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Spiritual Dimensions of Indian Culture

Spiritual Dimensions of Indian Culture

In the medieval ages, Sanskrit became* “the language of pundits and expect for certain philosophical, religious and learned purposes no longer a first-hand expression of the life and mind of people.” The diversified version of the Ramayana- by Krittibas in Bengali and Kamban in Tamil,- Bhavartha Ram ayana in Marathi, Ranganatha Ramayana in Telegu, Adhyatma Rama-yanam in Malyalam, Rama charita Puranam in Kannada emphasized the need of disciplined life in a cultured society. The cult of devotion- Bhakti Marga- prevailed in India widely among the high and low. The Maharastrian saints Ramdas and Tukaram, the Tamil saint Tiruvalluvar and poetess Avvai gave a fillip to the moral and ethical upliftment of the masses in their respective regions. In Bengal the divine genius of Chaitanya and inspired verses of the two poets, Bidyapati and Chandidas, brought about a new awakening. In northern India the poet-saints Tulsi Das, Sur Das, Mira Bai, Nanak and Kabir gave a new dimension to the religious aspects of Indian culture. Also, there was a horde of Muslim Sufi- saints, the chief among them being Khwaja Muinud deen Chishti of Ajmer, who gave impetus, in their own way, to the spiritual fervor among the masses. In modern times, the surge of spirituality has undulated to its lowest ebb throughout the world owing to the rising tide of physical sciences, and in India due to the influx of the materialistic Western civilization also. Thus says Sri Aurobindo 7 . “Indian
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IMPACT OF ENGLISH INVASION ON INDIAN CULTURE

IMPACT OF ENGLISH INVASION ON INDIAN CULTURE

India is called the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history and the grandmother of tradition. India is a treasure of valuable materials and strong history. Indian culture is one of the oldest, dating back to more than 5000 years. Indian culture can be best expressed in terms of humanity, tolerance, unity, secularism, closely knit social system and a rich cultural heritage. A country that is highly reputed for its rich culture and heritage has undergone a massive change with the invasion of the British and English language into India. Since then India has not only given English prime importance it has also incorpo- rated into its culture, the cultures of many other countries that has diluted the essence of its culture by making way for a cross cultural setup. This research paper is an attempt to re-emphasize the glory and grandeur of Indian culture and tradition among youngsters of this land by bringing to the fore, the true meaning of our ancient practices and its practicality even in today’s modern world. In a time when foreigners are more attracted towards our rich culture and our youngsters mesmerized in westernization, there is an urgent need to understand that the need of the hour is to be a cultured human being and a proud Indian.
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The Impact of Media on Indian Culture, Values, Ethics and Behavioral Communication

The Impact of Media on Indian Culture, Values, Ethics and Behavioral Communication

Zee was launched in October 1992 and depended initially on recycled programming. It then broke television taboos by broadcasting programs about sex, relationships, and horoscopes. The channel thrives on a mixture of Hindi film, serials, musical countdowns, and quiz contests. Zee’s innovative programming includes news in “Hinglish”. Despite the influence of the English language in India, the biggest media growth is in regional languages. Even U.S. series like “Friends” (known as “Hello Friends” in India) have been hybridized, although the latter has not been as successful as expected—the lifestyle of the Hyderabadi versions of the New Yorker originals did not settle in the Indian imagination. Such television shows are the prime example of how American culture has become more popular in India than Indian culture.
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A STUDY OF FACTORS INFLUENCING SOCIAL WELLBEING OF BREAST CANCER PATIENTS IN INDIAN CULTURE

A STUDY OF FACTORS INFLUENCING SOCIAL WELLBEING OF BREAST CANCER PATIENTS IN INDIAN CULTURE

the patient it is considered rude and the patient and his/ her family might take it as an insult and neglect. The discussions and conversations during such visits primarily revolve around the illness being suffered by the patient. The repeated conversation about the pain does not ease the pain, and in fact aggravates the problem as the patient does not get a chance to forget or ignore the illness. Moreover many visitors contribute negatively by discussing various serious aspects of the illness which someone else they are associated with might have suffered. Such negative discussions cause a lot of mental stress and disturbance to the patient and his family. Moreover, such information scares the patient and increases his/ her anxiety. If a visitor is sensitive and has a therapeutic approach it greatly helps the patient in becoming optimistic about getting cured. Patients and their family do not understand how to cope with the stress caused due to such social norms and visitors. Here domestic responsibilities like cooking, nurturing of kids and many more considered as women’s liability. This creates worries and feeling of insecurity in women patients. Women don’t express themselves more in Indian culture. This also has an effect on their mind. All this variables create huge effect on their social wellbeing. Patients pass through different circumstances in life and with different age, marital status and education level they handle the situation in different ways. Age played a major role in the adjustment with distress. [9] Age, marital status are significantly related with quality of life of breast cancer women. [10] Age plays major role on fear of reoccurrence and self-efficacy of patients. [11] Young age Patients faced more distress than old age patients. This study analyzes the effect of different dimensions of social wellbeing on women patients of breast cancer in Indian culture across the age, education level and marital status.
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Leaves as dining plates, food wraps and food packing material: Importance of renewable resources in Indian culture

Leaves as dining plates, food wraps and food packing material: Importance of renewable resources in Indian culture

marketing. For example, design of popcorn buckets and leak proof soft drink glasses in movie theaters and multi- plexes is much needed (Singh 2018). Various governmen- tal agencies including forest development, rural development, tribal development, banking, small scale in- dustry, handicraft, textile and handloom sectors should coordinate with the stakeholders of the leaf trade for their participation in fairs, exhibitions, gift fairs and handicraft melas organized at local, state, national and international levels for market expansion. In addition to national mar- ket, a huge demand exists in international market for dis- posable, biodegradable leaf plates. However, the products should meet the stringent quality standards set by the regulating bodies. To sustain the practice of using leaf plates in our daily routine and discourage plastic plate usage; necessary regulations should be imposed by the government bodies including the state pollution control boards, local municipal corporations and gram pan- chayats. It should be made obligatory to use disposable leaf plates at restaurants, hotels, roadside eateries, can- teens, street food stalls, take away food joints, temples, gurudwaras, traditional feasts, religious feasts, wedding ceremonies, etc. Also, its use should be made mandatory in official meetings, gatherings and parties; and in govern- ment departments like railway catering, temple endow- ment boards, etc. For instance, meal known as Anna Prasadam is served daily to nearly 160, 000–200, 000 pil- grims at different locations of the temple by Sri Venkates- wara Annaprasadam trust run by Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanam. Law enforcement such as imposed ban on single use plastic definitely meets the Indian government directives of Swachh Bharat and Swasth Bharat missions launched by Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation and Ministry of Health, respectively. In addition, a chapter on leaf plates should be incorporated in the curriculum of the school children and college students to realize their importance and significance in Indian culture.
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"The home and the world" : representations of English and bhashas in contemporary Indian culture

"The home and the world" : representations of English and bhashas in contemporary Indian culture

set  around  this  era.  I  have  discussed  Seth’s   A  Suitable  Boy  briefly  earlier  in   this   chapter   and   in   the   introduction,   but   others,   such   as   Salman   Rushdie’s   Midnight’s   Children   and   Desai’s   In   Custody   also   engage   with   the   topic   of   language  at  their  very  core.  If  we  were  to  demand  a  one  word  answer  to  the   question:   “do   these   novels   sanction   the   “strong”   European   nationalism,   espoused   in   India   by   the   Hindi-­‐wallahs   and   other   proponents   of   mono-­‐ linguistic   nationalism—or   do   they   sympathise   with   a   less   regimented   wielding   of   language?”   the   simple   answer   would   be:   neither.   Following   Srivastava,   while   the   novel   is   endowed   with   the   ability   to   represent   the   differing   views   on   any   topic   by   dint   of   its   dialogic   structure,   the   Indian   English  novel  does  not  adopt  the  rigid  nationalism  of  Hindi-­‐wallahs,  but  they   do   display   full   awareness   of   the   iconicity   of   language   in   relation   to   nationalism.   In   fact,   I   would   argue   that   the   ethos   that   the   Indian   English   novel   endorses   is   a   variant   of   “non-­‐linguistic”   nationalism   (that   was   not   centred  around  a  single  language,  culture,  or  community)  epitomised  by  one   person:  Jawaharlal  Nehru.  
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The Soft Power of Indian Culture

The Soft Power of Indian Culture

In the field of medicine and surgery, Sushruta was perhaps one of the first cosmetic surgeons of the world. His epic work Sushruta Samhita, is all-inclusive, including its most famous part outlining the technique for repairing and recreating a nose that is known today as reconstructive rhinoplasty. His technique for rhinoplasty featured a free-flap graft and the use of a piece of skin from other parts of the body to graft it on face skin with a small bridge of tissue to correct the look of the person, was nothing but the modern day “plastic surgery” and which was widely practiced in 6th century BC in India. Sushruta Samhita was first translated by the Arabs around the 8th century after which it traveled to Europe. By 1400, Sushruta’s techniques were apparently being practiced by surgeons in Italy. But it was in the 18th century during the colonial period that the technique of free-flap graft was rediscovered by Western medicine when the East India Company surgeons, Thomas Cruso and James Findlay, witnessed Indian rhinoplasty procedures at the British Residency in Poona and carried the knowledge back with them. A British surgeon named Joseph Constantine Carpue read about the procedure,
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Khetarpal’s Voice of Poetry Defends Indian Culture and Its Glory

Khetarpal’s Voice of Poetry Defends Indian Culture and Its Glory

The Greek poetess, essayist, novelist, short story writer and journalist, Kaperdeli Eftichia, has minutely, patiently and extensively studied poems of Dalip that she shares in her Preface of Sculptured Psyche (2017). The collection of poems is absolutely an excellent penetrative study of various realms…narcissistic, social, religious, educational, philosophical, psychological, poetic self-knowledge, destiny or destiny of “sister souls.” There are two things, ‘soul and conscience’, must be preserved and protected as these matter much, humanity’s position as a civilized being is dominated in relation to the purely pure human nature of “as the soul and conscience’ and its integration “into the system” into the social group that is recruited to serve the identity of culture which ends with the “corruption” of the soul. Nothing can save one from becoming Netanyahu, Donald Trump, Yezid, Maviya and other such figures witnessed in the land of Rama and Ravana, combined. It is, however, essential to mention that this book consists of 20 poems such as ‘A Parody of God’s Expertise’, ‘How fanciful God resides in human psyche’, ‘Soul-mate’, ‘A priest disconnects God’s call’ and ‘Indian sub- consciousness, a reflection of Western Consciousness’ and rest 15 others attract and startle as if they give a new found land with some innovative ideas and thoughts.
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REVISITING HER STORIES: WOMEN, EMPOWERMENT AND INDIAN CULTURE

REVISITING HER STORIES: WOMEN, EMPOWERMENT AND INDIAN CULTURE

The 21 st Century is an era of rapid and rhythmic progress. No wonder, the women folk, who have endured gruesome atrocities in the dark and dismal pages of history, have bounced back with exceptional fortitude and unusual strength of mind. Their resolve to stand at par with their male counterparts bears testimony to their achievements in various fields beginning from Pandita Ramabai (Founder of Arya Mahila Samaj), Swarnmukhi Devi (the first writer-editor), Savitri Phule(started the first school for girls in the subcontinent) to Tarabhai Shinde (who wrote the first Modern Indian Feminist Text, Stri Purush Tulana), Kamini devi (the first woman honours graduate), Sarla Devi Chaudharani (founder of India‟s first woman organization “Bharat Stree Mahamandal”) and Saroj Nalini Dutt (who pioneered the formation of Educated Women‟s institutes in Bengal).
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Study of Importance of Mahabharata in Indian Culture

Study of Importance of Mahabharata in Indian Culture

Mahabharata is the story of a family feud that ultimately leads to division of property and a terrible war. Ramayana narrates the tale of a family that struggles, and triumphs, over forces that seek to divide it. Quite naturally, a traditional Indian family terrified of any disruption of the family fabric prefers Ramayana over the Mahabharata. As I write these lines I wonder if Dhirubhai Ambani let the Mahabharata be read in his house or was the division of the Reliance Empire between his two sons simply the natural way forward. Man struggles to keep things together. Yet everything falls apart. Is the collapse of unity and order nature’s way? Is the aspiration for unity and cohesion merely a cultural dream? Is Mahabharata an expression of reality and Ramayana the imagination of a poet? Most people think so. Ramayana is too idealistic; Mahabharata is more realistic, they say.
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Place of Buddhist art in Indian Culture

Place of Buddhist art in Indian Culture

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DIMENSIONS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN INDIAN CULTURE

DIMENSIONS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN INDIAN CULTURE

An undeniable fact is that the companies have a responsibility towards the society and its stakeholders and shareholders. This fact has been made compulsory under the Companies Act, 2013 also where wealth maximisation does not remain the sole goal of the companies for their shareholders. The companies have to think about various people including employees, suppliers, customers, banks and other lenders, regulators, the environment and the community at large. Today’s business world, involves all these players from the entire world due to globalisation and everything being online. So the need is to contribute companies share for social purposes. It is a way of giving back to the society by distributing a particular portion from their profits. In India, there are many firms which are engaged in CSR activities and the Ministry of Corporate Affairs has come up with voluntary guidelines for firms to follow. The amendments under the Indian Companies Act 2013 with mandatory laws has created a balance between what the companies are earning in terms of profit and what it is
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CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY- AN IMPACT ON INDIAN CULTURE

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY- AN IMPACT ON INDIAN CULTURE

The companies have on an aggregate, identified 26 different themes for their CSR initiatives. Of these 26 schemes, community welfare tops the list, followed by education, the environment, health, as well as rural development. Corporate Social Responsibility in India is finally a „reality‟. Indian businesses realized they have to look not only at the economic dimension of their company, but also at its ecological and social impact – the three pillars of CSR. However, to become a planned strategy integral to business success, Indian companies have lot of catching up to do. CSR is also linked to the broader issue of “Corporate Governance. Needless to emphasize that Indian companies have to take a closer look at CSR and link it to corporate governance, if they really want to make a mark in all the three pillars of CSR. Further, according to a study by financial paper, The Economic Times, donations by listed companies grew 8 per cent during the fiscal ended March 2009. The study of disclosures made by companies showed that 760 companies donated US$ 170 million , up from US$ 156 million in the year-ago period. As many as 108 companies donated over US $2,16,199, up 20 per cent over the previous year.
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Environmental Consciousness and Strategy in Indian Culture: A View

Environmental Consciousness and Strategy in Indian Culture: A View

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Positive Value of Ancient Indian Culture and World Literature

Positive Value of Ancient Indian Culture and World Literature

The extent of Thoreau's reading of Indian literature is astounding. He read Jones' translation of Shakuntalam; Wilson's translation of the Sankhya Karika and of Vishnu Purana: Wilkins' translation of Harivamsa (which he later put into English) and Garcin de Tassy's Histoire de la Litterature Hindoui et Hindostan. In his Journal, he wrote: "One may discover the root of an Indian religion in his own private history, when, in the silent intervals of the day and night, he does sometimes inflict on himself like austerities with stern satisfaction." No wonder Gandhi loved and revered him and accepted Thoreau as his teacher. In another time and place, he would have been considered the ideal Yogi-ascetic, seeker after Truth.
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Epic Ramayana: Sociological Thought, Culture & Ancient Indian Science

Epic Ramayana: Sociological Thought, Culture & Ancient Indian Science

Ramayana had found in non-Indian Languages, such as Chinis, Cambodian, Indonesian, Filipino, Thai, Burmese and Malaysian etc. Another wondering thing is that, year after year and poet’s after poet are describing the story of Ramayana in their own verse and own style till date. So there are many poets of Ramayana had found in the history of Indian literature. But one thing has to be remember that the poet Valmiki was the pioneer writer or the first collector of stories of the Ramayana as known. Beside story telling the poet also described the natural and geographical, sociological, historical and cultural eliments of ancient India. So his Sanskrit Ramayana had suggested not only the story of Indian myth but also clarified the old Indian culture philosophy and historical parameter. We are all known that in ancient period of Indian history there is a rich culture of our society and nation. In Valmiki Ramayana we have seen such many facts and wisdoms which were scientific in nature. Truely this epic is based on ancient indian historical facts and movements.The hero of the Ramayana is Rama. He is not only a character of Ramayana, but also an hero of Indian civilization. Like Krishna, Rama is also the popular deities worshipped in the Hindu religion.
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A River Separates Them, A Culture Connects Them:  The Mohawk Hunters of Algiers and the Mardi Gras Indian Tradition in New Orleans

A River Separates Them, A Culture Connects Them: The Mohawk Hunters of Algiers and the Mardi Gras Indian Tradition in New Orleans

Although the Mohawk Hunters are considered the first Mardi Gras Indian tribe on the West Bank, they are not the only tribe on the West Bank, which was a title Chief Casby and the Mohawk Hunters’s held with pride. One of the members of Casby’s Mohawk Hunters was Troy Young. Young is about the same age as Casby’s oldest son who was also a member of the Mohawk Hunters. Young was Second Chief of the Mohawk Hunters but assumed that he would never become big chief with Casby’s son waiting in line. In 2014, Young decided to start his own Mardi Gras Indian tribe, the Algiers Warriors 1.5. This would become only the second actively running Mardi Gras Indian tribe in Algiers. Currently there is some tension between the two tribes, and most of the time they do not parade at the same events. Casby feels the way that Young left, without Casby’s blessing, was disrespectful, and it should have not been done in that manner. This is similar to what happened with the tribe members who wanted to split with the group and paraded on the East Bank in 1968 and were never let back into the tribe. In Mardi Gras Indian culture, disrespect and not following the rules of the culture are not tolerated. At the present time, the Algiers Warriors do not participate in the West Bank Super Sunday but they do participate in the Uptown Super Sunday, which is located on the East Bank. 29
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Indian-American self-representation : transmission of culture through the entertainment medium of film

Indian-American self-representation : transmission of culture through the entertainment medium of film

Grouped together, as they were meant to be seen, these scenes reflected conflict and unity; they also represented Kris’s rejection or acceptance of Indian culture. It was clear, however, that these alternating juxtapositions of American and Indian signs conveyed symbolic systems of two distinct cultures. This was done in a purposeful (and beautiful) manner not only to quickly relay two disparate cultures in a short period of time but also to emphasize Kris’s blatant self-separation from his Indian culture. To further accentuate this self-imposed removal, an additional juxtaposition was introduced – Kris’s white friend Eric. The character Eric served as a way for the viewer to gauge Kris’s interest and knowledge of Indian culture. When Eric came to Kris’s room so they could leave for college, Kris said, “Let’s hurry up and get the hell out of here before my mom starts all that religious crap” [sics ‘voodoo’ movement with hands]. During the aarti 82 , Eric smiled while Kris impatiently rolled his eyes. Eric initially forgot that he was wearing a tikka 83 while Kris immediately wiped it off before driving off to college. As one who was more curious than Kris about Indian culture, Eric liked the food, the smell of which Kris despised, and had no qualms about taking money (a form of blessing) from Indian elders. Whereas viewers may have suspected that Eric would be the one who found these Indian rituals alienating, such juxtapositions between Eric and Kris visually
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Culture of Sustainability and Marketing Orientation of Indian Agribusiness in implementing CSR Programs—Insights from Emerging Market

Culture of Sustainability and Marketing Orientation of Indian Agribusiness in implementing CSR Programs—Insights from Emerging Market

However, the adoption of the corporate culture of sustainability raises a number of fundamental questions. For example, do sustainability firms have better stakeholder engagement? Does their information dissemination system differ? Could meeting other stakeholders’ expectations come at the cost of creating shareholder value? Some argue that companies do well by doing well (Godfrey 2005; Margolis et al. 2007; Porter and Kramer 2011). This claim is based on the belief that meeting the needs of stakeholders other than shareholders directly creates value (Freeman 1984; Porter and Kramer 2011). It also reflects the belief that not meeting the needs of these stakeholder can destroy shareholder value, for example, through customer boycotts (Sen and Bhattacharya 2001), an inability to hire the most talented people (e.g., Greening and Turban 2000), and punitive fines by the government. These consequences will have negative impact on the economic sustainability of firms. Hence, the firm must avoid engaging in activities that are not in the interest of its stakeholders. On the contrary, when the firm meets the need of its stakeholders it gets support for its activities. However, the firm must address the long-term interest of its stakeholders in order to protect and strengthen the economic sustainability of firms.
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COMPARISON OF PCR AND CELL CULTURE FOR HUMAN ADENOVIRUS DETECTION IN GASTROENTERITIS AND RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTED NORTH INDIAN CHILDREN

COMPARISON OF PCR AND CELL CULTURE FOR HUMAN ADENOVIRUS DETECTION IN GASTROENTERITIS AND RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTED NORTH INDIAN CHILDREN

Usually, culture takes 2–14 or more days to yield results, and therefore, its clinical value is limited. To overcome these limitations, more rapid and modern molecular diagnostic techniques, such as PCR is a sensitive, specific, and rapid technique as compared to traditional cell cultures technique 16 . HAdV was detected by comparing the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the cell culture technique with PCR technique using degenerate primers for the conserved region of partial hexon gene 17 . The diagnosis of HAdV disease has traditionally been performed by cell culture techniques, but this technique has a lower sensitivity than PCR technique. Cell culture lacks the sensitivity for detecting low levels of circulating viruses and may require weeks to deliver definitive results 18 . Molecular diagnostic assays offer advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, and the ability to quantify viruses 19 . The present study emphasized comparing cell culture and PCR techniques for the diagnosis of HAdV infections in children with gastroenteritis and acute respiratory tract infection in North India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study is a cross-sectional hospital-based study. A total of 1270 samples (537 AGE +733 ARTI cases), collected from clinically suspected children attending outdoor (OPD) and indoor (IPD) clinics at Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and pediatric department of King
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