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Inclusion in education through music: the perception of Brazilian educators and music therapists

Inclusion in education through music: the perception of Brazilian educators and music therapists

The music when used in the work with individuals with ASD has provoked effective improvement according to the participants. This assertion is corroborated by studies that have proven that these activities have a direct relationship with areas of the brain, linked to emotions and language and are used not only in the skills as in the interaction and socialization of individuals with ASD (Kohler et al., 2002; Molnar-Szakacs and Overy, 2006). Still in the case of most who agree with the fact that musical activities are of great value in the intellectual, behavioral and affective development of people with ASD, the verbalization of one of the PM that a student to discover that he liked to play a Musical instrument had a more accentuated learning development is in total consonance with the study by Lai et al. (2012), since for these authors the functional system of people with ASD is more engaged to music than to the discourse, Thus signaling the advantage of using this resource with these individuals. Analyzing the socio-demographic profile of the study participants, we can say that they are predominantly female, with age range between 25 and 45 years; Teachers of basic education, music and education professionals have a public institutional link, and musicians have a private relationship and a higher level and have worked in the area for over 16 years. It can be inferred that due to the fact that the study participants have a considerable professional experience and a higher level of education, that the reports they have brought are rich in musical experiences of many years with children and adolescents both in Formal education and non-formal environments. One of the advantages pointed out by the PE for the use of musical activities with students with ASD is due to the fact that for these participants the musical stimulus enables
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A general overview of the history of music education in turks

A general overview of the history of music education in turks

Hoca houses, societies, or student choirs, individually or collectively made up of musical personalities, began with the teachings of music instructors in the Ottoman Empire teaching at home, taught to the palace car- ers' homes. Enderun'da not only for the music, but also for the male and female children, outside the hocalar was also tasked. After the 17th century, female students began to be sent to the homes of hocans for the study of verbal works in great form with difficulties in learning and long-term reeds (especially ney and cag). After the closing of Mehterhâne and Enderun (later the monks), this piece became a necessity. (Huzma Arif, İsmâil Hakkı, Rifat, Hoca Kazim (Uz), Abdulkadir (Töre), who gave private Muslims in their homes or in a suitable locale under the names of Mûsikî- yi Osmanî, Gülşen-i Mûsikî, Dârü'l-muskî, Terakkî-yi Mûsikî), Kanunî Nazim, Udî Fahri (Kopuz) and Ali Salahî Bey, continued the way that Bolahenk Nuri Bey (1834-1910) opened for the first time. At the forefront of the associations established for both education and concert are the Dârü't-talîm- i Muskî Society, which runs between 1916 and 1931, which completes the first collective performance records of the Ottoman music and also gives serious concerts both at home
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Popular music meta-pedagogy in music Teacher education

Popular music meta-pedagogy in music Teacher education

In this chapter we discuss issues surrounding the training of secondary school classroom music teachers in England and share some findings from a small- scale action research project. In order to prepare beginning music teachers to teach music lessons which have value and are meaningful to a broad range of young people, it is important to include pedagogies for popular music as part of initial teacher education. International modalities for initial teacher educa- tion differ significantly between jurisdictions, but however they are conceived, Shulman’s (1986) notion of pedagogic content knowledge features as an important element. Pedagogical content knowledge for popular music is a relative new- comer to the toolkit of the classroom music teacher despite the importance of popular music to young people and the broader community outside schools. Popular music deserves separate consideration from other types of musical stylistic learning, in particular because it has no long history of pedagogy (Mantie, 2013), and expertise can be gained without formal musical tuition (Green, 2002, 2008).
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USE OF MUSIC AND ARTS IN EDUCATION AND BRAIN BASED LEARNING

USE OF MUSIC AND ARTS IN EDUCATION AND BRAIN BASED LEARNING

According to the Children’s Music Workshop, the effect of music education on language development can be seen in the brain. “Recent studies have clearly indicated that musical training physically develops the part of the left side of the brain known to be involved with processing language, and can actually wire the brain’s circuits in specific ways. Linking familiar songs to new information can also help imprint information on young minds,” the group claims.

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"It's Obvious Who Plays an Instrument and Who Doesn't": Using Doxa and Illusio to Explore Inequities in English School Music Education

"It's Obvious Who Plays an Instrument and Who Doesn't": Using Doxa and Illusio to Explore Inequities in English School Music Education

school. He also mentioned that the timing for such a change had been serendipitous since it coincided with the national changes to GCSE grading systems and the removal of levels at Key Stage 3 (McIntosh 2015; see Fautley [2010] for a discussion of how the old national curriculum levels impacted music curriculum and assessment). Teachers were therefore encouraged to replace graded learning objectives with reference to challenge and courage. Labels for sub-groups such as Gifted and Talented, Pupil Premium and SEN/D were also made less prominent in discussions about classes and individual children, with the preferred focus being sufficient opportunity for all students. It is apparent, therefore, that the assistant headteacher was consciously trying to change the illusio of the school field in order to better equip the students for greater success in the field of power. As the data below demonstrate, the students were often aware of how this illusio had been constructed and communicated, yet they rarely demonstrated conscious awareness of how their habitus or capital might limit opportunities to transfer capital accrued in the school field to other situations. Although the school field had transformed to portray a more positive illusio that sought to increase intrinsic motivation and cultural capital, many of the participants continued to be disadvantaged in the national field of music education (and in the field of power) by their rurality and lack of economic capital.
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A new paradigm in music education: the Music Education Program at The Australian National University

A new paradigm in music education: the Music Education Program at The Australian National University

The intractable nature of an individual’s self-perception can be both puzzling and amusing. One particular example serves to illustrate this problem, but there are many variations on the theme. A teacher came to the first session of a course I was running (Journal 20). She walked up to me as soon as she arrived to say that she couldn’t hold a tune at all and was this course for her? I said absolutely it was. In the first session she, like everyone, sang on her own. Her degree of accuracy in singing a typical Music Education Program song was well within the bounds of the acceptable, even though the song was new to her. Given the teacher’s opening question to me, I initiated a discussion in the group about personal vocal perception to illustrate how wide the discrepancy can be between our own perceptions and those of others. Children, on the other hand, seem to be the opposite if they do not encounter a judgemental environment too early. They sing automatically and do not question their accuracy. They do not even seem to contemplate the question of whether or not they have a fine singing voice. It would appear to be like considering whether one’s speaking voice is ‘good’ or ‘not’ rather than a tool to allow for communication.
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From Communism To Democracy: Choral Music Education In Czechoslovakia (1948 – 1992) And The Czech Republic (1993 – 2011) as Experienced by Four Prominent Czech Musicians

From Communism To Democracy: Choral Music Education In Czechoslovakia (1948 – 1992) And The Czech Republic (1993 – 2011) as Experienced by Four Prominent Czech Musicians

Historically, music education, and especially choral singing, has held a unique place in the educational system of the Czech Republic (formerly Czechoslovakia). Since the first church schools were established in the 6 th Century, music always held a place as one of the paramount subject disciplines, a description of which is outlined in Chapter Two. While the history of the Czech lands has been turbulent, two of the most interesting times have been the periods beginning in 1948, when Czechoslovakia first came under the domination of the Soviet Union, and then after 1989, when the Velvet Revolution provided the catalyst for the transition from communism to democracy that led to the dissolution of the union between the Czechs and Slovaks. In 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully divided into two independent countries: the Czech Republic and Slovakia. This study of the history of choral music education in the Czech Republic and former Czechoslovakia deals with the historical era between 1948 and 2011—the latter was the year in which the first Czech president of modern history, the poet Vaclav Havel (b. 1936-2011), died. Ultimately, and while of necessity, this study commences with an examination of choral music education within Czechoslovakia following World War II and leading up to the dissolution of the country in 1993, its primary purpose is to generate a picture of choral music education in the Czech lands between 1948 and 2011 so as to better understand how it was influenced by, while also being implicated in, national and regional politics and events.
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USE OF MUSIC, DANCE, DRAMA AND ARTS IN EDUCATION

USE OF MUSIC, DANCE, DRAMA AND ARTS IN EDUCATION

Where have the arts in education gone? Over the past several years we‟ve all seen the trend of schools cutting the arts from their curriculum. Music, art, theater—gone for so many. Some parents, teachers and students look down on arts education as something unimportant, especially when compared to academic subjects such as language, math and science. However, the value of arts education should not be underestimated because it can actually provide several benefits for the students.

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Assessing affective elements in New Zealand secondary school general music education: The development of a music attitude assessment instrument based on a taxonomy of affective educational objectives

Assessing affective elements in New Zealand secondary school general music education: The development of a music attitude assessment instrument based on a taxonomy of affective educational objectives

ASSESSING AFFECTIVE ELEMENTS IN NEW ZEALAND SECONDARY SCHOOL GENERAL MUSIC EDUCATION: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MUSIC ATTITUDE ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENT BASED ON A TAXONOMY OF AFFECTIVE EDUCATION[r]

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Music Education Training for Teachers

Music Education Training for Teachers

In the perspective of the meetings with music teachers, characterized by the courses of Musical Education, it was observed the great relevance of its organiza- tion and effectiveness, especially given that they were directed to music teachers, or teachers with musical knowledge. This direction allowed the discussions to focus on specific issues, which these professionals are aware of. It is not ex- cluded, here, the relevance of conducting training in Music and Musical Educa- tion with professionals from other areas, not least because this is a great com- mitment in the process of insertion of music in schools, with which is commu- nized at the present time. However, there are situations where specificity should be addressed. And, it is understood, this was developed in these courses, which allowed to be treated the principles of Musical Education (2003), in its specifici- ty, in a reflective perspective (Schön, 1987, 1995, 2000). In this regard, one of the participating teachers declared:
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INTEGRATION OF ART, MUSIC AND DRAMA IN EDUCATION

INTEGRATION OF ART, MUSIC AND DRAMA IN EDUCATION

The need of the integration of performing art in teacher education curriculum is a new focused toward learning without burden. The Kothari Commission Report of 1964- 66 emphasized that “in an age which values discovery and invention education for creative expression acquires added significance. Adequate facilities for the training of teachers in music and the visual arts do not exist. The neglect of the arts in education impoverishes the educational process and leads to a decline of aesthetic tastes and values”. The National Policy of Education 1986 emphasized that the important school education is to foster understanding of cultural and social system of different parts of the country. Follow up taken in 1986 and program of action prepared in 1992 and mentioned cultural perspective interlinking education promotes personality development and helps to enhance potentialities of the child. It is also supported in the three previous National Curriculum Framework(NCFs)of 1975,1988 And 2000 that to encourage and arouse students curiosity it is important to the principle of the teaching is focused on drama, music and drawing etc. Paradigm shift toward the art education integrate in school curriculum.
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Analysis of the Communication Levels of the Students Studying in Music Education and Preschool Education in Terms of Music and Different Variables

Analysis of the Communication Levels of the Students Studying in Music Education and Preschool Education in Terms of Music and Different Variables

Music; joy, sadness, etc. it is an important tool in expressing emotions, recognizing different cultures, and communicating socially and culturally, but it is a cultural resource and a scientific research area(Babacan, 2011). Music, feelings, thoughts, impressions and designs, and other facts with the contribution of certain situations, facts and events, a certain purpose and method, according to a certain understanding of beauty by combining, processing and explaining with formatted sounds is an aesthetic whole. It is the only language that everyone can understand and understand (uçan, 2005). Music is considered as one of the most effective and important tools that should be used in the education of All children and it is seen as an important tool that affects the language development, emotional and social development of children positively (canakay, 2006; yıldız, 2002).
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The Value of Music in Children’s  Enlightenment Education

The Value of Music in Children’s Enlightenment Education

Physiologist and doctors believes that orderly rhythm, soft and beautiful music can cause of harmonic rhythm of the circulatory and respiratory, human body biological rhythm which affects children’s growth and development and health modulation. Modern scientific research has confirmed that music can stimulate the activity of the brain cortex, and has a direct impact on the edge system and brain stem reticular formation, regulate brain func- tion, promote the development of brain and sensory organs, improve children’s ability of thinking and imagina- tion, enhance and restore memory, and promote the development of intelligence and improve. In addition, music can also help balance the development of the left and right hemispheres of the brain. Music activities can make the left and right hemispheres of the brain communicate with each other and coordinate with each other. Foreign research found, that the excellent music class students, their math class is also very good. Music can also be very effective in improving children’s imagination and creativity. Einstein grew up with music and music education, and lifelong indissoluble bound. He was 6 years old when he was able to play a musical instrument, and when he went to the Soviet Union, he was holding a violin in his hand. Einstein once said: “the music world has given me the intuition that my new discovery of the moving object has a great help” [13].
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Tropical sounds: a cultural history of music education in Cairns and Yarrabah: 1930 to 1970

Tropical sounds: a cultural history of music education in Cairns and Yarrabah: 1930 to 1970

Music education programs produced by the Queensland Department of Public Instruction from 1912 were based primarily on British procedures and attitudes. They called upon the enthusiasm of teachers, rather than their musical skills and knowledge, to implement music instruction. While there was some music training for trainee teachers, it was not cohesive or adequately resourced and supported in schools. The training of teachers in music before 1930 was overseen by the Lecturer in Music at the Teachers’ College at Kelvin Grove in Brisbane, Mr George Sampson. Sampson published a “Queensland Teacher’s Manual of Music” in 1912 which detailed his purely theoretical course of instruction and was largely concerned with teaching music in primary schools. There was no practical application in it for trainee teachers to develop their musical skills to teach in the classroom. The school inspector’s report of 1925 verified the unintended outcome of Sampson’s syllabus: “The teaching of singing among teachers of smaller schools is not popular . . . even those teachers fresh from the Training College evade teaching it.” 476 Through most of the first half of the 20 th century, the prevailing attitude towards formal music education in Queensland was that it was not regarded as worthy of serious study in schools; specialist music teachers were not appointed until 1944. Higher level music study was viewed as a difficult, remote and secretive skill in which only a certain type of student could engage. It would most likely be in the form of private instruction where outcomes were validated through external examinations and competitions, also modelled on English structures.
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The Biography of Music Teachers, Their Understanding of Musicality and the Implications for Secondary Music Education

The Biography of Music Teachers, Their Understanding of Musicality and the Implications for Secondary Music Education

If it is part of the purpose of music education to develop young musicians 43 (The Music Manifesto, DfES, 2004), then issues arise which spring from the debate which has been highlighted earlier in this thesis as to precisely what or who a musician actually is. The definitions range form anyone who is engaging in musical activity (Jaffurs, 2004) to those who are considerably more skilled as composers or performers (Rogers, 2002; Fletcher, 1989). This thesis concerns the relationship between a music teacher’s experience and education (their biography) and how this impacts on classroom practice. Wrapped up with this relationship is the hypothesized understanding that biography can influence beliefs and values - our identities - especially (for the purposes of this thesis) in regards to what it is to be a musician and what musicians need to learn, and that these values in their turn, will also impact on the nature of what is taught (or not) in the classroom (Dolloff, 1999; Welch et al, 2011). This current research has been of an exploratory nature which has grown out of the day-to-day work of an ITE tutor at work with his trainees and observing music teaching and learning in schools – both of his trainees and their teacher-mentors. It has sought to gain some insight into these relationships and to postulate what some of the implications for current practice on the potential for developing musicianship in young people might be. In attempting to explore these relationships, it is clear that one approach to research will not be sufficient but that a multi-faceted methodology will be necessary as the investigation will range from observation of classroom practice to interviews which will seek to delve into participants’ life-histories, to a wider survey of beliefs and value systems across a wider population. Four research methods have been the principle sources of data for this study: sorting activities (in the form of two single-question surveys), survey in the form of a questionnaire, observations of teaching, and interviews.
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‘BME’ Perspectives on Music Higher Education

‘BME’ Perspectives on Music Higher Education

• So, my contribution to this panel is a series of quite personal (as requested; 5 mins) reflections on how I got from where I was then to where I am now, and what this reveals about the workings of privilege and the intersection of various kinds of identity and difference: gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, religion, and so on. Because although I may have been disadvantaged and felt marginalised by my gender and ethnicity - the two most visible aspects of my identity and I just introduced myself in those terms – they were ultimately trumped by class and by my access to music education. Without that, it’s unlikely that I would be here today. Yes, I experienced racist taunts at my primary school in the early 70s; as the only ‘child of colour’ in the school, I got the inevitable ‘Paki, go home’. But I was also the only girl from my year to go on to grammar school and the privilege that came with that (a privilege denied my fellow ‘white’, largely working class, classmates).
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Creative use of Technology in Elementary Education in Music Education

Creative use of Technology in Elementary Education in Music Education

Over the last decades, the role of technology shifted from being a tool to make survival easier to a communication and entertainment platform [1]. This change of the role of technology has impact on education as well. All education is based on providing information and doing exercises to develop a certain skill. From doing exercises skills can be improved and further developed. In elementary education most teachers are general teachers, this means that they are teaching most or all subjects in a specific grade. It can lead to insecurity when they provide exercises for a subject that they are not fluent or confident in. Music is taught differently on most schools, but with the technology that is available nowadays, it can be implemented in multiple ways to fit and support the education currently given at any school.
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Music, movement and drama in early childhood education: an assesment of the moi university case

Music, movement and drama in early childhood education: an assesment of the moi university case

Childhood, 1999). According to MENC, the National Association for Music Education (2010), music is a natural and important part of young children's growth and development. Early interaction with music positively affects the quality of all children's lives. Successful experiences in music help all children bond emotionally and intellectually with others through creative expression in song, rhythmic movement, and listening experiences. Music in early childhood creates a foundation upon which future music learning is built. These experiences should be integrated within the daily routine and play of children. In this way, enduring attitudes regarding the joy of music making and sharing are developed. According to Connors (2009), when one listens to the singing, the laughing, and the shouting; the jumping, stomping, and clapping... children making music, it’s easy to hear they’re having fun. Children, unlike adults, learn primarily through sound. They naturally focus attention more easily on sound than on visual stimuli. The rhythmic sound of music, in particular, captures and holds children’s attention like nothing else, and makes it a valuable learning tool. Music education increases children’s intelligence, academic success, social skills, and even physical fitness.
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Music Assessment in Higher Education

Music Assessment in Higher Education

Leung, Wan and Lee [15] developed a study to identify the parameters for assessing musical compositions, and how assessment can aid students’ learning. The study included three composer-assessors and six undergraduate music students. An assessment tool for the evaluation of the music students’ compositions was established on both the macro and micro philosophies of assessing music compositions. Composers selected had experience in tea- ching composition at the beginning level. The composition students were in-service music teachers studying mu- sic education. None of them was a composition major, but they were expected to teach composing in schools and assess their students’ composition assignments. The results indicated that both macro and micro aspects of as- sessing musical composition were significant but the assessors put more emphasis on the micro skills. This is because the “macro” was an interpretative aspect, requiring more “artistry” and was easier to rate high. The “micro” or “technical” aspect is fundamental to music composition, which there is clear, objective evidence of composi- tional techniques, making it more difficult to rate high. Constructive feedback served to help students to improve their musical works, and this tool was proven to be an effective device in assessing music composition.
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MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE FIELD OF

MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE FIELD OF

important issues.. Already, students of three music departDents in Adult Education have kindly co-operated by completing this same questionnaire. Institritions within t[r]

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