Health Education

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The Value and Implementation of Health Education in Finland

The Value and Implementation of Health Education in Finland

To do that, the core contents of health education are (1) growth and development (life span; physical, mental, and social health; special features of adolescence development; and care for one’s own health), (2) healthy choices in everyday situations (nutrition; smoking, alcohol, and other drugs; sexual health; human relationships; infectious diseases, illnesses; road safety; accidents and first aid), (3) resources and coping skills (health; work and work ability; emotions and expression of emotions; social support; interaction skills; crises of development and life phases), and (4) health, society, and culture (national diseases; environment and health; well- being at work; basic health care and welfare services; civic organizations; legislation about children’s and youngsters’ rights and limitations). Instruction of health education is based on the understanding of physical, mental, and social capability (Finnish National Board of Education, 2004).
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Health Education for the Elderly

Health Education for the Elderly

Health care personnel’s personal belief that elderly people have a poor understanding and learning ability has been an important obstacle in providing elderly people with an effective education. The myths about ageing have regarded elder people as unproductive, resistant to change, impotent and stereotyped individuals. In addition, health care personnel’s lack of knowledge and skill may often prevent them from seeing all behavioral symptoms. For instance, behaviors of an elderly person who suffers from a mental disorder due to dementia can be seen as manipulative, or an older person with impaired hearing may respond intricately or inappropriately. In these situations, elderly people are considered “difficult” or “complicated” by health service providers (Smith, 2006). Many elderly people, however, do not experience biological, psychological and socially excessive negative effects. Instead, for those who are physically fit and extrovert, social and psychological abilities continue. On the other hand, experiencing some changes may disrupt learning in the health education process. Below are the commonly seen changes that may affect the learning process in elderly people (Tabloski, 2010; Cornett, 2011).
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Health literacy as a challenge for health education

Health literacy as a challenge for health education

More broad and comprehensive conceptualization of health concept determines that the definition of health literacy has been broadened and become more comprehensive as well. The field of health literacy has expanded in its scope and depth [26]. The uncertainty about the concept of health literacy can be a challenge for health education. Today health literacy goes beyond its narrow conceptualization and is much more than an individual’s ability to perform basic reading, writing and numeracy tasks required for an adequate and effective functioning in the health care environment and settings [27]. New concept of health literacy means much “more than being able to read pamphlets and successfully make appointments” [16]. There is an assumption that health literacy should be considered not only as an individual issue, but also as a feature of intense and mutual reciprocity between personal health literacy, his or her health and wider social conditions and general environment [26]. Now health literacy includes more advanced and complicated skills needed to function, participate and communicate in health context, also to think critically, evaluate and use information, make informed decisions to achieve a greater control over health circumstances [16, 18]. World Health Organization insists that health literacy should become more complex, namely, an individual behaviour-oriented communication and collaboration should be combined with the environmental, political and social factors that affect individuals and public health [25]. To avoid “„blindness‟ to social aetiology of health and illness” [28], there is a need to supplement health education with more comprehensive understanding of social determinants of health. Health education, in this more comprehensive approach, should consider the complexity of health and social determinants of health – social, cultural, economic, political and environmental factors [26] influencing individual and community health context and health outcomes. The awareness of the social determinants of health can encourage and empower people and community for reasoned actions to influence and change these social, cultural, economic, political and environmental determinants of health [24, 25].
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Translational health research: perspectives from health education specialists

Translational health research: perspectives from health education specialists

A recent commentary [1] focused on diverse interpreta- tions and definitions of clinical and translational medicine. Health Education Specialists and health disparities researchers have a particular interest in translational health disparities research and community health. Health disparities have been defined as “systematic, plausibly avoidable health differences that adversely affect socially disadvantaged groups” ([2], p. S151). Health equity – the concept of social justice in health – thus involves addres- sing structural and societal barriers that get in the way of people being able to attain optimal health [2]. The integra- tion of a “social mission” perspective [1] among clinical translational scientists has been prioritized, and it is im- portant for our public health colleagues to consider their own role in the translational research process. The phrase “from bench to bedside to curbside” is a common defin- ition of translational research among health disparities researchers [3]. Health Education Specialists make
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The future of global health education: training for equity in global health

The future of global health education: training for equity in global health

Global health at academic institutions: a growth industry As the field of global health emerges as its own academic and clinical discipline, medical schools in the U.S. are positioning themselves by establishing or strengthening related programs, centers, and institutes [11]. These new entities are often charged with defining curricular and co-curricular opportunities, and their leaders are contributing to the discussion of competen- cies in global health [12–14]. An intraprofessional education committee of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health is providing important guidance in this area [15]. A few schools are also taking a lead in the effort to disseminate this information without barriers, as exemplified by the freely available Global Health Delivery cases published by Harvard Business School, the open-access training modules by Unite for Sight, and all-access syllabi, readings, and taped lectures hosted by various U.S. universities or their open courseware partners such as EdX and Coursera. By broadening access, these new offerings are additionally helping to level the playing field in global health education [16]. In addition, a growing number of low- and middle-income countries, including (among many others) China, Thailand, Mexico, Rwanda, and South Africa, are now establishing their own global health education centers and institutions [17, 18].
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Medical education: an Italian contribution to the discussion on global health education

Medical education: an Italian contribution to the discussion on global health education

INGHE is concerned about the actual organization of medical schools and aims to open a national debate on medical education, global health education and “ health education ” in a wider sense. As members of INGHE we believe that teaching global health means introducing a new way to think and act concerning health while “ aiming to produce change in the community and in the whole society, and bringing evidence into practice, thus reducing the know-do gap ” . This is the rea- son why INGHE, which began its work considering only medical educa- tion, recognises the necessity to take into consideration educational paths of the diverse professions involved in the safeguarding and pro- motion of health.
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ICT in Education: A Study of Public Health Education

ICT in Education: A Study of Public Health Education

Modern technologies such as Information Communication Technologies have helped many of the development sectors. One of the sectors it has lot of scope to develop is the Education. It is also evident from the experience that the benefits of these technologies have contributed much in the area of healthcare. However, these benefits come with few limitations. A technology is useful only if (a) the systems are designed keeping the user perspective mind, (b) if the users are trained on those systems, (c) users recognize the need for a system and (d) users feel there is a need for such system. Developing a system for an application does not necessarily lead to usage. Many developments ended without giving any benefit to society. For the better usage and the benefits, one has to have a commitment to promote the system among the appropriate users by demonstrating the benefits of such systems. This further discouraged by the restrictions imposed by the IPR regime. There is some relief now due to the popularization of the free software movements. This paper is an effort to highlight the benefits of such systems in public health education with special reference to the open source online tools. Author is a faculty of a Public Health school teaching health management course to the students of public health. The paper addresses the importance of ICT systems in training the public health professionals. It also discusses the benefits and limitations of such system. The present system is a complementary teaching method to the existing classroom teaching.
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19 - Health Education and Wellness

19 - Health Education and Wellness

 Our health education team is comprised of professionals dedicated to teaching people the skills needed for lifelong health. Staffed with a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES), Registered Dietitians (RD), Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE), Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LADC), and a team of individuals with a Master‟s Degree in Exercise Physiology and in Health Promotion, the Health Education and Wellness Division is designed to focus on both preventive care and the management of existing health concerns.
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SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION TOOLKIT

SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION TOOLKIT

implementation plan that works best for their school and staff. Principals should determine whether their school staff or an outside consultant will provide sexual health education instruction. Any school may retain the services of an outside consultant, who has been approved by the Health and Wellness Materials Review Committee (HWMRC) to supplement its sexual health education program or courses. If an outside consultant is unable to provide all of the components of sexual health education as outlined in the NSES, the principal must ensure that trained school instructors or another approved consultant cover the remaining topics to fulfill the CPS Sexual Health Education Policy requirements for instruction. A listing of approved providers and supplemental materials is provided during Sexual Health Education Training, can be obtained through the OSHW or
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HEALTH EDUCATION.

HEALTH EDUCATION.

Welshimer, Kathleen J., Associate Professor, Ph.D., Uni- versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1990; 1990. Com- munity organizing, women’s and children’s health, health psychology, community assessment and planning process. Wilken, Peggy, Clinical Assistant Professor, Ph.D., South- ern Illinois University, Carbondale, 1995; 1998. First aid and advanced first aid concepts, environmental health, sexuality, international health, emotional health and aging. Zunich, Eileen M., Assistant Professor, Emerita, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1970; 1967. ************************************************************************************************************************************************* The Health Education program offers a graduate program
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Health Education

Health Education

450-3 Health Programs in Elementary Schools. This course is designed to present key health-related concepts and skills to en- able teachers to deliver culturally-sensitive, developmentally- appropriate, standard-based instruction elementary students. It also will provide an overview of coordinated school health programs and their relationships to academic achievement. 461-1 to 12 Health Education Workshop. A different focal theme each year; e.g., mood modifying substances, ecology, human sexuality, emotional and social health dimensions. Information, ideas, and concepts are translated into teaching- learning materials and approaches; continuing opportunity for interaction between prospective and experienced teachers. 470S-3 Highway Safety as Related to Alcohol and Other Drugs. Relationship between alcohol and other drugs and traf- fic accident causes. A review of education programs designed to minimize drug related accidents. Restricted to advanced stand- ing or consent of instructor.
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Citizenship, Health Education and the Obesity ‘Crisis’

Citizenship, Health Education and the Obesity ‘Crisis’

to form around the ‘legitimised’ fat discrimination in the UK is part of a more widespread aim of rationing health care provision on the NHS. This will impact most on those who are least able to access the networks of economic, social and cultural capital in order to maintain their health. This is implicit in the notion of being a good, active citizen, meaning that the individual is faced with “millions of individual decisions, at millions of points in time” (Blair, 2006, 4). This is far from a simple process, however, since every single one of these decisions is influenced by a myriad of different facets ranging from friends and peers through to the family, the school and state delivered health messages. With such a multitude of possibilities the UK Government has felt it necessary to introduce Citizenship Education and health education in schools to enable individuals to make the ‘right’ choice (limited as that may be). The empirical material in this study has revealed that children still often choose not to follow this advice and often resist and subvert health education messages. The relationship between individuals and the state, although mediated through institutional spaces such as the family home, the school and the community, still allows for the agency of the individual in making certain decisions. Understanding how individuals negotiate this process of “structured individualisation” (Roberts, 1997; Valentine and Skelton, 2003) is the key to understanding why children do not always follow the advice given in state health messages.
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INTERPROFESSIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION (IPHE)

INTERPROFESSIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION (IPHE)

Student leaders as partners for change: Thousands of health professional students from across Canada came together in 2005 to form the National Health Sciences Students’ Association as a grassroots movement to champion interprofessional education. Drawing on a network of 22 university/college-based chapters and over 20 health professions, student leaders design and deliver local academic, social and community service programmes that promote collaborative practice. The Association’s University of Toronto chapter, for example, hosted a series of social events coinciding with the university’s interprofessional ‘Pain Week’ curriculum. The Dalhousie University chapter recruited hundreds of health professional students to participate in a breast cancer charity run while learning about, from and with one another. [italics added] The local chapter at the University of British Columbia partnered with its provincial Ministry of Health to coordinate innovative health programming for elementary and high school students.
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Health Education

Health Education

A brightly colored cosmopolitan is the drink of choice for the glamorous characters in Sex and the City. James Bond depends on his famous martini—shaken, not stirred—to unwind with after confounding a villain. And what wedding concludes without a champagne toast? Alcohol is part of our culture—it helps us celebrate and socialize, and it enhances our religious ceremonies. But drinking too much—on a single occasion or over time—can have serious consequences for our health. Most Americans recognize that drinking too much can lead to accidents and dependence. But that’s only part of the story. In addition to these serious problems, alcohol abuse can damage organs, weaken the immune system, and contribute to cancers. Plus, much like smoking, alcohol affects different people differently. Genes, environment, and even diet can play a role in whether you develop an alcohol- related disease.
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Health professions digital education on clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review by Digital Health Education collaboration

Health professions digital education on clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review by Digital Health Education collaboration

We also reported separately the change score data from the included studies. For continuous outcomes, we re- ported the standardised mean differences (SMDs) and associated 95% CIs across studies. Standardised mean difference was used as a summary statistic as the out- comes in the included studies were measured differently. We were unable to identify a clinically meaningful effect size from the literature specifically for digital education interventions. Therefore, in line with other evidence syn- theses of educational research, we interpreted SMDs using Cohen’s rule of thumb: < 0.2 no effect, 0.2–0.5 small effect size, 0.5–0.8 medium effect size and > 0.80 large effect size [23, 27, 28]. For dichotomous outcomes, we summarised relative risks and associated 95% CIs across studies. Subgroup analyses were not feasible due to the limited number of studies within respective com- parisons, and outcomes. We employed the random- effects model in our meta-analysis. The I 2 statistic was employed to evaluate heterogeneity, with I 2 < 25%, 25– 75% and > 75% to represent low, moderate and high de- gree of inconsistency, respectively [23]. The meta- analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 (Cochrane Library Software, Oxford, UK) [23]. We re- ported the findings in line with the PRISMA reporting standards [24]. We assessed and reported the quality of the evidence for each outcome, using the following GRADE assessment criteria: risk of bias, inconsistency, imprecision, indirectness and publication bias. Two au- thors independently assessed the quality of the evidence. We rated the quality of the body of evidence for each outcome as ‘high’ , ‘moderate’ and ‘low’. We prepared ‘Summary of findings’ tables for each comparison to present the findings and the quality of the evidence (Additional file 1) [29]. We were unable to pool the data statistically using meta-analysis for some outcomes (e.g. skills, behaviour) due to high heterogeneity in types of participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, out- come measures and outcomes measurement instru- ments. We presented those findings in the form of a narrative synthesis. We organised the studies by the comparisons and outcomes. We transformed the data expressed in different ways into a common statistical format. We tabulated the results to identify patterns in data across the included studies focusing on both the direction as well as the effect size where possible. In addition, we displayed all the available behaviour change outcome data in a forest plot without a meta-analysis as a visual summary (see Additional file 1). In some studies, behaviour was measured in the same study participants using different approaches and tools. Instead of selecting one outcome or producing a single estimate per study, we present all behaviour change outcome data from the included studies as it focuses on different aspects of cli- nicians ’ behaviour and practice [23].
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Relevance of Environmental Health Education

Relevance of Environmental Health Education

Hence it is important that as learners acquire new knowledge and skills, and as they develop their values and attitudes, relevant and high quality content on health and environment is of[r]

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Bachelor of Education (Secondary: Human Movement and Health Education)

Bachelor of Education (Secondary: Human Movement and Health Education)

ONE senior (2000/3000-level) unit in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (WORK)^ ^ For a full list of available units, please consult the Faculty of Education and Social[r]

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Health Education Division

Health Education Division

Medical assistants are multi-skilled health professionals specifically educated to work in ambulatory settings, performing administrative and clinical duties. The practice of medical assisting directly influences the public's health and well-being and requires mastery of a complex body of knowledge and specialized skills requiring both formal education and practical experience that serve as standards for entry into the profession. SCHEDULING AND ENTRY OPTIONS The Medical Assisting program is a full-time day program with courses in the major starting in the Fall Semester. Full-time students can complete the program in two semesters and a Summer Term. General Education courses are offered both day and evening and can be completed any time before program entry or in Fall Semester upon program entry.
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Physical Education/ Health Education/ Dance/Athletics

Physical Education/ Health Education/ Dance/Athletics

Controlled PE Activities (9 units selected as follows) Choose one course from each category Aquatics: 132ABC, 133, 134A, 137, 220 Fitness/Cardiovascular: PE 106AB, 112A, 138ABC, 139, 143A, 144ABC, 146, 147ABCD, 148AB, 149, 166, 168, 169, 176AB, 177, 178, 179, 195, 196, 224 Dance: PE 150ABC, 151AB, 152ABC, 153, 156 Combatives: 162A, 163, 164 Choose three courses from: Team Sports PE 120ABC, 121ABC, 122ABC, 124ABC, 125ABC, 126ABC, 127ABC, 219AB Choose two courses from: Individual Sports PE 101AB, 103AB, 109ABC, 226 AA Degree: Physical Education, Emphasis in Athletic/Personal Fitness Training The degree emphasis in Athletic/Personal Fitness Training prepares students to transfer to a four-year university and major in kinesiology, with an emphasis in Athletic Training or Sports Medicine. The practicum hours completed may count toward certification as an athletic trainer. Departmental Requirements (39-44 units) BMS 107 — Human Anatomy...............................................4
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> HealtH & Education <

> HealtH & Education <

“If 1,000 kids are attending a healthy school in which healthy choices are made easy for them and they’re registering that as being meaningful, then those kids are going home with that health message and over time they will embody it, car- rying it forward with them,” says Sorensen. “This proves that it’s possible to design for a real cultural shift over time.” Obesity Rate in Children (U.S.)

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