Emotional Intelligence

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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

But what if we were to view emotions in a different way altogether, as another kind of "intelligence," beyond reason and logic? An intelligence that — if we could learn to access it — could become a source of greater collaboration, improved productivity and increased effectiveness. The fact is, such an intelligence exists – it is called emotional intelligence. In CRM's new program, Emotional Intelligence, you will learn that emotions are far more than just the "distraction" to our worklives that we've been conditioned to believe. In fact, emotions have immense practical value in helping individuals and organizations be more adaptable and ultimately more successful.
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

UNESCO Commission on Education in the year 1972 declared that education is a life long process and its purpose is to establish a learning society – a society which knows how to learn, to grow and transform itself to the needs of ever changing world. G.Manimaran (2013),argues that A best education system is not only improving the I.Q. (Intelligence quotient) of students but also equally the E.Q and the study confines, renewing and updating of the curriculum to take care of newly emerged science like emotional intelligence is a must to improve the standard of education and competency of our students.
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENT TEACHERS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENT TEACHERS

DEC-JAN-2015, VOL-II, ISSUE-VII www.srjis.com Page 1092 this study. The Emotional Intelligence Scale standardized by Hyde, A., et al (2001) has been utilized to collect the data from the above mentioned sample of the study. In the present study the word emotional intelligence mean the scores gained by sample subject on Emotional Intelligence Scale. The Emotional Intelligence scale comprises of ten factors viz; Self-awareness, empathy, self motivation, emotional stability, managing relations, integrity, self-development, value orientation, commitment, and altruistic behavior. As per the manual, the tool interpretation has been made i.e. maximum score indicates high emotional intelligence and minimum score indicates low emotional intelligence.
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Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

Abstract The research focused on the personal and social competencies of Hungarian teachers as unexplored areas. The participants in the survey were 707 Hungarian teachers from elementary and secondary schools. In view of the expectations of the European Union related to new teacher roles, the following research question was formulated to guide the study: can the Hungarian teachers meet the expectations of the European Union regarding the expected competencies? The results proved that about one third of the participants seem uncertain personalities that might be in connection with low communicative and emotional capacities, mainly as a result of their poor emotional intelligence. This study aims to highlight the characteristics of teachers’ emotional intelligence. The weakest part of teachers’ emotional intelligence is the sense of their emotions and controlling them. One quarter can interpret their partners’ emotions correctly, one third becomes hesitating. The majority believe they are good at interpreting emotions. One quarter are not capable of conveying the right emotions, two-thirds claim they can regulate their emotions, but this means suffocating their emotions. However, most of them would be suitable to interact efficiently. They are eager to take care of other people and their strong wish for parity foster social relationships.
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Emotional Intelligence: A Review of Researches

Emotional Intelligence: A Review of Researches

Mathematics abilities is received by students through hard and diligent works, their learning with control of good emotion can indicate by high intelligence and influential of anyone to think, the force them to use certain way of thinking, follow the principle refers to the certain rules that has basis in accordance with the reasoning ability. If the students use the right way in learning mathematics, they will get the high achievement of mathematics. Mathematical creativity is an essentially amoral cognitive skill that can serve any purpose as determined by one's own sense of moral and ethical behaviour, as well as one's emotional needs whether conscious or unconscious. Therefore, emotional intelligence is crucial for the utilization of this skill in a healthy and productive way. Emotional intelligence in social interaction of students through of empathetic, and skill interaction with their friends, and coordination relationship of interaction in learning within following mathematics instructional process in classroom as the requirement for students to reach success in learning. It was therefore concluded that apart from cognitive factors, emotional intelligence of students also affects their mathematical abilities. There are also many studies which are showing the relationship of Emotional Intelligence with socio-demographical variables. As should be clear from the above discussion, emotional intelligence provides a basis for the kind of creative thinking and problem solving necessary in mastering a skill and developing the capacity for intellectual reasoning. In addition, the capacities enumerated as part of emotional intelligence allow creative thinking to be utilized in interpersonal relationships in the sense of facilitating the capacity for empathy, perspective-taking, putting aside one's own needs in the face of a greater situational need, the ability to "read" the context of a situation and the making of appropriate choices.
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Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Education

Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Education

discussed, advanced emotional intelligence can be beneficial in many areas of life. However, the application of its usefulness has been most frequently documented in the professional workplace. Cherniss (2000) outlined success and motivation factors for evaluating and improving emotional intelligence competencies.

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Emotional Intelligence and Ethics on Organizations

Emotional Intelligence and Ethics on Organizations

The concept of Emotional Intelligence arises proposed by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey in 1990 [28], through an article in the magazine “Imagination, Cogni- tion and Personality” [29], and not by Daniel Goleman as often judged. It is observable a stimulating body of research in EI, but with a still lack of onceptual con- sensus which led to a different measuring instruments proliferation [30]. This body of research is still dismem- bered and dispersed [16]. The domain of reasoning that takes into consideration the emotions, namely, the use of emotions as a basis for thought and hink with them is part of what is considered Emotional Intelligence by Reference [5]. According to Reference [5] EI is “the abi- lity to perceive accurately, appraise, and express emotion; the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and the ability to regulate emo- tions to promote emotional and intellectual growth” (p. 10). There is an explicit “marriage” between emotion and cognition in this definition [31], therefore, the autors defined EI as the ability to recognize the meaning of emotions and their relationships, the reasoning and pro- blem solving based on emotional knowledge [27]. In its turn, Reference [1], defines EI as “a person’s ability to motivate herself and persist despite the frustrations; to control impulses and delay reward; to regulate their own mood and prevent discouragement overwhelm the faculty of thinking; to empathize and feel hope” (p. 54). Refe- rence [14] consbstantiates EI to the “competence to iden- tify and express emotions, understand emotions, assimi- late emotions in thought, and regulate both positive and negative emotions in the self and in others” (p. 3).
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: AN EMPIRICAL WORK

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: AN EMPIRICAL WORK

The first comprehensive, theory-based battery for assessing emotional intelligence as a set of abilities was the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS, Mayer, Salovey and Caruso, 2002), which can be administered through interaction with a computer program or via pencil-and-paper (Mayer, Caruso, and Salovey, 1998, 1999). The MEIS comprises twelve ability measures that are divided into four branches, reflecting the model of emotional intelligence presented earlier: (a) perceiving and expressing emotions; (b) using emotions to facilitate thought and other cognitive activities; (c) understanding emotion; and (d) managing emotion in self and others (Mayer and Salovey, 1997). Branch one tasks measure emotional perception in faces, music, designs, and stories. The second branch measures synaesthesia judgments (e.g., “How hot is anger?”) and feeling biases (translating felt emotions into judgments about people). Branch three examines the understanding of emotion. Sample questions include, “Optimism most closely combines which two emotions?” A participant should choose “pleasure and anticipation” over less specific alternatives such as “pleasure and joy.” Branch four comprises two tests oriented to measure emotion management in the self and in others. The MSCEIT (Mayer Salovey and Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test) is also based on the four-branch model of emotional intelligence, but allows for the assessment of emotional intelligence in less time than the MEIS. Poorly worded items have been eliminated, and extensive normative data will be available.
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Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and

Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and

A review of recent literature in the field of linguistics shows a growing interest in research over the relationship between emotional intelligence and various aspects of language learning including speaking fluency (e.g. Bora, 2012), vocabulary knowledge (e.g. Jamali Nesari et al., 2011; Asadollahfam et al., 2012), writing performance (e.g. Abdolrezapour, 2013), and general language proficiency (e.g. Shakib & Barani, 2011; Zarezadeh, 2013). There are also studies which have explored the influence of a variety of individual difference variables including motivation (e.g. Takahashi, 2005), language proficiency (e.g. Matsumura, 2003; Takahashi, 2005), learning environment (e.g. Matsumura, 2001; Schauer, 2006), target language exposure (e.g. Matsumura, 2003), and length of residence in target language country (e.g. Bella, 2012) on the development of pragmatic awareness. However, there is a dearth of research on assessing the relationship between emotional intelligence and pragmatic awareness.
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Emotional Intelligence on Career Satisfaction

Emotional Intelligence on Career Satisfaction

Abstract — Emotional intelligence (EI) describes the ability, capacity, skill, or self-perceived ability to identify, assess, and manage the emotions of one’s self, of others, and of groups. People who possess a high degree of EI know themselves very well and are also able to sense the emotions of others. They are affable, resilient, and optimistic. There are positive associations between EI and career satisfaction (CS). For example, the literature showed satisfaction with work has demonstrated a considerable impact on success in life and in overall psychological wellbeing. Controlling our emotions and expressing it adequately can make a difference in business. Therefore, this paper reviews the influence of EI on CS. Data were collected using a questionnaire conducted on online entrepreneurs. The data were analyzed using SPSS Version 23 and Structural Equation Modeling (SmartPLS).
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Emotional Intelligence and Health Outcomes

Emotional Intelligence and Health Outcomes

3.2. Emotional Intelligence and Health Outcomes: What We Know To date, two comprehensive literature reviews examined the evidence associat- ing EI with various indicators of health outcomes. Both are quite consistent in their findings. Both reviews have divided health outcomes in at least two do- mains: psychological/psychogenic health outcomes and physiological health outcomes. Both meta-analyses found similar effect sizes averaging 0.35 for the association with psychological health and 0.25 - 0.27 for physical health measures (Martins, Ramalho, & Morin, 2010; Schutte et al., 2007). An addi- tional, recent meta-analysis also lends support to the validity of the associa- tions between EI and various aspects of emotional and psychological well-being (Sanchez-Alvarez et al., 2016). Most of the evidence shows consistent positive associations between measures of EI and criteria for well-being (e.g.: Austin, Saklofske, & Egan, 2005) and negative associations between EI and measures of stress and anxiety (Landa et al., 2008). Beyond these striking findings we see a moderate yet relatively consistent association between measures of EI (both within the ability and trait traditions) and measures of psychological health (e.g.: depression, distress, etc.) with meager evidence pointing to a weaker yet similar trend vis-à-vis criteria of physical health. Simply put, EI seems to consistently associate with various health outcomes, but how and why? That’s another issue that is yet to be thoroughly explored. That being said, there are preliminary pieces of evidence pointing to a few potential models. We’ll briefly review two of the leading ones:
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A study on emotional intelligence at work place

A study on emotional intelligence at work place

Nelis, Quoidbach, Mikolajczak and Hansenne (2009) “Emotional Intelligence Interventions to Increase Student success” focused on the construct of emotional intelligence (EI) which refers to the individual differences in the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. As these differences have been shown to have a significant impact on important life outcomes. This study investigated, using a controlled experimental design, whether it is possible to increase EI. Participants of the experimental group received a brief empirically derived EI training while control participants continued to live normally. The researchers found a significant increase in emotion identification and emotion management abilities in the training group. Follow-up measures after 6 months revealed that these changes were persistent. No significant change was observed in the control group. These findings suggest that EI can be improved and open new treatment avenues.
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Emotional intelligence through the Bhagavad-Gita

Emotional intelligence through the Bhagavad-Gita

A man’s destiny is shaped by his thoughts and not by mere actions. A man is still considered pure even when he does certain unacceptable actions only per force, (on the demands of the situation or having a larger interest in mind) but with his mind detached. Like the one described above, there are innumerable instances in the Indian epics and the puranas which uphold this view and the eastern philosophy sees this doctrine of controlling one’s mind as a way of living and not as some abstract philosophical thought. It believes and imbibes the responsibility that every man is accountable for each and every act and thought of his. This accountability brings caution and enables him to restrain himself from thinking or acting in haste. The mind has the potential of shaping a man’s destiny. The five senses of a man are capable of enmeshing him in the mire of emotional upheavals. The mind which is superior to the senses, if controlled and focused, helps a man attain peace from within. The recent theory of ‘Emotional Intelligence’ which has gained popularity also wakes up to the importance of understanding and controlling one’s emotions as the defining factor of one’s success or failure in life. The advocates of emotional intelligence (EI) claim that it is a person’s capacity to understand his own emotions and those of others and the use of this knowledge to the best of his interests that helps him climb the ladder of success.
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A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT ON MEASURES OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT ON MEASURES OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

Neither Goleman et al., (2002) nor Caruso et al. (2002) specifically align their EI-based leadership models within the commonly accepted leadership models such as those presented by Yukl (1994), Burns (1978), and Bass (1990). Caruso et al. (2002) consider EI as an underlying component of leadership functions that facilitates effective leadership practice. George (2000) proposes that from an ability model position, EI-based leadership is based on no specific leadership theory, but instead has its roots in a variety of theoretical traditions. However, Goleman et al.’s (2002) model of EI-based leadership draws the strongest explications towards particular leadership theories, specifically, the transformational/transactional leadership model. The complementary transformational/transactional leadership model (Bass, 1990) is the general framework used for examining the empirical relationships between emotional intelligence and effective leadership (Gardner & Stough, 2002). Burns (1978) distinguishes the transformational leader as one who raises the needs and motivations of followers and promotes change/development in individuals, groups and organisations, and the transactional leader as one who meets subordinates’ current needs by focus on extrinsically motivated based exchanges (Gardner & Stough, 2002). Bass (1990) defines the transformational leader as “one who arouses awareness and interest in the group or organisation, increases the confidence of the individuals or groups, and attempts to move the concerns of subordinates to achievement and growth rather than existence” (Gardner & Stough, 2002, p. 68). Bass’s (1990) concept of transformational leadership is fundamentally driven by a leader’s emotional intelligence as each factor represents the emotional competencies
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Emotional Intelligence in Peace Journalism: A four-part paper Section One: Emotional Intelligence and Trauma in Journalism

Emotional Intelligence in Peace Journalism: A four-part paper Section One: Emotional Intelligence and Trauma in Journalism

This paper will examine the benefit of linking the two relatively new concepts of 'Emotional Intelligence' and 'Peace Journalism'. The aim is to explore how media people, media interest groups and the general public, together, can influence the current media culture through an increased awareness about the impact of media productions, reporting styles, journalistic conventions, and the risks affecting journalists today, including that of becoming traumatized through emotionally challenging media work. The objectives further include raising public awareness about the impact of media productions on populations in different contexts and the need for active public participation in the debate about the desirability of certain media productions in society. Views from the fields of psychology, trauma therapy, journalism, and peace and conflict studies will be presented and examined to ascertain how findings and experiences from these areas can be beneficially combined to work towards achieving these objectives in the media context.
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

The present research aimed to study the emotional intelligence among college students, to find out the level of emotional intelligence of a sample of college students. To find out whether there is gender difference in emotional intelligence. Sample of the study consisted 70 undergraduate students of Government home science college Hassan, Karnataka, studying in B.A. & B.Sc. Among them 30 are male &40 are female. Personal and socio demographic datasheet (prepared by the Investigator), Emotional Quotient scale (prepared by Anukool Hyde, SanjyotDethe and UpinderDhar) was used to collect the data. Scoring was done as per the direction given in the Manual.‘P’ value & inter correlation has been calculated to find out the objectives of the present study. The result indicates that, among 70 undergraduatesstudentsmales have slightly high self awareness, empathy, integrity, emotional stability, self development, commitment when compared to females and high self motivation, managing relations compared to females. While females have slightly high altruistic behavior compared to male.
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Emotional Intelligence: A Panacea to Language Teaching

Emotional Intelligence: A Panacea to Language Teaching

Emotions have been the subject of philosophical inquiry for many centuries. Focusing on students’ emotion has a deep humanistic pedagogy. The philosophy behind humanistic perspective can be investigated from different streams of thought. In this regard, Gadd (1998) makes a distinction between romantic, pragmatic, and rhetorical views towards humanism. Romantic humanists place emphasis on students’ emotions and claim by invoking their inner selves, successful learning will be encouraged. In this regard, Shakouri and Nazari (2012) assert that at the heart of humanism, a sort of freedom in talk is observed. In fact, peace and talk are intertwined. If this democratic talk is valued and students are let talk from their vantage points learning will be facilitated. Pragmatic humanism, according to Gadd (1998), in contrast, argues that understanding students’ motivations, attitudes, reactions, and cognitive strengths and weaknesses is indispensible to respond more effectively to their needs. In a sense, if teachers have a politically clear stance in the class towards their students, learning will be humanized (Shakouri & Nazari, 2012), and henceforth students’ emotional intelligence will be raised since teachers can fulfill their role as the shapers of students’ behaviors. Rhetorical views, also, assert that students must be taught a variety of skills in order to be encouraged to express their feelings.
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Empathy, Neutrality and Emotional Intelligence: A Balancing Act for the Emotional Einstein

Empathy, Neutrality and Emotional Intelligence: A Balancing Act for the Emotional Einstein

Boulle suggests that the mediator’s role in improving the emotional environment of a mediation is a key element in settling conflicts. 9 ‘In broad terms, mediators can contribute to an emotional environment for the parties by contributing a trustworthy person and process, and by otherwise providing a setting that is hospitable and non- threatening.’ 10 To improve the emotional environment of a mediation, the mediator must develop and inspire the confidence and trust of the parties involved. 11 Whilst a neutral and well-communicated structural framework to the mediation can increase the parties’ confidence in the process, an emotional connection between the mediator and each party can instil faith and trust in the mediator as a person. The way a mediator manages this emotional connection is one of the most important drivers of a successful mediation. When skilfully managed, the establishment of an emotional connection with the parties can lead to a productive empathic bond that fosters trust and openness. When mismanaged, a mediator can emotionally under or over-commit to a party, leading to impressions of partiality and potential compromise of process (that is, non-neutral language, uneven speaking time for parties, biased intervention strategies). A mediator with high emotional intelligence is less likely to mismanage this emotional connection, and as a result is far more likely to help parties achieve their mediation goals.
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(2004) Measuring Emotional Intelligence

(2004) Measuring Emotional Intelligence

If this individual were to have had lowly emotional intelligence, many of the emotional aspects of his life might have been ignored. Although he may look successful on the outside, he may need to contend on a daily basis with the aggravations and frustrations of the fact that his success in life, real though it is, did not extend to dealing with the emotions of those around him, or, for that matter, with his own

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(2004) Controversies in Emotional Intelligence

(2004) Controversies in Emotional Intelligence

Anyway, I sometimes think that you disparage all the self-report work over the last 4 decades (this is probably not an accurate impression, but it is how it feels). I don’t think this is good. We’ve come too far. The last four decades of research utilizing self-reports has helped us to understand why people suffer. We are getting to the point where maybe we can reduce human suffering. The evidence is coming in... John D. Mayer: In regard to measuring emotional intelligence: I am a great believer that criterion-report (that is, ability testing) is the only adequate method to employ. Intelligence is an ability, and is directly measured only by having people answer questions and evaluating the correctness of those answers. I am, however, a great defender of self-judgment data for other purposes. For example, you mentioned that self-judgment has allowed us to get a handle on why and how people suffer, and I agree entirely with that position. I think self-judgment data represents the single best approach to measuring personal
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