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Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

This is an important category, as it is rarely possible to find a children’s work, either literary books or audiovisual material, without these cultural elements. These references provide the target audience with more details and better understanding of the source culture. According to Klingberg (ibid: 36), when cultural context adaptation is thought to be necessary, more explanation can be added when possibble. From his point of view, children are interested in detailed descriptions of food of other cultures and that reading about what children eat and drink in a different culture might raise the interest of the target children. Hence, Klingberg gives the translator the freedom to use more words if needed to describe the food and drink references. For example, Klingberg (ibid: 38) argues that replacing ‘knäckebröd med mesost’ (crispbread with whey-cheese) by the generic ‘cheese’ in Maria Cripe’s The Night Daddy is not a good idea since the dish is very typically Swedish. Thus, explanation is needed in such case. Since Harry Potter movies include similar references, more examples will be investigated in the analytical section of this thesis.
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The Tlonic World of Harry Potter: An Idealistic Version of Magical World

The Tlonic World of Harry Potter: An Idealistic Version of Magical World

The novels as objects of cultural phenomena are presumed to be more than merely representatives of the children’s literature of escape and commercialism. In order to meet such expectation, papers and books have been written touching upon different aspects which lead to a better exploration of the series’ depth and a profound understanding of the themes. Among the most significant contributions, the followings can be mentioned: Biswas’s exploration of magic realism in the series, Cherland’s detection of discourse of gender, Natov’s searching for the ordinariness in the extraordinary nature of the novels, Krueger-Kischak’s discovering the allusions to God and the concept of love, Stojilkov’s theory of the immortality of love in Harry Potter (1997-2007), and many different other perspectives that have been taken into account regarding the series. The significance of this research study is to hopingly contain a new approach different from the ones made so far which contributes to the weight of the existing researches on the Harry Potter (1997-2007) series through juxtaposing the magical world of Harry with the idealistic one of Jorge Luis Borges’s Tlon which has not been dealt with previously and can be considered as original in choosing idealism for its methodology.
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Humour loss in the Indonesian translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Humour loss in the Indonesian translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

The objective of the study is to explore the preservation of humour, much of which depends for its impact on incongruity, the unexpected and wordplay – what Delabastita refers to as the “communicatively significant confrontation of two (or more) linguistic structures with more or less similar forms and more or less different meanings” (1996, p. 128) - in the Indonesian translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. In order to achieve this objective, two approaches are adopted in this paper. We analyse the translation techniques used by the Indonesian translator of HPSS when dealing with the humorous elements of the novel, drawing on Molina and Albir’s classification of translation techniques (Molina & Albir, 2002). Additionally, acknowledging Attardo’s caution that the “problems for an essentialist theory of humor are manifold” (Attardo, 1994, p. 3), we analyse the results of questionnaires completed by young readers, in order to ascertain whether passages or events in the novel that are deemed humorous in English are also perceived as such by Indonesian readers. While making no claims for an “essentialist” theory of humour, we aimed to discover whether, within the parameters of different versions – the original and a translation – of a given text, humour can be retained across both linguistic and cultural barriers.
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Harry Potter and the Action Prediction Challenge from Natural Language

Harry Potter and the Action Prediction Challenge from Natural Language

Harry Potter novels define a variety of spells. These are keywords cast by witches and wizards to achieve purposes, such as turning on a light (‘Lu- mos’), unlocking a door (‘Alohomora’) or killing (‘Avada Kedavra’). They abstract complex and non-ambiguous actions. Their use also makes it possible to build an automatic and self-annotated corpus for action prediction. The moment a spell occurs in a text represents a response to the en- vironment, and hence, it can be used to label the preceding text fragment as a scene description that ends up triggering that action. Table 1 illustrates it with some examples from the original books.
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Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

Frazer, Wittgenstein and Harry Potter: an approach to the ritual manipulation of images

I want to suggest that Harry Potter can help to focus the issue. I have in mind the episode at the opening of the second book in the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. As usual, the book opens in the household of the Dursley family, Harry's unwilling guardians. An argument has broken out about the nocturnal disturbances created by Harry's owl, but the thread is broken by his cousin Dudley's demands for more bacon for his breakfast. He tells Harry to pass the frying pan and Harry replies «You've forgotten the magic word». The result is uproar in the household and Harry quickly clarifies «I meant "please"!», but it takes some time for the fuss to die down 25 . In the context of the book this is simply a joke, playing on Harry's ability to do «real» magic and the conventional English witticism naming «please» a «magic» word. But I want to suggest that it is a productive passage. The rituals of human societies, including the image rituals of Giuliano Guizzelmi, are much more like saying «please» than they are like the magic of Rowling's wizards. Indeed, as I have argued
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Fairytale authenticity: historic city tourism, Harry Potter, medievalism and the magical gaze

Fairytale authenticity: historic city tourism, Harry Potter, medievalism and the magical gaze

carapace, acting as a ‘heritage time-turners’ (adapted from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by Lovell and Bull, 2017, p.39), enabling experiential authentication. The fantasy sensation of time- travelling has been established as a commonality of tourism (Laing and Frost, 2012, p.11; Rickly- Boyd, 2012, p.129) and was a frequent observation made by many participants: Tourist 42: “Something that attracts me to Canterbury is that it is a medieval city. And (in a way) I feel transported in time.” Time-travelling tourists found that medieval hosts inhabiting metaphysical edgelands where habitual, familiar simple gestures were being repeatedly reinscribed on the space, such as opening windows, passing through gateways, or drinking pints of beer. A picture of an open mullioned window was taken by Tourist 19 (see image 4).
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IN THE SUPREME COURT OF HOGWARTS BETWEEN REGINA AND. HARRY POTTER Accused

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF HOGWARTS BETWEEN REGINA AND. HARRY POTTER Accused

You should have little difficulty deciding whether the Crown has met the first three elements. Identity, time and place all seem clear. Lord Voldemort identified the accused today. You also heard witnesses testify that the murder occurred on November 3rd, on the third floor of Hogwarts Academy, as described in the indictment. Another ingredient the Crown must prove is that Harry Potter murdered Professor Quirrel. You will recall the evidence of Harry in which he admitted that he murdered the professor and Exhibit #1 the ashes of Quirrel. The other ingredients the Crown must prove is that Harry killed the professor wrongfully and intended to kill him. In deciding these issues, you should consider the following evidence:
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Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

Understanding Racism and Sexism in Harry Potter and Stuart Hall’s Model of Three Reading Positions

“Males are represented more often, but they are also depicted as wiser, braver, more powerful, and more fun than females” (ibid.). Female powerlessness is most evident in the portrayal of Hermione, who often shows signs of fear. As an example Heilman cites the attack of the mountain troll when the boys have to save Hermione because she is merely crouching helplessly under the sink and screaming (Rowling 1999, 132). Heilman argues, somewhat inaccurately, that Hermione is supposed to be exceptionally intelligent, but not brave or daring. Further, her knowledge is only of use to the boys while she does not know how to use it or cannot use it. This can be explained through the understanding of Harry Potter as a mythic hero. Both Hermione and Ron are only helping Harry since he is the principal protagonist of the story (Nikolajeva 2003, 127). Although Heilman draws attention to such instances as the Polyjuice Potion which helps the boys to sneak into the Slytherin House, it does not work on Hermione so she has to stay behind; or when Hermione becomes ‘petrified’ but still manages to aid Harry and Ron with the help of a note in her hand which reveals the secret of Salazar’s successor. It is important to stress that in the final battle Harry always fights alone because Ron also fails half way. This happens at the end of each book: in The Philosopher’s Stone Ron sacrifices himself on the chessboard and Harry confronts Squirrel alone; in The Chamber of Secrets the ceiling of the tunnel collapses and Ron remains trapped; in The Prisoner of Azkaban Hermione helps Harry rescue Black and Buckbeak while Ron rests injured in the infirmary; in The Goblet of Fire Harry confronts Lord Voldemort while Ron and Hermione watch the competition from the stands for the spectators; in The Order of Phoenix Harry has several helpers, among them Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Neville, and Luna; in the sixth book, The Half-Blood Prince, Ron and Hermione stay at Hogwarts while Harry joins Dumbledore in his search for a part of Lord Voldemort’s soul. Another proof of Hermione’s bravery and daring is the scene in The Chamber of Secrets when she tries to convince the boys they should make the Polyjuice Potion:
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Permanent Functions of Characters’ Proper Names in Harry Potter

Permanent Functions of Characters’ Proper Names in Harry Potter

directness and/or significance of the characteristics the appellations refer to, characteristics that can generally be divided into two categories: physical and non-physical. The meaningful names in the Harry Potter series include thirty-one nomina propria of the first kind; they refer to hair color (Albus, Ginger, the Weasel, Regulus Arcturus Black, Rufus Scrimgeour), feature of one body part (Krum, Nearly Headless Nick, Sir Properly Decapitated-Podmore, Prongs, Scarhead, Mad-Eye, Padfoot, Snuffles, Madame Maxime, Olympe, Big D, Crookshanks, Mr Paws), general appearance (Pretty-Boy Diggory, Fleur Delacour, Marvolo Gaunt, Merope Gaunt, Boris the Bewildered, the Bloody Baron, Riddle-Harry, Riddle-Hermione, Boggart- Voldemort, Professor Boggart Snape, Dobby, Nagini) and the material the entity is made of (Dusty). The meaningful names referring to non-physical traits are difficult to categorize not only due to the number of possible groups, but also because some names incorporate the attributes of more than one category. The fifty-four proper names in question could, for instance, be divided into the categories of: occupation (Mr Magical Maintenance, Adalbert Waffling, Emeric Switch, Phyllida Spore, Arsenius Jigger, Newt Scamander, Vindictus Viridian, Ollivander, Cassandra Vablatsky, Cassandra Trelawney, Professor Sinistra, Professor Vector, Colonel Fubster, Rosmerta, Inigo Imago, Hippocrates Smethwyck, Libatius Borage, Bowman Wright, Death, Hermes), experiences (Harry I’ve-Faced-Worse Potter, Viktor, Sir Cadogan, Odo the Hero), behavior and personality traits (Cornelius Fudge, Voldemort, Severus, Dolores, Narcissa Malfoy, Draco Malfoy, Madam Pince, Mr Brilliant, Little Miss Perfect, Lupin, Moony, Scabbers, Ludo Bagman, Bellatrix, Xenophilius, Xeno, Slytherin, Serpent-tongue, Ripper, Sanguini, Moaning Myrtle, the Wailing Widow, Peeves, Wendelin the Weird, Barnabas the Barmy), destiny (Karkus, Bane) and sheer metonymy (Mrs Number Seven, Mrs Next Door, Grawp).
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Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Narrative Brought to Life: The Wizarding World of Harry Potter

It is often the aura and authenticity of an object that will draw crowds or tourists, who want to see the real thing and experience the aura of the original. 130 According to Cornelius Holtorf, in his chapter “Authenticity,” in From Stonehenge to Las Vegas: Archaeology as Popular Culture, aura “is a property that resides in genuine artifacts and distinguishes originals from mechanical reproductions,” and the aura is derived from the object’s history. 131 In the case of the theme park, it is the object’s association with the real film set, the actors and the fictive world of Harry Potter that gives the props their aura. In a sense, the theme park can be said to be completely artificial, while simultaneously being completely authentic. This is because of the indexical and iconic trace that the props embody. When referencing the real movie set and the actors the objects have come into contact with, they are authentic. Yet, when guests see the objects as icons of things they know from the fictive and imagined world of Harry Potter, the objects are no longer seen as authentic, despite the fact that they are as authentic as materially possible. This means that although a certain magical object may not exist in real life, the replica prop is the closest it comes to being real.
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The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling  Young Adult Literature

The Harry Potter Effect: Understanding the Crossover Appeal of Bestselling Young Adult Literature

Undoubtedly one of the most notable, and perhaps most surprising, literary phenomena of the last fifteen years has been the explosive rise to popularity of a number of works of young adult literature. Most famously, the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling has inspired legions of fans ranging from very young children to adults in and beyond middle age to dress like wizards and witches, draw lightening bolts on their foreheads, and engage in spirited debate online and in bookstores and libraries across the world about the motives and merits of a cast of colorful human and inhuman characters. The series has smashed sales records: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the seventh and final book of the series, sold 8.3 million copies in a single day in July 2007 (Itzkoff, 2008); sales of the series in the United States total over 140 million copies (Memmott & Cadden, 2009), while worldwide sales total over 300 million copies (Maughan, 2007). Because Rowling’s books were dominating the New York Times Book Review’s bestseller list, the Book Review decided to begin a children’s bestseller list, in order “to clear some room,” NYTBR editor Charles McGrath reported (“’NYT’ to Debut Kids’ Bestseller List” 2000).
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Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references 
Harry Potter movies in arabic

Issues and strategies of subtitling cultural references Harry Potter movies in arabic

There are more magical creatures that have names which reflect their characteristics. For example, the term ‘Animagus’ refers to a very powerful wizard who can turn into an animal at will. The term is a combination of the word animal and the Latin word magus, meaning ‘animal wizard’. Other mythological creatures presented in Harry Potter movies are the ‘Cornish pixies’. They are small and bright blue creatures that are able to fly. Although Pixies are variously described in folklore and fiction, the etymology and origin of the name is uncertain and there is no direct ancestor of the word ‘pixies’. In the snapshot (41) below, the term ‘Animagus’ is preserved in the Arabic subtitle and transliterated as ‘سوغامينأ’. It is quite clear that the transliteration of the term would not be an obstacle for the target audience to understand the nature of the creature, because the term is explained by Hermione in the whole subtitle. However, some of the effect is lost because the target audience do not know the origin of the term and that it is a combination of two words.
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AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

AN ANALYSIS OF SPEECH ACT USED IN HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE MOVIE

Furthermore, the researcher wanted to know how important language used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire movie. Because based on the previous researches has been conducted before, the researcher found that the previous researches only focused on one function of speech acts such as directive only or commissive only without included about their forms and effects toward the listener. There were also not many types of research about Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire movie. Moreover, some of them did not include an explanation about the classification of speech acts itself.
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Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Portraying the Protagonists: A Study of the Use of Adjectives in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Thus, the present study was conducted to gauge the validity of whether character portrayal in the Harry Potter series could be the main reason in seizing the readers’ attention instead of marketing techniques done by global corporations. This study is done by analyzing three main protagonists in the final novel of the Harry Potter series which is the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. It incorporates two concepts which is stylistic analysis and corpus analysis, where the corpora of the final Harry Potter novel is analyzed based on these two approaches to study one linguistic feature, which is adjectives that was used by Rowling in describing the three main protagonists in the final novel. The results of the adjectives analyzed are then categorized into three smaller segments for easier scrutiny which are features, emotions and traits. Finally, from these results, the researcher analyzeswether the usage of the frequently recurring adjective could contribute to the depiction of protagonist as heroic characters.
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Demystifying Hogwarts: Good, Evil, and the Influence of Supernatural Figures in the Harry Potter Book Series

Demystifying Hogwarts: Good, Evil, and the Influence of Supernatural Figures in the Harry Potter Book Series

By attending the CTI Seminar "Supernatural Figures in Theater, Film, and the Brain", I have been able to expand my own core knowledge regarding the assimilation and understanding of the phenomenon that surrounds the creation of supernatural figures as an expression of inward psychological impulses and development. As a 3rd grade teacher, information gained from this seminar will serve a foundational basis to explore supernatural figures and phenomenon in current media that influence our youth today. The emphasis on these influences will be drawn from, and be applicable to, popular children's media outlets such as the literary series of Harry Potter and Percy Jackson, as well as youth film/literature like The Wizard of Oz and a variety of Disney inspired films. The ability to guide students in a more introspective analysis of how supernatural figures in these outlets are created and what they represent will expand comprehension skills in both the literal and inferential formats. By using supernatural figures that most students at my grade level are familiar with, it will provide a solid platform to bridge the gap in liberal arts education for students by offering a global perspective in: history, science, film, and literature. Students will also be able to benefit from a curriculum unit designed from this information by helping them to enhance critical thinking skills in responding to literature, encouraging abstract thought, as well as expanding on student's previously gained knowledge and enriching their understanding of how different cultures view, create, and are influenced by such supernatural figures.
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What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

What has Harry Potter done for me?:children's reflections on their 'Potter experience'

achievements, press headlines such as “Potter’s magic spell turns boys into bookworms” (Smith, 2005) and “The Harry Potter effect: how one wizard hooked boys on reading” (Laucius, 2007) make it appear that J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series has transformed children’s reading. These examples also highlight how media concerns about children’s literacy are gendered, focusing chiefly on boys. It is assumed in academia that boys are less enthusiastic readers than girls—. As international datasets highlight, this may translate into boys’ lower attainments than girls on measures of literacy (OECD, 2014; Moss, 2007). In the UK, early concerns about boys’ literacies intersected with anxieties about their overall educational accomplishments around the same time that Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Rowling, 1997) was published and widely taken up (see Hutchison, 2004; Jackson, 2003; Shepherd, 2011; Zyngier, 2009).
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Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Harry Potter and metaphysical hospitality

Despite attempts to give the books spurious deeper meanings, since the publication of the irst novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in 1997, the books have gained immense popularity, critical acclaim and commercial success worldwide, leading to ilms, video games, theme parks and merchandise. he seven books published have collectively sold more than 325m copies and have been translated into more than 64 languages, including Ancient Greek and Latin.22 he seventh and last book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was released in July 2007. Publishers announced a record-breaking 12m copies for the irst print run in the us alone.23 Reputedly, the success of the novels has made J K Rowling the highest-earn- ing novelist in history.24
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Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial
practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

Tensions between didacticism, entertainment and translatorial practices: deletion and omission in the Arabic translations of Harry Potter

findings of my study. However, the focus of my thesis is on reduction in the Arabic translations of the Harry Potter series which covers wide dimensions of deletion and omission. The deletions include summarisation, substitutions and economy while omissions include generalisation, transliteration and standardisation. Furthermore, the analysis of this study goes even further and not only extends beyond CSIs but a whole range of main narrative features of the Harry Potter series and that are not yet considered in the existing literature of translation studies in this detail. These narrative features include characters, plot points and events and, particularly in relation to characters, the study analyses the multi-faceted dimensions of deletions to characters and their roles. Moreover, this study addresses the whole series of seven books and its five translators by analysing selected chapters (first, middle and last) and thus allows broader comparison of translatorial practices and development. Finally, the analysis of this thesis also considers other elements such as editors, supervisors, publishers and readers.
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Mugglenet.com's Harry Potter Should Have Died: Controversial Views from the #1 Fan Site

Mugglenet.com's Harry Potter Should Have Died: Controversial Views from the #1 Fan Site

In this 21st centuries, people become competitive in every way. By being competitive currently, people have do something to make these people survives, being in the middle of the actual crowded place and notice simply by surrounding. One thing that occasionally many people have underestimated the idea for a while is reading. Sure, by reading a publication your ability to survive enhance then having chance to endure than other is high. For you who want to start reading some sort of book, we give you this Mugglenet.com's Harry Potter Should Have Died: Controversial Views from the #1 Fan Site book as beginning and daily reading reserve. Why, because this book is greater than just a book.
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Harry Potter   Rowling, J K   Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire   Book 4 pdf

Harry Potter Rowling, J K Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Book 4 pdf

Harry had been a year old the night that Voldemort -- the most powerful Dark wizard for a century, a wizard who had been gaining power steadily for eleven years -- arrived at his house and killed his father and mother. Voldemort had then turned his wand on Harry; he had performed the curse that had disposed of many full-grown witches and wizards in his steady rise to power -- and, incredibly, it had not worked. Instead of killing the small boy, the curse had rebounded upon Voldemort. Harry had survived with nothing but a lightning-shaped cut on his forehead, and Voldemort had been reduced to something barely alive. His powers gone, his life almost extinguished, Voldemort had fled; the terror in which the secret community of witches and wizards had lived for so long had lifted, Voldemort's followers had disbanded, and Harry Potter had become famous. It had been enough of a shock for Harry to discover, on his eleventh birthday, that he was a wizard; it had been even more disconcerting to find out that everyone in the hidden wizarding world knew his name. Harry had arrived at Hogwarts to find that heads turned and whispers followed him wherever he went. But he was used to it now: At the end of this summer, he would be starting his fourth year at Hogwarts, and Harry was already counting the days until he would be back at the castle again.
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