Combat Veterans

Top PDF Combat Veterans:

A conversation with Laura Browder When Janey Comes Marching Home: Portraits of Women Combat Veterans Note:

A conversation with Laura Browder When Janey Comes Marching Home: Portraits of Women Combat Veterans Note:

Women are still barred from many combat roles. Yet here we were in the middle of two wars in which women were serving in unprecedented numbers, and in positions of great danger—as convoy gunners, explosives-sniffing dog handlers, military police. Sascha and I were discussing the issue of women in the war, and we decided to collaborate on a story for which we would interview and photograph women combat veterans.

5 Read more

Conscripted without Induction Order: Wives of Former Combat Veterans with PTSD Speak

Conscripted without Induction Order: Wives of Former Combat Veterans with PTSD Speak

The aim of the current study is to examine several aspects of negative long-term effects of war: the lives of wives who are living with former combat soldiers suffering from chronic PTSD, from the subjective perspective of the wives themselves. Most studies that have examined the effects of PTSD have fo- cused on the lives of the soldiers and were based on quantita- tive methods. Some studies have focused on the effects of this situation on families (e.g., Gold et al., 2007) and fewer studies have examined the issue from the veterans’ or their wives’ per- spectives (e.g., Ray & Vansone, 2009). The current phenome- nological study is based on in-depth interviews with twenty women married to former combat veterans who have been af- fected by PTSD for many years. The purpose of this study is to give us a glance into how life looks when one’s husband has chronic PTSD. The majority of relevant research has focused on wives’ stress symptoms, while other issues have been stud- ied to a much lesser extent.
Show more

7 Read more

Predictors of psychiatric disorders in combat veterans

Predictors of psychiatric disorders in combat veterans

One other limitation of the study is that the number of psychiatric diagnoses in the sample was relatively small, making it likely that we lacked sufficient power to detect small effects. Another notable limitation relates to our use of military medical records for the mental disorder outcome data. Combat veterans in our sample who had a mental disorder but who never sought help would have been counted as not having a psychiatric diagnosis, thus adding error to the data. It is likely that this underreporting of common mental disorders (e.g., anxiety, mood disorders) would have lead to a reduction in the effect sizes found in this study, compared with true effects sizes that would have been found if all cases of mental disorders were known. In other words, the results reported in the present study are probably an underestimation of the true effect sizes.
Show more

11 Read more

From Combat Veterans to Criminals: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Criminal Justice Involvement

From Combat Veterans to Criminals: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Criminal Justice Involvement

Some service members who chose to report this feel that they are showing weakness and cowardice for admitting they have a problem which has a high chance in resulting in them making false reports of not having PTSD. The most common stigma to care by veterans has been reported to be that of veterans feeling discomfort when seeking help and the social consequences for seeking care (Ouimette et al. 2011). Barriers to care have also been known to show up as a result of stigma and culture of the military; as consequence service members feel that they cannot ask or receive help with dealing with the stress that is brought on by combat exposure as stated before (Britt et al. 2007). Over all the culture and stigma of the military have the increased potential to cause veterans to slip through the cracks and not get the proper diagnosis that they need. As well as in a way the military itself is having a hard time opening admitting the flaws/mistakes, and the issues that surround the funding of veterans who have mental health problems. Stigma relates to CJI in PTSD combat veterans in such a way that it unknowingly can prevent the veteran from seeking help for their psychological symptoms. As a ramification of not seeking help the combat veteran with PTSD could increase their risk of CJI by seeking out other ways to cope with their PTSD symptomology. Making it so that the individual is unaware of behavioral changes that CBT Theory in this study will contribute in identifying.
Show more

137 Read more

Posttraumatic growth in combat veterans with PTSD  A literature review

Posttraumatic growth in combat veterans with PTSD A literature review

Using the categorization of Davis and Brody (1979) the majority of studies (n=13) advise a tertiary prevention treatment to help lowering PTSD in combat veterans, meaning that the prevention is utilized as a ‘… form of crisis intervention.’ (Yassen, 1995, p. 180). As Dekel et al. (2016) proved, PTSD symptoms decrease over time when supported by a psychological, PTG-fostering intervention. In line with that, Tsai et al. (2016) discovered that PTG was still prominent after a two-year period. This indicates a long lasting effect of PTG. The minority of the articles (n=4) advised to apply PTG interventions as primary prevention, meaning that treating veterans happened before deployment and the potential confrontation with an adverse event. All of these studies emphasize the protective character of PTG and suggest utilizing it as a buffer towards potential first or repeated adversity. Maguen et al. (2006) found an opposing mechanism. These studies assessed the impact of demographic, pre-, actual-, and post-deployment variables on PTG. Despite pre-deployment, all variables had an impact on PTG, which pleads against utilizing PTG-promoting interventions before deployment takes place. None of the articles explicitly plead for a secondary prevention treatment. This is in line with the observation that none of the studies measured the impact of PTG directly after the traumatizing event.
Show more

36 Read more

Reactivity and Recovery Among OIF/OEF/OND Combat Veterans: Do Those with Subthreshold PTSD Differ From Veterans with and without PTSD?

Reactivity and Recovery Among OIF/OEF/OND Combat Veterans: Do Those with Subthreshold PTSD Differ From Veterans with and without PTSD?

The primary purpose of this research was to expand the current literature on subthreshold PTSD by assessing the relationships between PTSD, reactivity and recovery from negative emotional arousal or stress among current-era combat Veterans, Secondarily, we examined the moderating effects of combat exposures and dissociation, as well as the mediating effects of depression in the relationship between PTSD and cardiovascular reactivity. Measures of cardiac impedance were employed during a non-trauma motivated performance speech task and a passive trauma imagery procedure. While the emphasis of this research was on Veterans with subthreshold PTSD, we conducted assessments between the PTSD/No PTSD groups so that comparisons to prior literature distinguishing only PTSD from no PTSD could be made. Additionally, we conducted PTSD-S/PTSD-/PTSD assessments to compare our results to prior literature that distinguishes only PTSD-S from PTSD- and to further expand the literature comparing PTSD-S from PTSD-. After co-varying for age, sex and body mass index,
Show more

115 Read more

Mental health among Iranian combat veterans with ankle-foot neuromusculoskeletal injuries

Mental health among Iranian combat veterans with ankle-foot neuromusculoskeletal injuries

Studies in different countries have found high rates of mental disorders among veterans, especially posttrau- matic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression [10]. There are several studies that reported a high prevalence of mental disorders such as depression, psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, and hypochondriasis among surviving vet- erans, from those serving in World War II to the Persian Gulf War [11]. Similar results have been described in Iranian studies, with some reporting a high Global Severity Index (GSI) above the cutoff point of the Symp- tom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) in more than 95% of Iranian veterans sustaining physical and chemical in- jury [12], as well as high rates of depression, anxiety, anger, and aggression [13]. However, veterans with purely physical disorders, such as ankle-foot neuromus- culoskeletal disorders, are often neglected in psycho- logical assessments because mental health evaluations are usually focused on those with a psychological dis- turbance or with a high percentage of injury. Moreover, with the use of orthotics, especially ankle-foot orthoses and prostheses, these parts of the body are usually cov- ered by clothes. Thus, this appearance may mask the depth of the influence of the physical problem on the in- dividual’ s psychological well-being, and as a result, vet- erans with such injuries may be assumed to have normal mental health despite their disability. According to the VMAF, 10,227 ankle-foot injured veterans have survived the Iran-Iraq war, and most of them have suffered two or more injuries. The hypothesis of this study was that having ankle-foot neuromusculoskeletal injuries would be associated with high rates of psychological problems among veterans. Thus, this study was designed to evalu- ate the psychological status of combat veterans with ankle-foot neuromusculoskeletal problems.
Show more

9 Read more

<p>Retrospective study of cardiovascular disease risk factors among a cohort of combat veterans with lower limb amputation</p>

<p>Retrospective study of cardiovascular disease risk factors among a cohort of combat veterans with lower limb amputation</p>

The EMED consists of veterans injured during combat, so results presented here may not be generalized to civilian cohorts or to patient populations with limb injury or amputation as a result of medical comorbid disease, such as diabetes, or other trauma. Because the CVD outcomes data are somewhat limited at this time, we used average measures instead of a repeated mea- sures analysis. This approach is internally valid for the purpose of this study within the VA system. While veterans with a unilateral lower limb amputation had the longest follow-up period, the number of lipid and blood pressure measurements were not signi fi cantly dif- ferent between the three groups (results not shown). The increase in MAP by amputation status is small (<2 mmHg), corresponding to relatively small changes in SBP or DBP. It has been well-documented that the risk of CVD-related disease and death is directly related to blood pressure in middle-aged populations. 39 While this change in MAP may not be clinically relevant, change may increase over time and warrants further study. The de fi nition of metabolic syndrome was based on admin- istrative data sources and not direct measures for insulin resistance, which include fasting insulin levels and for- mal glucose challenge testing. Several of the parameters used to de fi ne metabolic syndrome, including fasting glucose and waist circumference, were not readily avail- able. Whether this underestimated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is not clear.
Show more

10 Read more

Healthcare Options for Veterans

Healthcare Options for Veterans

There are a number of criteria that a veteran must meet in order to be eligible for the VA Medical Benefits Package. The veteran must not have been given a dishonorable discharge. They must also meet minimum duty requirements (generally 24 continuous months of service) unless they were discharged because of a disability related to their service. There are additional factors that determine if a veteran is eligible for VA health benefits, and if they are required to pay co-pays for healthcare services. Recent combat veterans are eligible for full VA health benefits for a period of five years after the date of their discharge, regardless of their income and assets. “Recent combat veterans” is defined as veterans who were discharged from active duty after January 28, 2003. Also, veterans who were disabled in the line of duty during active service are eligible for full VA health benefits, including care for illnesses or injuries unrelated to the military service. The VA makes a determination of the severity of a veteran’s disability and provides a disability rating between 0% and 100%.
Show more

15 Read more

A Comparative Analysis of MMPI and Rorschach Findings Assessing Combat Related PTSD in Vietnam Veterans—Analysis of MMPI and Rorschach Findings Assessing PTSD

A Comparative Analysis of MMPI and Rorschach Findings Assessing Combat Related PTSD in Vietnam Veterans—Analysis of MMPI and Rorschach Findings Assessing PTSD

Projective methods, such as the Rorschach, offer some dis- tinct contributions for assessing combat-related PTSD. They are often less direct and intrusive than objective tests, which helps circumvent the guardedness of trauma survivors. Re-experi- encing the traumatic events through recollections, nightmares, or flashbacks can severely interfere with the cognitive proc- esses set in motion by the Rorschach, and particularly with the capacity to perceive events objectively and to think logically (Ephraim, 2002). Studies using the Exner scoring system have found the Rorschach useful in the assessment of civilians with PTSD and in identifying PTSD in nonveteran groups of adults (Sloan, Arsenault, & Hilsenroth, 2002). However, to this date only a limited number of published studies used the Rorschach in the assessment of PTSD focusing on U.S. combat veterans of the Vietnam War. Findings in regards to the assessment of PTSD in Vietnam Veterans using the Rorschach have shown contradictory results.
Show more

7 Read more

MILITARY AND VETERANS AFFAIRS

MILITARY AND VETERANS AFFAIRS

war memorials in Holmdel, Trenton and Atlantic City. The Division is also responsible for determining veteran eligibility for State civil service preference as well as administering various State Grants--In-- Aid pensions and tuition assistance. Post--Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) counseling for veterans and their families is available at no cost through a statewide network of professional providers. Informa- tion and emergency access is available 24 hours per day/seven days a week at 1--866--VETS NJ 4U (1--866--838--7654).

14 Read more

VETERANS SERVICE OFFICE

VETERANS SERVICE OFFICE

The colors outside are changing and the air is a little crisper that can only mean that Ole Man Winter is right around the corner again. That also means we will be inside more and more suspect to the little colds that lead to more serious health issues like FLU. You can combat the Flu bug this year with a shot. The VA is trying to reach out to those who have to make long trips to St Cloud or the Minneapolis VA’s to get there shots. On October 15 the St Cloud VA will have a traveling flu shot clinic. They will be at the American Legion in Sauk Centre from 09:30 – 11:30. Then they will travel to the Belgrade VFW to set up shop from 1:00 – 3:00. If you are enrolled in the VA Health System you can receive your flu shot at one of these clinics. If you use the Alexandria CBOC you can get your shot at one of these clinics. Don’t miss out on a great opportunity.
Show more

5 Read more

Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Air Force Health Study (AFHS). Operation Ranch Hand was responsible for spraying herbicides in Vietnam between 1962 and 1971. In 1982, Air Force investigators began a study investigating the long-term health problems of pilots and ground crews engaged in spraying herbicides in Vietnam. The study cohort consisted of more than 1,200 Ranch Hand veterans and more than 19,000 comparison Air Force veterans who did not spray herbicides. AFHS data collected between 1979 and 1993 revealed no statistically significant differences between the Ranch Hand personnel and the comparison cohort both for all-cause mortality and for cause- specific mortality. The exception was an increased mortality rate for circulatory diseases seen in enlisted ground crew personnel, a group at higher risk for skin exposure to herbicides. In 2005, an AFHS update reviewing 20 years of epidemiologic data on mortality rates reported a small, but significant, increase in all- cause death rates for Ranch Hand veterans. This was the first published research to find a statistically significant increase in the relative risk for all-cause mortality among Ranch Hand veterans. 24 After 20 years of analysis, data collection, and
Show more

10 Read more

Recent Crimes and the Veterans

Recent Crimes and the Veterans

Making comparisons with the pre-war years of 1936 to 1940 inclusive it is observed that arrests during 1946 for the younger group-those twenty years of age or under-has increased tremend[r]

9 Read more

Vietnam Veterans and PTSD

Vietnam Veterans and PTSD

Magruder, K.M., Serpi, T., Kimerling, R., Kilbourne, A.M., Collins, J.F., Cypel, Y., . . . Kang, H. (2015). Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder in Vietnam-era woman Veterans: The health of Vietnam- era women’s study (Health VIEWS). JAMA Psychiatry, 72, 1127-1134. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1786 Importance: Many Vietnam- era women Veterans served in or near war zones and may have experienced stressful or traumatic events during their service. Although PTSD is well studied among men who served in Vietnam, no major epidemiologic investigation of PTSD among women has been performed. Objectives: To assess (1) the onset and prevalence of lifetime and current PTSD for women who served during the Vietnam era, stratified by wartime location (Vietnam, near Vietnam, or the US), and (2) the extent to which wartime location was associated with PTSD, with adjustment for demographics, service characteristics, and wartime exposures. Design, Setting, and Participants: Survey of 8,742 women who were active-duty military personnel in the US Armed Forces at any time from July 4, 1965, through March 28, 1973, and alive as of survey receipt as part of VA Cooperative Study 579, HealthVIEWS. Data were obtained from mailed and telephone surveys from May 16, 2011, through August 5, 2012, and analyzed from June 26, 2013, through July 30, 2015. Main Outcomes and Measures: Lifetime and current PTSD as measured by the PTSD module of the CIDI, version 3.0; onset of PTSD; and wartime experiences as measured by the Women’s Wartime Exposure Scale–Revised. Results: Among the 4219 women (48.3%) who completed the survey and a telephone interview, the weighted prevalence (95% CI) of lifetime PTSD was 20.1% (18.3%-21.8%), 11.5% (9.1%-13.9%), and 14.1% (12.4%-15.8%) for the Vietnam, near-Vietnam, and US cohorts, respectively. The weighted prevalence (95% CI) of current PTSD was 15.9% (14.3%-17.5%), 8.1% (6.0%-10.2%), and 9.1% (7.7%-10.5%) for the 3 cohorts
Show more

13 Read more

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS. Veterans Health Administration Washington DC 20420

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS. Veterans Health Administration Washington DC 20420

Resolution: The VISN and Medical Center have established that 30 patient care records will be reviewed, along with ongoing professional practice evaluation (OPPE) data, for each ph[r]

11 Read more

Department of Veterans Affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs

OALC Response: The contemporaneous documentation in support of the award decision completely contradicts the IG's determination. The Source Selection Decision Document (SSDD) states: "The benefits of Offeror A's Outstanding rated technical proposal, with nine (9) significant strengths, justifies the 16% and/or 22% price premium over Offeror C and/or Offeror B respectively. The Government is certainly willing to pay the aforementioned premium for an approach which demonstrates extensive knowledge, understanding, experience, and expertise in Security Operations Support, System Initiation Security Implementations, Cyber Security, Privacy Program, and Incident Rapid Response in support of VA enterprise wide information security and risk management program. The significant strength of Offeror A's proposed team skills is impressive and results in low proposal risk to the Government as well as a decrease learning curve. Due to the high value placed on maintaining the confidentiality, integrity, availability, and privacy of Veterans data, it is in the Government's best interest to award to an offeror with a low technical risk. (Refer to Attachment 2 – SSDD, pg 9)
Show more

16 Read more

State Aid to Veterans

State Aid to Veterans

Four States have established edu- cational benefits for the first time. Oklahoma and South Dakota extended free public school privileges to vet- erans over age 21 up through the twelfth grade. The Oklahoma law, however, restricts free schooling to a period equivalent to the amount of time the veteran spends i n the armed forces and makes i t available only i f the veteran otherwise would have completed his schooling by age 21. Montana has provided that all bona fide residents of the State at the time of entry into the armed forces shall have free fees and tuition i n any and all units of the University of Montana, including the law and medical de- partments. Michigan p r o v i d e s moneys f r o m a relief f u n d during the war period only, for use by returning veterans for educational purposes.
Show more

9 Read more

VETERANS DISABILITY BENEFITS

VETERANS DISABILITY BENEFITS

VBA is currently taking steps to improve the timeliness of claims and appeals processing; however, prospects for improvement remain uncertain because timely processing remains a daunting challenge. VBA is using contractors to handle some aspects of the claims process, and is also shifting some workload between regional offices. Also, VBA is modifying and streamlining certain claims and appeals processing procedures for veterans who opt to participate in these initiatives in exchange for an expedited decision. For example, veterans receive expedited processing when they submit a claim that is certified as having all required evidence. Not many veterans have elected this option, but VA is making adjustments to increase its attractiveness. In addition, VBA is trying to decrease the amount of time it takes to gather medical evidence. For example, VBA recently encouraged medical providers to use a standardized form when responding to VBA’s request for information. However, results of this initiative have been mixed. VBA is also taking steps to streamline the claims process, including implementing initiatives to create (1) standardized language for
Show more

58 Read more

Department of Veterans Affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs

DATES : Comments must be received by VA on or before December 30, 2013. ADDRESSES : Written comments may be submitted through www.regulations.gov; by mail or hand-delivery to the Director, Regulations Management (02REG), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Room 1068, Washington, DC 20420; or by fax to (202) 273–9026. (This is not a toll-free number.) Comments should indicate that they are submitted in response to ‘‘RIN 2900–AO81—Standard Claims and Appeals Forms.’’ Copies of comments received will be available for public inspection in the Office of Regulation Policy and Management, Room 1063B, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (except holidays). Please call (202) 461–4902 for an appointment. (This is not a toll-free number.) In addition, during the comment period, comments may be viewed online through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at www.regulations.gov.
Show more

21 Read more

Show all 1258 documents...