music education

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Music education

Music education

In common with other subject areas, the middle stages of secondary Music education will be divided into a Preparatory year (S3) and a Course year (S4), proceeding from the ‘broad general education’ in Expressive Arts in S1 and S2. The design and structure of the Preparatory year will be at the discretion of schools and colleges, facilitating the development of Music programmes that refl ect localised strengths and expertise. In the Course year, students will study at one of three levels: National 3 (broadly equivalent to Foundation/Access under the existing structure), National 4 (General/Int 1) or National 5 (Credit/Int 2). Regardless of level, students will complete three units: Performing Skills, Composing Skills and Understanding Music. All will be internally assessed with external verifi cation from the Scottish Qualifi cations Authority. On satisfactory completion of these modules students will proceed to assessment for the course award comprising a recital on one or more instruments in ensemble and/or solo context. Performance will be assessed by school music staff at National 3 and National 4 level, and by a visiting assessor at National 5. Notably, the performance examination will have a broader scope than has been the case and will include elements of refl ection on repertoire and personal development. National 6, replacing the existing Higher level, retains the features of its predecessor. Additional minor developments include a revised concept list (forming the basis of the Understanding Music unit) and an emphasis of content over duration in the Composing Skills unit.
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The Biography of Music Teachers, Their Understanding of Musicality and the Implications for Secondary Music Education

The Biography of Music Teachers, Their Understanding of Musicality and the Implications for Secondary Music Education

If it is part of the purpose of music education to develop young musicians 43 (The Music Manifesto, DfES, 2004), then issues arise which spring from the debate which has been highlighted earlier in this thesis as to precisely what or who a musician actually is. The definitions range form anyone who is engaging in musical activity (Jaffurs, 2004) to those who are considerably more skilled as composers or performers (Rogers, 2002; Fletcher, 1989). This thesis concerns the relationship between a music teacher’s experience and education (their biography) and how this impacts on classroom practice. Wrapped up with this relationship is the hypothesized understanding that biography can influence beliefs and values - our identities - especially (for the purposes of this thesis) in regards to what it is to be a musician and what musicians need to learn, and that these values in their turn, will also impact on the nature of what is taught (or not) in the classroom (Dolloff, 1999; Welch et al, 2011). This current research has been of an exploratory nature which has grown out of the day-to-day work of an ITE tutor at work with his trainees and observing music teaching and learning in schools – both of his trainees and their teacher-mentors. It has sought to gain some insight into these relationships and to postulate what some of the implications for current practice on the potential for developing musicianship in young people might be. In attempting to explore these relationships, it is clear that one approach to research will not be sufficient but that a multi-faceted methodology will be necessary as the investigation will range from observation of classroom practice to interviews which will seek to delve into participants’ life-histories, to a wider survey of beliefs and value systems across a wider population. Four research methods have been the principle sources of data for this study: sorting activities (in the form of two single-question surveys), survey in the form of a questionnaire, observations of teaching, and interviews.
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Music Education Assessment Requirements and Review

Music Education Assessment Requirements and Review

instruction is designed to allow students to obtain the knowledge of traditional and current methodologies and standards in music education, with the ability to adapt to new and innovative ideas and to function in an increasingly complex technology-based society. Music courses, private and group instruction, and ensemble participation assist in the development of musically proficient, self-motivated graduates.

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MUSIC EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON

MUSIC EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON

Individuals follow a prescribed program based upon the music education courses listed in Track I. Note that in the Post B.A. Track no 100 or 200 level courses from the major can apply. At first glance it may be seen that, since all Music Education courses taught at University of Massachusetts Boston carry a 300 or 400 level designation, we are unaffected, however, students transferring into the program from other universities will find that Music Education courses bearing a 100 or 200 level designation at their previous institution may not be counted in the Post B.A. Track.
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INCLUSIVE MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC

INCLUSIVE MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC

Consistent exercitation of the positives of curricular reform in primary art schools is however often blocked by economical and (thence it´s followed by) professional defections. Average materially-technical equipment of schools (rusty musical instruments, didactic and computing techniques and other teaching aids) is well below the European standards and precludes consequent realization of actual reforming conveniences. However, in spite of the lack of financial capital, Slovak graduates of primary art schools produce excellent results in national and foreign artistic competitions with European prestige. In transformation of music education in primary art schools, there is still need to reissue or to publish new textbooks of musical theory for higher year-classes and to ensure musical audio CDs corresponding with particular lessons in textbooks, let us say offer variability of teaching materials. In conceptual intention of artistic schools it is possible to observe the tendency to adapt to parents´ requirements demanding the establishment of new bearings in musical field (e.g. guitar playing, keyboard playing, improvization, electronical processing of sound record), but without competent personal assurance. Trend of compromise has negative effect on the quality of teaching and on absence of musical-pedagogical research and grant activities of primary art schools (Bresler, 2007). Partly downtrend to decreasing professionality in teaching is surely the result of elimination of individual approach thanks to new economical, sociological and legislative situation – in primary art schools as well as in universities in the programs preparing future teachers of pre- primary, primary, secondary, and for still existing artistic education.
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Music Education Professors’ Beliefs Regarding  Essential Musical, Academic, and Emotional Skills in Undergraduate Music Education

Music Education Professors’ Beliefs Regarding Essential Musical, Academic, and Emotional Skills in Undergraduate Music Education

completing an undergraduate music education degree. A conventional content analysis was used to examine the data with key words noted from participants’ responses. When participants included more than one skill in their response, the key word assigned was that which seemed most emphasized by the participant. When a most emphasized word was not clear, the first key word of the response was used and the remainder of the response was discarded. This was done in an attempt to reduce the effect of verbose responses receiving more weight than succinct responses. In some cases, the example that the participant chose to describe in the final portion of the survey helped clarify their initial response. As themes began to emerge from key words, similar themes were combined into larger categories. These larger categories were established as the coding system, which was then reapplied to the original data using a directed content analysis. Musical Skills
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DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF MUSIC EDUCATION, CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PHILIPPINES

DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF MUSIC EDUCATION, CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PHILIPPINES

Conservatories should realize the importance of an effective and quality administration system and apply the necessary developments needed to strengthen Thai conservatories to international standards. Public and private colleges should apply developments in the administration of their music education to produce quality and professional graduates of music so that they can apply the knowledge and talents successfully in their future and professions. The Office of Higher Education Commission and the Ministry of Education should apply the knowledge from this research study in creating standard measure in ensuring quality control and certification of conservatory administration.
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Creative use of Technology in Elementary Education in Music Education

Creative use of Technology in Elementary Education in Music Education

Every class in elementary schools gets music education, in the first four grades the children mainly sing, dance and sometimes make music, also listening to music is to teach children about contradictions in music, for example high-low(pitch), loud-soft(volume) etc. The education is quite often connected to fairy tales or stories or situations the children can easily relate to. Every lesson is about a different musical attribute therefore each lesson has its own goal. Those goals can be found on the website of the SLO, an association for the development of curriculums for education (primary, secondary and special education). During those lessons children should be able to work individually as well as being able to work or perform together with the whole class, since this would be good for the bond within the class.
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INFORMAL AND PARTICIPATORY CULTURES IN MUSIC EDUCATION. Informal and Participatory Cultures in Music Education: Pitfalls and Possibilities

INFORMAL AND PARTICIPATORY CULTURES IN MUSIC EDUCATION. Informal and Participatory Cultures in Music Education: Pitfalls and Possibilities

knowledge and a socio-cultural context for our experiences (Hodges, 2005). Many youth are able to be involved in participatory cultures, where musical learning occurs easily and without formal intervention, through the development of complex technologies that allow interaction and sharing across the world without the limitations of geographical boundaries. Musical activities are a significant part of many young people’s everyday lives, as they are musically encultured from a young age, yet the majority of their musical participation occurs outside of formalized music education (O’Neill, 2005), through informal learning within popular music (Green, 2007). Contemporary music educators are faced with finding ways for youth to strengthen the connections between music education at school and their musical experiences outside the school walls; and I posit that an understanding of
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Merton Music Education Hub Business Plan. Merton Music Foundation. Inspirational music education for ALL... Updated: September 2015

Merton Music Education Hub Business Plan. Merton Music Foundation. Inspirational music education for ALL... Updated: September 2015

The availability of these live music opportunities are well publicised to schools, parents/carers and students, and there are regular features on our website at www.mmf.org.uk. We also use social media and RSS feeds to highlight activities that our users should know about. Further details can be found in our Communications Strategy, which outlines developments in this important area. From September 2012 music education in England has been supported by the network of local Music Education Hubs. This is an action point from ‘The Importance of Music – A National Plan for Music Education’ (NPME). There are many references in the NPME to the vital role a hub should play in ensuring high quality music education in schools.
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March Making music matter Music Education Strategy for London

March Making music matter Music Education Strategy for London

Parallel to this vibrant music scene, there has been an explosion of music- making opportunities for young people. A vast number of orchestras, arts organisations, local authority music services, community groups and schools provide musical activities across many diverse traditions for young people. We have seen key innovations in music education: the expansion of whole class teaching; early instrument access for younger children; and successful national schemes like ‘Sing Up’. The 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games have stimulated major music projects like BBC Sounds, which features composing, singing and live performance programmes across the
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SYNOPSIS OF SLOVAK MUSIC EDUCATION

SYNOPSIS OF SLOVAK MUSIC EDUCATION

The music education in Slovakia could be divided into two categories: general music education (provided in primary schools) and vocational music education (provided in vocational secondary schools and universities). Each child must attend music classes in primary school. Some children simultaneously attend music classes in Primary Art Schools focused on instrument playing, singing, composition, etc. Talented children may continue their vocational music education at Conservatories for four to six years (where they are either prepared to study at Universities or to become certified music teachers in Primary Art Schools). After graduation from the Conservatory (or, exceptionally, from another secondary school), the student can study at the University and focus either on art/music performance (to become a music professional in performing arts) or on teaching (to become a music teacher at Primary schools). When a student is very talented, he may continue in his doctoral studies.
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Exploration on Teaching Reform of Vocal Music in Music Education Major in Colleges and Universities

Exploration on Teaching Reform of Vocal Music in Music Education Major in Colleges and Universities

improvement of art conservation of social groups, thus promoting the improvement of the overall comprehensive quality of the masses. Secondly, the reform of music education vocal music course can improve the professional quality of music professionals, enable students to realize their own responsibilities, promote the development of related industries and promote the development of social economy [2]. Thirdly, the reform of music education major can promote the improvement of teaching quality of education major, and education is of great significance to the development of social economy, social system and other aspects. Therefore, the reform of vocal music teaching of music education major in colleges and universities can promote the progress and development of society in the long run.
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Why good-quality music education matters

Why good-quality music education matters

In fact, since the EBacc was announced, the percentage of state school pupils entered for at least 1 GCSE in an arts subject has increased. And so has the number of entries to music GCSE. The government is committed to ensuring that high-quality music education is not the preserve of a social elite, but is the

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The Use of Music Technologies in Field Education Courses and Daily Lives of Music Education Department Students (Sample of Atatürk University)

The Use of Music Technologies in Field Education Courses and Daily Lives of Music Education Department Students (Sample of Atatürk University)

Technology-centric tools have long been an indispensable part of music and music education. In music education, students and teachers should be able to follow and use these technological developments closely as in this age, technology leads the future, it is also important for the future of education. “As education technologies play an important role both in learning and teaching, no doubt, music teachers need to have the knowledge and skills to use these technologies” [7]. Music teacher education draws attention to because it is not only based on a scientific / artistic basis among the disciplines by its institution, rule and function, but also it is open to the possibility of utilizing all kinds of technological equipment required by this age [11].
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Performing Identities, Performing Possibilities: A Music-Centered and Relational Perspective on Performance in Community Music Therapy and Music Education

Performing Identities, Performing Possibilities: A Music-Centered and Relational Perspective on Performance in Community Music Therapy and Music Education

participation because their musics are not seen as valuable by the dominant culture (Green, 2012; Small, 1998). Noting the social privilege required to secure the training and musician identity necessary to become a music therapist or music educator (Gonzalez, 2010; Zubrzycki, 2015) it is no wonder that professionals within these disciplines are disproportionately White (AMTA, 2011; Bradley, 2007; Elpus, 2015; Hess, 2017, 2018). In turn, this contributes to a colonial agenda within schools of music, where particular musics are reproduced—thereby validating particular students—and many others are omitted (Bradley, 2007). Race scholars recognize that race is a social construction, performed, not unlike Butler’s notion of gender (Koza, 2008). Whiteness, then, as a “dominant ideology”, is “reinscribe[d]… through superficial engagement with diversity and through failing to engage discourses of race and power” (Hess, 2017, “Interrupting What?”, para. 5). I acknowledge this ideology’s troubling impact upon music education, music therapy, and our clients and students, and recognize that our disciplines must continue to engage critically and reflexively with these themes. Participants in my research were largely Caucasian,
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How Music Education Helps Students Learn, Achieve, and Succeed Music. Matters

How Music Education Helps Students Learn, Achieve, and Succeed Music. Matters

3 Equips students to be creative. Employers identify creativity as one of the top five skills important for success in the workforce (Lichtenberg, Woock, & Wright, 2008). Music education helps develop originality and flexibility, which are key components of creativity and innovation. Graduates from music programs report that creativity, teamwork, communication, and critical thinking are skills and competencies necessary in their work, regardless of whether they are working in music or in other fields (Craft, 2001; SNAAP, 2011).

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MUSIC EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA SCHOOLS. A Research Based Approach to Determine the Status and Condition of Music Education in Oklahoma Schools

MUSIC EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA SCHOOLS. A Research Based Approach to Determine the Status and Condition of Music Education in Oklahoma Schools

Like any valuable research, this preliminary report raises more questions than it answers. Throughout this process it has become clear that additional information is required to provide a thorough and comprehensive review of student participation in programs at the school level. While the findings here will help identify key trends for consideration, a deeper study will provide valuable guidelines for administrators, policy makers, organizations and parents as music education continues to move into the future. The partners hope that this preliminary report is the catalyst to acquire the information needed for more complete and meaningful recommendations.
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Master's Theses in Music History and Literature, Theses in Music Composition, and Theses and Final Projects in Music Education

Master's Theses in Music History and Literature, Theses in Music Composition, and Theses and Final Projects in Music Education

Gaining Approval for the Thesis in the Graduate School, and Final Destination of the Thesis. One copy of the thesis in Music History and Literature or thesis in Music Education must be submitted to the Graduate School by the date established by Graduate Student Services for graduation in a particular semester; this is usually about two weeks prior to the end of the examination period in the semester. The date is also published in the monthly Graduate School electronic newsletter, which the graduate adviser in music distributes to music graduate students via the music-grads listserv. Theses in Music History and Literature and theses in Music Education become part of the circulating collection of the Golda Meir Library.
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The affective element in	primary school music education : school	music programmes	and	their	influence	on children’s attitudes to music

The affective element in primary school music education : school music programmes and their influence on children’s attitudes to music

rather than by the classroom teachers, to ensure that the procedure and clarification on any questions was consistently the same (G. Anderson, 1998), and to prevent students’ responses being influenced by their perceptions of what the teacher wants. In addition, the time taken to explain the project, sign the consent forms and to complete the survey gave teachers an additional 20 to 30 minutes of non-contact time, depending on year level, although most teachers were interested to observe the process. Being in classrooms also allowed the researcher to gain a sense of the school culture, view the spaces in which music education takes place and make anecdotal notes about students’ body language and comments during discussions about music. Dialogues with teachers during the survey process informally confirmed or clarified insights gained from other sources as well as giving a sense of the value placed upon music by generalist teachers.
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