Love and Death

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THE THEME OF LOVE AND DEATH IN AUROBINDO'S EPIC 'SAVITRI'

THE THEME OF LOVE AND DEATH IN AUROBINDO'S EPIC 'SAVITRI'

The versatile poetic genius of Sri Aurobindo has found its perfect expression in the famous epic 'Savitri' .It is the highest poetic achievement of Sri Aurobindo. He was a great spiritual person and spirituality is the foundation of Indian culture. Sri Aurobindo has presented the theme of love through the character of Savitri. Savitri has been shown the symbol of ideal weeded love. She carries within herself the power of Divine love .All true humans have this Divine element in it .Love is that embodiment of the external in Time which carries with it the stamp of immortality .Sri Aurobindo presents the victory of love over death. The debate between Savitri and the Lord of Death is unique in itself. The colloquy between Savitri , love , Divine incarnate and Death is among the most inspired utterances of world's poetry. Its main theme is conquest of love over Death which has been the dream of man from the dawn of his existence. Savitri fulfils this dream by defeating the lord of death Yama.

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"Teaching Romeo and Juliet in and against Modern  Popular Culture"

"Teaching Romeo and Juliet in and against Modern Popular Culture"

heartbroken as well. In fact both Springsteen and Knopfler present their Romeos as the kind of adoring, lamenting lover he appears to be in the opening act of Shakespeare's play, and their Juliets can be seen as cruel-hearted women akin to Shakespeare's Rosaline. Both songwriters seem to imagine the possibility of a tragic-free romance for Romeo and Juliet, if only Juliet could somehow recognize her true Romeo on "Point Blank," or realize, on the Dire Straits song, that their problem "was just that the time was wrong." Perhaps responding to the increasing independence and agency of women in the late 1970s, Springsteen and Knopfler revise the nature of Shakespeare's tragedy: love and death are not inevitably connected here, but tragedy of a different kind is nevertheless located in Juliet's choice of someone other than Romeo. Springsteen and Knopfler define tragedy as the absence of romance. In contrast to Blue Öyster Cult, they find nothing tragic in the conflation of love and death; rather, they situate tragedy in the supposedly errant desires of young women.

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The Weight of Love

The Weight of Love

not even death is able to separate them. Although the story does not seem to end happily ever after for Romeo and Juliet individually, the gravity of their situation causes two feuding families to stop fighting and consider each other’s perspective, bringing peace to a town ravaged by violence. This Shakespearean classic has been told, interpreted, and adapted thousands of times, each with its own unique style and rhetorical situation. One of the most recent versions which puts its own spin on the tragic love story is Stan Lee, Terry Douglas, and Max Work’s graphic novel, Romeo and Juliet: The War, which places Romeo and Juliet at the forefront of two militaristic families vying for power in an advanced, futuristic world. While it may not seem to be overtly religious, Romeo and Juliet: The War can relate in many ways to the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. For instance, different types of light illustrated in the graphic novel contrast the power of love to the destruction of violence. Love is shown to develop out of existing hatred, which it eventually overcomes. The idea of Romeo as a Christ figure also emphasizes his stewardship for creation, shown when he decides to make the ultimate sacrifice. These themes are highlighted in the opposite way by the blind rage that the two families have for each other and their continued violence. Throughout Romeo and Juliet: The War, the importance of searching for the truth by engaging in dialogue with others is emphasized both through Romeo

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Ugly Love

Ugly Love

It’s funny how sound figures into memory more than the other senses. When I remember my dad, the image of him is tainted by the old photographs Mom keeps lying around: a younger, happier man, long before he became “Sheriff Tool” to everyone else, that I never knew. He wore a cheap cologne that I’ve never caught scent of since his death, something they probably don’t make anymore. I don’t remember touching him. I imagine his skin felt something like leather or the skin of an elephant, but it was so long ago. It’s always sounds that remind me the most of him—the sound of static, just like the old CB he tuned in his truck; the clanging of metal on metal, just like the old handcuffs he kept hanging from his rearview mirror, handcuffs he claimed he never had to use in all his years as a cop. And finally, one more sound, one I heard on that fishing trip he took with me when I was ten, a sound I know I’ll never hear again.

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Love in Postscript

Love in Postscript

chummy little old bird down the street for tea and her ever so dry scones. It’s different when you don’t see death, when he doesn’t grin in your face and show you just how powerless you are, how inevitable your own doom is yet again. Death was a bloody bastard, and she had never wished as badly to beat him in his smug face as she did when everything crawled into slow motion. 

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The hidden life of love: The function of the Bible in Kierkegaard’s ‘Works of love’

The hidden life of love: The function of the Bible in Kierkegaard’s ‘Works of love’

It is often said that Kierkegaard uses the Bible to illustrate his own ideas. Considering the number of pages about only a part of a verse of the Gospel: ‘each tree is known by its own fruit’ (Lk 6:44), we could reason that they have a point. Kierkegaard starts with the very interpretation that the subject of this sentence is love. The direct context of this biblical verse, after all, seems to be more morally oriented, due to the use of terms like ‘good’ and ‘rotten’ or ‘evil’ (see Lk 6:43–45). But this does not alter the fact that the central theme of the Sermon on the Mount is a love that extends to our enemies and those who hate, curse and mistreat us (Lk 6:27–35). It is within this context of a call to a radical love that does not seem to worry about one’s own position, that the Gospel of Luke admonishes us not to leave this path in order to defend ourselves or to judge others (Lk 6:37). Love has its own logic and can only be followed when we recognise its inner voice as our guide. In other words, love can only grow in us when we believe in the wisdom of its divine source and do not try run away from it when this love confronts us with the threats of the world. This may be sagacious from a human point of view, but it is disastrous from the perspective of love, that only has the possibility of revealing its hidden wisdom if we are prepared to submit ourselves its divine authority (Lk 6:46). It is within this context that the Gospel speaks of ‘good’ and ‘rotten’ fruits. We may be doing nothing wrong and acting as good citizens, when our first priority is to safeguard our own life and to take this perspective as our one and only basic assumption. It will probably help us to become prosperous in a material sense. From the perspective of God’s love, however, we will have signed our own death warrant, because this self-concern will exclude us from this hidden source of life that asks us to take the risk of trusting its divine foolishness. Accordingly, Kierkegaard speaks of a ‘conceited sagacity’. Objectively, it may seem wise to safeguard our life against the threats of the world and foolish to trust this naked ground of our existence that calls us to a life of selfless love, but, as Paul says: ‘the wisdom of the world is foolishness with God’ (1 Cor 3:19) and in order to enter this divine reality of our life, we have to leave behind our own sagaciousness.

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Effects of a “silent mentor” initiation ceremony and dissection on medical students’ humanity and learning

Effects of a “silent mentor” initiation ceremony and dissection on medical students’ humanity and learning

Objectives: Many medical schools in Taiwan have adopted a dignified “silent mentor” initiation ceremony to strengthen student’s medical humanity and increase their learning attitudes. This ceremony consists of introduc‑ tions of the body donor’s conduct and deeds, wreath‑laying, and a tea party. However, few empirical studies have examined the influences of the ceremony and dissection on medical humanity. This study explored if the initiation ceremony and the course can help students care more about others, develop more positive attitudes toward death, improve learning effectiveness in the course, and decrease negative emotions the first time they see a cadaver. Methods: The Attitudes Towards Death and Love and Care subscales of the life attitude inventory, Learning Effective‑ ness of Gross Anatomy Laboratory Scale (LEGALS), and Emotional Reactions Towards Cadavers Scale were adopted to examine differences before (T1) and after (T2) medical students attended an initiation ceremony at a university in northern Taiwan. Whether these effects lasted to the end of the semester (T3) was also tested.

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Love Is Not an Emotion

Love Is Not an Emotion

When society comprising millions of people assumes this type of relationship to be love, the terrible consequence is that the biological image of love gradually fades and is substituted by its cultural namesake. For women, e.g., an analysis of single-words descriptors of “love” revealed six distinct definitions of love, interpreted as “attraction, passion & romance”, “unconditional love”, “sex & fun”, “friendship & spirituality”, “a permanent commitment”, and “separate people, separate lives” (Watts & Stenner, 2014). Although it has been attempted for thousands of years to link sex to love, pri- marily for reasons of political and religious control by the dominant groups (Burunat, 2014a, 2014b), the reality is that sexual activity should only be understood as part of the whole love experience, but sex is not necessary either in the manifestation or in the course of love.

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Ontology of Love

Ontology of Love

Against Augustine‟s position, Lewis argues that man cannot love God if he does not love his brother as reflected in epistle of St. John (1 Jn.1:3). Augustine's statement, he laments, will turn out to be rather an escapist‟s position. Lewis rhetorically asks: Does God provide the assurance? If so, Christ would not have cried: “why have thou forsaken me?” There is no safe investment in love. Love anything Lewis concludes and your heart will certainly be possibly broken. To remain intact then one must avoid entanglement. Give your heart to no one and to nothing. But no man can actually exist without the other. The desire for the other is an existential necessity which an “existentential vacuum” naturally creates in man. Herein lays the paradox of human existence. However if Charity is essentially God's love and supernatural, it means then that man has nothing to do with it. How does man participate in such a love? For Lewis, "God communicates to man a share of His own gift-Love. This is different from the gift-Love God builds into nature. While the latter is pre-occupied with the gift they themselves can bestow or that fits into their pre-conceived picture of the life they want to lead, Divine gift-Love on the contrary is love Himself working in a man, wholly disinterested and desires what is simply best for the beloved. It enables man to love what is not naturally lovable like a leper, criminals, enemies, maroons, the sulky, the superior and the sneering. Finally, by a high paradox God enables man to have a gift-love towards God. Ironically, man‟s gift-Love with regard to God is just a reverse, giving back to God that which is God's; just as a song is the singer‟s. Another way of giving to God is by giving to our neighbour, a stranger or anybody in need. .

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A Re Interpretation of African Philosophical Idea of Man and the Universe: The Yoruba Example

A Re Interpretation of African Philosophical Idea of Man and the Universe: The Yoruba Example

Theistic humanism would be a humanism that accommodates the love (value) of God or the worship of God. But it would be like denying the power of God and at the same time accommo- dating it. If this is the case, one needs to ask, if humans can solve their problems, what role would God play? The answer perhaps can be that God would be responsible for giving human beings inspiration on problem solving or that he would serve as an umpire, to see which human being is doing or not doing the job of salvaging the common heritage (universe). The bible says that a time is coming when God would deal with the de- stroyers of the universe. But one can ask, is receiving inspira- tion from God not the same as taking order of: thou shall or thou shall not...from him? Western Philosophy mostly ex- plained this by making allusion to human intuition rather than saying that God is responsible for this inspiration. So, to them, both human intellect and intuition are enough to solve human problems rather than making recourse to a God or gods. But to the average African man inspiration comes from God or the gods.

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Celluloid love: audiences and representations of romantic
love in late capitalism

Celluloid love: audiences and representations of romantic love in late capitalism

Why is the background blurred in a scene where A and B are about to kiss for the first time? Is there a reason behind the fact that the female lead is seldom taller than the male lead? Is it random happenstance that intimate moments on screen are lighted with a warm, yellow side light? This list of questions might have very different answers, pertaining to contexts of both production and reception. Few elements in commercial cinema are left to chance; a controlled environment is after all one of the key differences between cinema and ‘real life’. Then, the hundreds of choices behind a full commercial feature that begins with a script and ends with its release can be seen as a unity of conscious decisions of what to show, and ergo, of what to hide, exclude or ignore. Film scholars who focus on melodrama have pointed out several prominent elements in these films: thematic music, close up shots, triangular desire based plots, internalization of conflict, and an ambivalent relation to realism (Doane, 1988; Gledhill, 1987; Vincendeau, 1989; Williams, 1998). However, the popularity of melodrama as a genre has partly paved the way for other (sub) genres like ‘chick-flicks’, rom-coms and ‘indie’ films that adapt, follow and borrow these elements without using them prescriptively. Further, as Neale and Krutnik (1990) argue, the resilience of the romantic film, drama, comedy and drama- comedy is due to the adaptability the subject of romantic love has to historic changes. It is necessary to look how historic changes affect representations of love on-screen and how people, who experience these changes in and out of the film, negotiate, and

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Dancing between anger and love: Reflections on feminist activism

Dancing between anger and love: Reflections on feminist activism

While Martha Nussbaum’s insight and detailed explanation of anger is extraordinary, her utilization of the word ‘love’ and the emotion of ‘love’ is much more fuzzy. She tells us that this is the emotion that will bring us justice and wellbeing; however, she never sets up to conceptualize this properly. She exemplifies what she means by love with speeches and historical events taken from the lives of three impressive political leaders: Gandhi, Mandela and King. The descriptions of how these three personalities in their own ways approached injustice are deeply inspiring, but personally I was left with the impression that while I had received some very well-structured arguments to support the rejection of anger and practical examples of how to overcome such a ‘trap’, I had not received a clear analysis of what is love and how are we to nurture love. Instead love seems to be an amalgam that includes hope, compassion, empathy, courage, cooperation, friendship, generosity, lightheartedness, kindliness, humor and humility among other aspects. This resembles mostly a list of how to be a good human being – a mix of virtues and emotional states – more than a clear analysis of the emotion of love.

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Love as Attunement

Love as Attunement

? It grounds and demarcates the everyday being-with-one-another of Dasein , without which we are unable to speak of the disclosedness and attune- ment of love. Being-with-one-another, originary to the ontological circularity of being-with, grounds the coexistence of Dasein , in which Dasein is be- ing-with-for-the-other as well as for the sake of the other. Why is it that in coex- istence being-with is able to understand and free being for the other? Because being-with is solicitude, the disclosedness that precedes the understanding and grounds the freedom of being for the other. What allows us to correlate be- ing-with to the attunement of love? The fact that “it is in attunement that Dasein discovers itself freed and exposed to being.” (Greisch, 1994: p. 180). It is in be- ing-with that Dasein discloses itself to the other, but it is in the attunement of love that Dasein is able to effect the encounter with another Dasein through the understanding and freedom of being for the other.

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Peace Club - Section 3 - Grief - Lower Primary.pdf

Peace Club - Section 3 - Grief - Lower Primary.pdf

Children process their grief and loss at their appropriate age level. This is why grief follows us throughout our lives. If a parent dies when a child is small, the child will grieve with their limited understanding of death. When they are a bit older and understand the permanence of death, they may grieve again. When the child graduates and that parent is not there to see this accomplishment, the loss resurfaces again and so might the painful emotions. These lessons will not heal the pain of various losses but the hope is that it will give words and tools to the children to help them

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Love founded in God: The fruits of love in Kierkegaard’s ‘Works of love’

Love founded in God: The fruits of love in Kierkegaard’s ‘Works of love’

As pragmatic people we normally do not question the origin of our work, for our first interest is the outcome. No matter what our motivation is to give to charity, money is money and it will not change its value, whether it is given out of love or not. For Kierkegaard though, love has a side we easily tend to forget because it cannot be objectified to something we see or do. This hidden reality of love may seem insignificant, but is decisive for the quality of our actions. Charity given as a kind of obligation is not comparable with a love that really cares for the other. The donor and the receiver senses the difference very well, because it is immediately felt in the reality of the heart. Accordingly, works of love demand self-knowledge. In order to become obedient to the voice of love we have to become familiar with the interior of our heart and the different movements that can be found in it. The paradigm of Luther shows us how difficult this exercise is. The more we enter the reality of our heart, the more we discover how distracted we are and how much we are motivated by voices other than love itself. Love, as a form of reciprocity in which the other immediately moves us, is a rare event. Most of the time we will find in ourselves a kind of double-heartedness in which we are only partly motivated by the other. Love in the scriptural sense, however, asks for a total surrender. Here Kierkegaard quotes the Gospel of Matthew in which Jesus instructs us: ‘when you do merciful deeds, do not let your left hand know what your right hand does’ (Mt 6:3). This impossible task from our human point of view can only be understood as an expression of the immediacy of love. The moment we are really moved by love, we no longer live in ourselves, but in a kind of self-oblivion, in which we are entirely moved by God as the divine source of our love.

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Challenges in Finding Metaphorical Connections

Challenges in Finding Metaphorical Connections

We focus on creating intentionally meaningful lines of poetry. Poems generated from a single theme such as “love” can rely on language related to the theme, but are often ambiguous and have no clear meaning. Although ambiguity can be a desirable property in poetry, it makes it difficult to evaluate whether the meaning is intentional, or being attributed by the reader. We propose gen- erating poetry from a metaphor such as “love is a rock”. These poems can still have some ambigu- ity, but we can evaluate whether readers can detect

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When love drives you off the trails: narratives of morbid love

When love drives you off the trails: narratives of morbid love

Lack of self-respect is manifested in the person’s way of ignoring his/her own needs and thinking that the only thing that matters is the other’s contentment. Sophia et al.,’s (2009) study supports this finding: individuals who are more attached and dependent on others and those naturally more prone to anxiety and concern over punishment are more likely to engage and maintain disturbing relationships, due to fear of loneliness and abandonment. Thus, self-esteem seems to have the key role. People who are provided with healthy self- esteem are able to pay attention to their human dignity but are also interested in other people, especially their loved ones. Furthermore, it leads to respectful behavior toward others. The love scale is in balance when the person accepts and appreciates himself/herself but can also tolerate and appreciate intimacy without the fear of becoming left alone or hurt. Healthy self-esteem, finding one’s resources and development toward greater self-expression in intimate relationships is necessary for finding fulfillment in life and balance in love (Määttä and Uusiautti, 2012a,c) and yet, love is not just about one person: it is about respecting the other person and finding the mutual understanding (Määttä and Uusiautti, 2012d; Uusiautti and Määttä, 2011). Thus, it is relevant to think how to define intimacy and closeness. Harvey and Pauwels (2009, p. 385) define closeness as “mutual satisfaction and behavior that contributes to one another’s goals and hopes in life.” Harvey and Pauwels’ closeness describes quite well the equilibrium in the scale model presented in Figure 1.

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From Room to Tomb: Moonlight

From Room to Tomb: Moonlight

Andy yearns for Bridget. He wants to see his imaginary grandchildren to give them his blessing. Bel sits frozen as Andy talks of his poor grandchildren, about “to lose their granddad […] when the door was about to open on new ever-widening and ever-lengthening horizons” (Pinter 1998, 327). Bel tries to comfort him with the thought that death is his new horizon, but Andy plays anxiously with her image: will he cross the horizon as he dies or after he is dead, or will he perhaps stay stuck in the middle of it? He pictures the weather in the horizon, “If it’s pitch black for ever what would have been the point of going through all these enervating charades in the first place?” (Pinter 1998, 358). He hopes there is a loophole through which he would crawl and meet himself coming back: Like screaming on the brink of death, Pinter’s people have nothing to cling to but words, their ambiguities and associations.

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Love Sip

Love Sip

was turned down by the faculty review committee because of their concern that it could not be finished in a year. Also, the main idea was not clear and convincing. After discussion with Stephanie, I realized it was too risky to make a realistic style animation with a profound story. So, I started to work on another script for the second proposal, with a more relaxing and straightforward storyline. In the meantime, I wanted to keep true to an idea that reflects some truth about life. And, this was the starting place for find the idea of Love Sip.

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Snakey love

Snakey love

something really cool or something you are interested in, it can be a style, it can be a movie, etc. Using his method I can quickly assemble a main structure of a story by just simply making connections between key words, then put them into those questions that I just asked myself, and combine them all into a paragraph. After this process, I felt more confident about what kind of story I should make. Finally I came up with an interesting idea of a poor lizard, which loses his legs to an accident then becomes a snake-like creature and falls in love with a beautiful snake.

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