismail Andar ,1996) , Even Boehlke (2015) said that the scope of Jewish religious education was not a sideline endeavor in one corner of life, but rather a core part of daily activities (Deuteronomy 6: 4-9). So, family work is a core institution in educating children. In line with this, Andar Ismail agrees with Lewis Joseph Sherrill. Sherrill writes menulis “ The most fundamental for education is this assumption : the elemental facts of family life constitute the channel through which the will of God should first be made known to a child, and be put into effect in his living. The family was a mould into which a growing revelation of the nature and will of God could be poured without undermining the family itself. On the contrary, the growing religion strengthened the family to a rare degree. In Hebrew Thougt the family was ‘in the Lord’ and ‘he in it’. Furthermore, Ismail Andar (1996) said that today the church believes that Christian education needs to start at the age group of children as early as possible. If it is believed by the church then the strategy is to start Christian education for parents because these parents will carry out Christian education in children. In connection with PAK Life for pregnant women, the role of prenatal education is very important to be seen as a form of educational communication between mother and fetus during the womb. Baby education in the womb is a tangible form of life education. Psalms 139: 16 says "Your eyes saw me as a child, and all of your days are written in your book before any of them are written. There is an Hebrew word: Golmî (English: formless thing, embryo which is translated by the Indonesian Bible Institute with the word "future child" (Bible Works 7: 2018). God started the education process when humans were still children. This begins with God valuing life because He understood and saw while humans were still children, and wrote in His book. This means that prenatal education is a priority scale from God and must be a priority scale for the lives of God's people too.
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Experiencing education in the new Christian schools in the United Kingdom : listening to the male graduates

Experiencing education in the new Christian schools in the United Kingdom : listening to the male graduates

rehearsing the foundation narratives of the 17 schools. Theologically, pioneers of the new Christian schools conceptualise a strong division between the Kingdom of God and the secular world. They take a high view of the responsibilities of Christian parenting and seriously question whether it is right for Christian parents to send their ‘child to be trained by someone who may not know the Lord and may even despise him and his truth’ (p 14). They argue that, in comparison with the secular school, the Christian faith posits ‘a radically different curriculum’ (p 133) and ‘a radically different view of the child’ (p 134). According to this view, ‘Christianity affects the whole of life and there is a Christian perspective on all that is being taught’ (p 132). Going beyond the topics taught, there is emphasis placed on the view that ‘Christian education involves character building’ (p 49). In particular Baker and Freeman (2005:49) argue that consistent exposure to what is right develops the ability to recognise what is right, and the protection from destructive influences and pressures at an early age results in strength to withstand these when the child is older. Above all, the greatest priority in the children’s education is for them ‘to come to know the Lord’ (p 27).
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The Use of Contemporary Music in the Christian Religious Education of Young Adults

The Use of Contemporary Music in the Christian Religious Education of Young Adults

During the seventeenth century, schooling was primarily by tutors and reserved to those families who could pay for it. John Baptist De La Salle 52 established schools that were begun especially for the poor children who would normally have been roaming the streets or put to work from as early as 10 years of age. The educational methodology that he used more closely resembles current experience – classrooms where most students will be concentrating on the same subject or topic. However, De La Salle‟s educational methodology was more holistic than simply “group teaching” implies. The schools following his charism known as Lasallian schools are “to provide a human and Christian education to the young, especially the poor”. 53
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Christian philosophy of education in South Africa: the cultural-historical activity theory to the rescue?

Christian philosophy of education in South Africa: the cultural-historical activity theory to the rescue?

A third approach is indicated, one that on the one hand possesses the power of a systematic theory while on the other hand cannot be construed as a “grand narrative” that attempts to explain in the finest detail education as a phenomenon and a process, thereby acting as a virtual cookie cutter for educational practice (marked by sameness and a lack of originality; mass-produced). The value of a theory, as Halverson (2002: 244-5) correctly argued, lies in how well it can shape an object of study by highlighting the relevant issues; in other words, how well the theory can serve as a classification scheme in that it provides relevant insights into the object that it is applied to. A relevant theory has the ability to bring certain aspects regarding education into focus while it allows less relevant aspects to fade into obscurity. In view of this, an appropriate theory possesses at least the following four characteristics. It firstly possesses descriptive power in that it helps us make sense of and describe education as a phenomenon or process. Second, it possesses rhetorical power in that it helps us talk about education, provides a conceptual structure and serves as a map of the education world. Third, it possesses inferential power: it helps us make inferences about education and shows us where to look for relevant information. Finally, it possesses application power: it helps us apply our knowledge about education in the real world, among others for pragmatic reasons. A theory that complies with these four requirements is capable of gathering together all the isolated bits of data about Christian education into a coherent conceptual framework of wider applicability (Cohen, Manion & Morrison, 2011: 9). The search for a theory that complies with all these requirements has unearthed a theory known as the cultural-historical activity theory (the CHAT). Analysis of this theory reveals that although it was first conceived in Russia in the period around the 1917 Revolution by Lev Vygotsky and further developed by theorists such as Leonti’ev and Engeström (Asghar, 2013: 19-22; Stetsenko & Arievitch, 2004: 476; Yamagata-Lynch, 2010: 13, 25-26; Postholm, 2015: 43), it seems to dovetail in several respects with the work of Talcott Parsons in the West (Parsons, 1973; 1990; 1996). For purposes of this article, as Wilson, Cole, Nixon, Nocon, Gordon, Jackson, Garia and Minami (2013: 1) advised, “the differing formulations [of the CHAT could be seen] as expressions of a single family of theoretical commitments”. Examination of the CHAT shows that Yamagata-Lynch (2010: 24) is correct in concluding that the CHAT could serve as a framework to help identify the boundaries of a complex system such as embodied in the term “Christian education” (cf. White, 2012: 14).
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Traditions of Excellence in Christian Higher Education

Traditions of Excellence in Christian Higher Education

The Master of Education and the Master of Education (Honours) courses are designed for teachers and school leaders wishing to pursue postgraduate study in Education. Particular focus is given to the role of the Christian teacher/ administrator in enhancing moral and faith development within a context of Christian education. The Master of Education is offered as either a coursework degree or a combination of coursework and research. The Master of Education (Honours) is a research degree that prepares graduates for further work involving educational research. Studies are available in four areas:
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The impact of Christian Higher Education on the lives  of students and societies in Africa

The impact of Christian Higher Education on the lives of students and societies in Africa

One day my husband came home, drunk as usual, and said that we must enrol for further studies at Hefsiba. I told him that it is a Christian institution and that they would not permit an alcoholic to enrol. He said he would quit drinking, and during the interview, he repeated his commitment. We were accepted as students and experienced unconditional acceptance from our fellow-students and lecturers. Our classes always started with devotions. We received Bibles and started to read them. Because we were biblically illiterate, we could not pray and did not know God. In time, I got to know God as a loving Father, who wants the best for his children, who is in control and who leads his children on the right way, if only they would heed his voice. We learned so much and it helped us to overcome our pain and difficulties. Things changed and in our second year, our children were re-united with us. They were overjoyed to see the change in us. Our neighbours similarly noticed the changes in our lives, especially the way my husband helped me with domestic chores – something very uncommon in Mozambique. His “drinking colleagues” were upset at losing their friend, but he convinced them to also enrol at Hefsiba, and they experienced similar changes through Christian education based on biblical principles. My professional life changed dramatically – I have patience with my clients, good relationships with my colleagues and as a result of the improvement in my work, I was promoted. Today, people come to me for Christian counselling.
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The Diary and Notes of Marcus Christian as a Site of Rhetorical Education, Entries 1924-1945

The Diary and Notes of Marcus Christian as a Site of Rhetorical Education, Entries 1924-1945

addresses the situation at hand in order to change the situation. “The situation,” argues Bitzer, “is the source and ground” that drives the rhetoric (5-6). Christian views his rhetorical situation to be one that captures his mind, driving him to spend too much time worrying about what his white neighbors do and say. Thus, his thoughts, actions, and words are driven by his relationship to a white world. Christian discerns as well that his rhetorical situation has merely the façade of being binary, of black world versus white world. He is astute enough to grasp that the oppression of a white supremacist system harms both blacks and whites. He is also aware that the power to change the situation is within him, but he knows he cannot change his world in any immediate way. In analyzing his reality and self-writing his existence as a man greater than the South will acknowledge, he is writing, as Lejeune says, to a future he cannot see. Christian writes to a moment ahead in which people, perhaps, will see him as the writer he has constituted himself to be, and he recognizes that his diary can teach him something about himself. With this self- awareness and keen perception of the present, a solid grasping of the history of black people in the South, and the hope that the future will be different, he in many ways straddles time.
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