Power in Internet governance

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Knowledge is Power: Investigating China’s ICT Power to reshape Global Internet Governance

Knowledge is Power: Investigating China’s ICT Power to reshape Global Internet Governance

Taking all documents into consideration, China’s ICT capabilities can therefore be identified as far from the discourse institutionalization that is required to qualify Chinese discourse as dominant discourse. Moreover, they do not reach the discourse structuration level either, indicating the lack of influence of Chinese ICT capabilities altogether. In fact, considering the extent to which documents mention Chinese norms in comparison for China’s vocal advocacy of the same norms in the early 2000s, there appears to be a gradual decline in Chinese advocacy efforts. Two non-mutually exclusive explanations for this development appear likely. Firstly, China accepted its low likelihood of success within the international discourse that was already strongly influenced by the free and open idea of internet governance for ICANN. Secondly, Chinese officials realized that the multi-stakeholder model without direct US control over ICANN would achieve its goals of limiting US power without the necessity for strong Chinese advocacy. Despite initial opposition to the multi-stakeholder model in the early 2000s 154 , Gianluigi Negro finds that Chinese officials began to familiarize themselves with the benefits of the multi-stakeholder model throughout the transition process 155 . This ultimately led to their acceptance of the model and the consequent halt to its
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Multilateralism, the EU and the evolving global governance of the internet

Multilateralism, the EU and the evolving global governance of the internet

Whilst in recent years the EU’s commitment to be an effective international actor through ‘multilateralism’ (see European Council 2003) has been associated more with its security activities, it has actually been an enduring part of its international existence for some time (Smith and Elgstrøm, 2008). Indeed, the EU’s engagement with multilateral structures and its commitment to multilateralism has been the subject of much academic investigation across a variety of themes – the most prominent including trade (Young 2002; Meunier and Nicolaides 1999; Mortensen 2009) and security (Graham 2006; Wouters et al 2006; van Ham 2009; Varwick amnd Koops 2009), environment (Falkner 2007; Bretherton and Vogler 2006) human rights (Smith 2006; Laitikainnen and Smith 2006; Manners 2002, 2006) and communications (Christou and Simpson 2007a, 2007b; Puppis 2008; Young 2002). Such studies have revealed the problematic nature of the EU’s commitment to multilateralism through its actions – highlighting contradictions and constraints to its effective pursuit. However, despite the emergence of much literature on the EU and ‘multilateralism’ the conceptualisation and application of the latter remains rather rudimentary in nature, with its predominantly traditional state-centric definition often dominating academic discussion. It is the intention here, therefore, to try to unpack multilateralism and its relationship to governance, in order to allow us to create a deeper understanding of the EU’s projection in the evolving Internet governance process. Important contextually is that within the EU the meaning and function of multilateralism differs according to its ‘variable identity’ as an international actor. In the case of Internet governance the dominant mode of EU engagement is clearly normative and civilian in nature, which also has implications for how the EU can influence proceedings within ICANN, WSIS and the IGF. As a civilian power, EU preference is for normative multilateralism whereby the multilateral option in its external relations is not simply a policy (functional) choice, but rather part of the EU’s normative make-up and it is seen as the most legitimate mode of engagement for resolving regional and global problems (Kienzle, 2008: 12). In this sense, multilateralism as a method is perceived (in theory, at least) to hold advantages for fostering cooperation and change – in particular in addressing complex policy dynamics – as it is much more likely to produce more effective outcomes through the creation of collaborative networks at different levels of governance. Moreover, it is seen as a mode that can imbue legitimacy and credibility - in particular in its global organisation variant. Equally, there are many constraints to achieving an effective form of multilateralism in practice.
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Shaping the global communications milieu: The EU's influence on internet and telecommunications governance

Shaping the global communications milieu: The EU's influence on internet and telecommunications governance

The three main aspects of this framework need to be unpacked further. First, ‘opportunity’ (Bretherton and Vogler 2008). EU external factors (Jorgensen 2009; 12), or as others have labelled it, the logic of the external opportunity structure (Smith and Xie 2009; 9), denote the pressures and opportunities (to act) that arise from broader international structures in terms of both social and material content. For Jorgensen (2009: 12) this entails examination of the: 1) international distribution of power 2) international interaction and social structures 3) the influence of other governments (and organizations) 4) the international cultural environment. When analysing telecommunications and Internet governance, these are important factors, not least because these two sub-sectors of communications, and the EU’s role within them, have evolved under different actor constellations, but with the US as primary in both (and thus the interaction between the EU and US significant), though less important in the case of telecommunications. Different local, national and global conditions and pressures also exist within different, though in part overlapping, timeframes in both cases. Finally, there are contrasting global institutions often underpinned by contradictory and contested governance principles in each case. Within telecommunications, for example, the movement away from the embedded liberalism of the 1970s towards the promotion of neoliberal ideas in the global political economy in the 1980s, of which the EU (through the European Commission) was a key protagonist, meant that it was ideally placed to influence the institutions that would govern world trade (WTO) and indeed to take a prominent position (alongside the US), in constructing, promoting and successfully embedding its own governance goals for the telecommunications sector internally and outwards through the WTO.
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Shaping the global communications milieu : the EU's influence on internet and telecommunications governance

Shaping the global communications milieu : the EU's influence on internet and telecommunications governance

(to act) that arise from broader international structures in terms of both social and material content. For Jørgensen (2009: 12) this entails examination of the: 1) international distribution of power 2) international interaction and social structures 3) the influence of other governments (and organizations) and 4) the international cultural environment. When analysing telecommunications and Internet governance these are important factors, not least because these two sub-sectors of communications, and the EU’s role within them, have evolved under different actor constellations, with the interaction between the EU and US important in both. Local, national and global conditions and pressures also exist within different, though in part overlapping, timeframes in both cases. There are contrasting global institutions often underpinned by contested governance principles in each case. Within telecommunications, for example, the movement away from the embedded liberalism of the 1970s towards the promotion of neoliberal ideas in the global political economy in the 1980s, of which the EU (through the European Commission) was a key protagonist, meant that it was ideally placed to influence the institutions that would govern world trade (WTO) and indeed to take a prominent position (alongside the US), in constructing, promoting and successfully embedding its own governance goals for the telecommunications sector internally and outwards through the WTO.
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Brazil's Organization of the NETmundial Meeting: Moving Forward in Global Internet Governance

Brazil's Organization of the NETmundial Meeting: Moving Forward in Global Internet Governance

point refers to the selection mechanisms of stakeholders. From their experiences of organising NETmundial Almeida et al. enumerated a number of elements which still need improving. Among them the question of how to identify an adequate set of stakeholders for a particular issue, which mechanisms and criteria should be used for a better selection of stakeholder representatives, how to guarantee a fair power balance between powerful NGOs and private actors and those which are much less influential. 102 An online public consultation process, as carried out by NETmundial, definitely provides the opportunity for all possible stakeholders interested in a particular issue to participate. The online process eliminates many barriers and obstacles to participation which exist in the offline world, as, for instance, when it comes to selecting a small number of stakeholder representatives for the venue of a physical meeting such as NETmundial. Here again, the organisers were creative and established 33 hubs all around the world for those who were not able to participate in the meeting in São Paulo. Of the more than 800 applications received from civil society and the private sector, the organisers selected more than half of them based on a balance of gender, geography and stakeholder group.
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Digital Divide in Global Internet Governance: The “Access” Issue Area

Digital Divide in Global Internet Governance: The “Access” Issue Area

Digital divide has been routinely defined in terms of the disparities in access to the Internet for populations in the affluent West and the impoverished South. In this paper, it is proposed that the global “digital divide” reappears at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), where differing agendas and interpretations of what constitutes “access” to the Internet divide the participants.As a result, the opportunity for the participants to share expertise about the technological, legal, economic, and policy issues of Internet Governance is reduced. The “access” discussion area is a representative case of the diversity of stakeholder notions on: what constitutes the governance aspects in that area, which the levels of responsibility and generating solutions are, and which the priority issues are to be included in the IGF agenda. The applied critical discourse analysis reveals some important dynamics, which pertain to strategic definitions, identifying concerns, sharing “best practices”, imposing expert opinions, and adopting the dominant vocabulary and discourse strategies. After a brief overview of the developments in the field of global Internet governance, theoretical insights are presented from the interorganizational and management studies (theory of multistakeholder collaboration), and political philosophy and international studies (Foucault’s interpretation of power and governmentality).
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The Future of Internet Governance: Dystopia, Utopia, or Realpolitik?

The Future of Internet Governance: Dystopia, Utopia, or Realpolitik?

and possibly new agreements. This would actually have resulted in very little change with respect to the status quo, because the US exercises its power in ways other than formal control of naming and addressing, for example by compelling US-based private companies to disclose information used for surveillance [72, 75]. In February 2012, the European Commission called for globalization of ICANN and IANA, while retaining the current multi-stakeholder model [191]. The call for the globalization of ICANN and the retention of the current governance model was welcomed by the US government, but the US said nothing about the globalization of IANA [192]. Subsequently, the US clarified its position [193], stating that it was asking ICANN to convene global stakeholders to develop a proposal to transition the role played by the US government in the coordination of the DNS, and that it would not accept a proposal that replaces the role of the US government with a government-led or an inter-governmental organization solution. Thus, the US unilaterally decided to give to ICANN the mandate to come up with a proposed change to the current system, while putting pre-conditions on the outcome of the consultations. Further, the US language was interpreted to mean that, in order to retain the IANA function, ICANN would have to remain a private company, and thus be subject to the laws of at least the country in which it is incorporated, the USA. While some welcomed this announcement, others criticized it, fearing that ICANN might lack sufficient accountability [18, 194, 195]. And the proposal drew criticism from some members of the US Congress, who stressed that governments should not be involved (while apparently failing to notice that their involvement belied that point) [196].
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Building consensus on Internet access at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF)

Building consensus on Internet access at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF)

of traditional perspectives of telecom regulation that are predominantly sector-specific, and the adoption of a more economically and socially inclusive perspective/ approach instead. Such an approach/perspective would see ICTs as more than just a communicative tool but as key to local development. In particular, workshop par- ticipants promoted the idea of a multi-sector approach to regulation and/or adoption of a multi-sector regulator model – where the focus is on exploiting the comple- mentarities between different types of infrastructure (e.g. laying down roads, water canals, power and ICT cabling or the use of the power grid for enabling ICT) so as to not only reduce costs of infrastructure development but also to contribute to the potentially more effective use of universal access funds and/or scarce development resources.
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BACKGROUND REPORT THE WORKING GROUP ON INTERNET GOVERNANCE

BACKGROUND REPORT THE WORKING GROUP ON INTERNET GOVERNANCE

228. There is a significant number of intergovernmental agreements that currently or potentially affect Internet governance. Although these agreements may have different kinds of titles (e.g. the Telecommunications Annex to the WTO Trade in Services Agreement, the ITU International Telecommunication and Radio Regulations, the WIPO Copyright and Performances and Phonograms Treaties) they are all international legal instruments according to the Vienna Convention on Treaty Law, since they have been signed and ratified by various national authorities (governments, parliaments, and Heads of State). Thus, these agreements establish both national and international legal obligations. However, although they have a similar status in international law, there are important differences in the degree to which intergovernmental agreements are enforceable, and binding on Member States. The WTO, for example, is able to make determinations on trade issues that are internationally enforceable. Through its dispute settlement mechanism it has the power to authorize retaliation when a country does not comply with a ruling. The other international organizations, whose activities affect aspects of Internet governance, such as ITU, WIPO, and UNESCO, do not have these kinds of enforcement powers. In addition, not all decisions made by international organizations are necessarily binding on Member States. For example, the resolutions on
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Internet Governance & Cyber Crimes In UAE

Internet Governance & Cyber Crimes In UAE

immediately. Therefore, Hasbini (2014) says that the most dangerous had attack on user is bank malware in UAE. In this case, Most of them don't aware the cyber fraudulent activities when it comes online payment and e-services, because of the wide smartphones availability of unprotected that has tented to target users with malware and phishing attacks affecting all types of devices. In Emirates 247 (2015) has identify the internal procedures, and implementing training and awareness programs. In order to solve this problem UAE police have established cybercrime and organizational security units, also they have computer forensics teams who specialize in examining and presenting electronic evidence that store on computers or on other electronic devices. Were their roles includes "investigating all types of crimes committed against and by means of computer data and systems”. (Emirates 247, 2015). Also, Moyenorient3 (2014) says that they have a specialists use a cyber-police power to oversee the Internet, including its use by human rights activists. Abu Dhabi‟s State Security Apparatus and the Department of Anti-Electronic Crimes has also been created within the Criminal Investigation Department of the Dubai police, has created a unit specialized in cyber crime to spy in the internet and its users. As Berger (2012) according to his words, is an important to change the policy of any company, which they need to change their technology always to make sure the company system is secure tightly. In addition, GaskellPublished (2015) mention that the user must also be aware of threats aimed at exploiting mobile games, some games carried within it spyware functionality to record sounds, process calls and steal SMS information. According to Wam (2012) article, the “Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al
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Power and multistakeholderism in internet global governance  Towards a synergetic theoretical framework

Power and multistakeholderism in internet global governance Towards a synergetic theoretical framework

This paper reviews theories of power and develops a multilayered theoretical framework specifically developed for the study of the innovative multistakeholder collaborative process in Internet governance. 3 Power and power dynamics are focal variables of the investigation. The theoretical framework proposed holds explanatory potential as it contains a comprehensive synthesis of theory pertaining to the contemporary political process; from inter-organizational to the global public policy level. This approach is based on the fundamental Foucauldian understanding that, as a pervasive social dynamic, power animates the relationship of communication technologies and society. The communicative process in general, as well as each of its constitutive elements (communication technology and policy among others), cannot and should not be studied apart from the historically-specific power matrix.
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New governance, the internet, and country code top level domains in Europe

New governance, the internet, and country code top level domains in Europe

It is also clear that a much more market-oriented approach is being developed by AFNIC. In 2005, it launched a brand image survey, a procedure for the selection of publicity agencies and began to draft a new communications plan. It also created a series of relations support measures with the French registrar business, involving meeting them, consultation to determine their expectations and assembling a network of AFNIC correspondents in them to deal with information dissemination and feedback (AFNIC 2005: 12-13). AFNIC has also set up ‘technical, marketing and communications working groups and legal workshops’ (Weill 2005: 7). In this case, clear evidence exists of a mix of commercialisation and non-hierarchical governance measures. It suggests a strong stimulus to ensure that the French ccTLD develops into an internationally leading system, something which is only realistically achievable in the global TLD industry through adhering to key norms of the sector as they developed outside France. However, the significant presence of the state in AFNIC suggests that the French system contains important elements of ‘concerted action’ and ‘sub-contracting’. The French government has promoted the public-private hybrid nature of the dot fr governance system as an innovative model, stemming from a pragmatic realization that the French ccTLD could not be managed through a public institution given the evolutionary history of the Internet (authors’ interview 2008). However, this had led to tensions within AFNIC where market players have been frustrated by the state’s presence where this is perceived not to take account of market realities (authors’ interview 2008).
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Members' voting power in the governance of the International Monetary Fund

Members' voting power in the governance of the International Monetary Fund

The system of governance of the IMF is of considerable interest as a research topic not only because of the crucial importance of international financial organisations to the management of the world economy in an era of increasing globalisation. Current discussions surrounding the reform of the architecture of the international economic institutions give it unprecedented topical relevance. The IMF is also a worthwhile subject of research from the general point of view of the design of voting systems because it is one of a number of international organisations that operate on the basis of the weighted voting power of their members (the World Bank, the European Union Council of Ministers and regional development banks are some of the others; in contrast, for example to the United Nations General Assembly or the World Trade Organisation which use one-country-one-vote). Weighted voting is used because inequality of voting power between countries is a fundamental design feature intended to reflect inequality of contributions of resources. However, weighted voting raises the important question of whether the resulting inequality of power over actual decisions is precisely what was intended for the relationship between power and contribution.
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Enforcement agencies' power of surveillance: The need for governance

Enforcement agencies' power of surveillance: The need for governance

Powers of Surveillance under Malaysian Laws Malaysia does not have an omnibus laws that govern various aspects of surveillance powers like the United Kingdom Regulation of Investigatory [r]

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Market Power, Governance and Innovation: OECD Evidence

Market Power, Governance and Innovation: OECD Evidence

Empirical work on the relationship between governance institutions and innovation is few and far in between. Clarke (2001) is the first attempt at investigating the relationship between rule of law and innovation in a panel of developed and developing countries. The study reports that R&D expenditures tend to be lower in countries where the risk of expropriation is higher and the rule of law is weaker. Giménez and Sanaú (2007) provide a model where rule of law has a positive effect on technological development and economic growth. Using evidence for 64 countries averaged over 1985-1997, the authors report that the model’s prediction is confirmed by the data. A similar result is established by Dakhli and de Clercq (2004), who report that a reliable legal system and effective patent registration is conducive to higher levels of innovation. More recently, Tebaldi and Elmslie (2013) also propose a model where institutional quality affects innovation by helping in the process of registering new patents, diffusion of ideas across researchers, enforcement of property rights and reducing the uncertainty of new projects. Using data averaged over 1970-2003 for 110 countries, the authors report a positive and significant relationship between USPTO-granted patents and individual institutional indicators, which consist of control of corruption, market- friendly policies, protection of property rights and a more effective judiciary system. The results remain robust when initial level of knowledge stock (proxied by country shares in book production) is controlled for with a sample of 76 countries.
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Global Platform Governance: Private Power in the Shadow of the State

Global Platform Governance: Private Power in the Shadow of the State

Recognizing platforms’ important regulatory role suggests its own solu- tion to the problems of legitimacy and accountability: the application of administrative law principles and values to hold platforms to account. Part III explains how principles of transparency, participation, reasoned decision-making, and judicial review could be deployed to render private speech governance both legitimate and accountable. What’s more, look- ing to procedural values like these would help to ensure that all the par- ties affected by content removal have a voice in the process, and would avoid fruitless attempts to create substantive rules for resolving a bevy of online disputes. Examining what it would take to implement these princi- ples also makes clear that current frameworks governing content deletion are insufficient because they stymie the ability to achieve any of the four. In short, the imposition of these standards would benefit all parties—the public, the government, and the companies themselves.
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Spaces of informalisation : playscapes, power and the governance of behaviour

Spaces of informalisation : playscapes, power and the governance of behaviour

Geographers have contributed a great deal towards an understanding of social control across different spaces and the ways in which power is exercised in the interests of elite groups to the detriment of marginalized 'Others'. Little attention however, has been given to de- controlled spaces: spaces where the standard of conduct expected of previous generations is no longer as rigid and formalized as it once was. This paper draws on the work of Norbert Elias and Cas Wouters in exploring how previously prohibited behaviours become admissible within particular social situations, groups and settings: a process known as informalization. The informalization thesis posits that a long term perspective can elucidate the ways in which gradual changes in expected standards of behaviour are linked to corresponding changes in social habitus and the power differentials that characterize the social relations between elite and outsider groups. The paper contends that a revision of the sociological concept of informalization, emphasizing spatial context and difference can contribute a great deal to debates in human geography. It is argued that the spatialization of Elias' work could provide a useful theoretical framework with which to enhance the geographer's understanding of the relationship between group identities, power, social change and governance. Conversely, a focus on the spaces of informalization may also advance the theory from a sociological perspective. The theory is applied to specific playscapes and highlights the uneven,
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Voting power in the governance of the International Monetary Fund

Voting power in the governance of the International Monetary Fund

Executive Board is responsible for the general operations of the IMF. 9 The powers exercised by the Board of Governors and expressly reserved to it by the Articles of Agreement refer to matters of a fundamental or political nature or which may have a profound economic impact; these include the power to admit new members, require a member to withdraw, approve a revision of quota and determine the number of Executive Directors who are elected. Some powers are vested in the Executive Board and the exercise of them does not depend on delegation from the Board of Governors, such as the election of the Managing Director and the power to suspend or terminate suspension of certain provisions. As well as exercising the powers either vested in them or delegated to them, an important role of the Executive Board is to make recommendations to the Board of Governors about decisions which the latter is to take. The Board of Governors delegates much actual policymaking to the Executive Board and its own meetings are often therefore largely ceremonial.
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Power theft Detection and Power Energy Saving by using Internet of Things

Power theft Detection and Power Energy Saving by using Internet of Things

ABSTRACT: As in everywhere automation is required to reduce the work and curbing electricity theft in India, which accounts for 80% of the power losses. While the nation strives to mark a new golden era, the power sector suffers contributing to blackouts and costs $17 billion in lost revenue annually, according to calculations by Bloomberg. With the nation-wide production at over 250GW, as on August 2016 , weak infrastructure accounts for various losses – transmission, distribution, aggregate technical and commercial losses due to these is occurs by power thefting our paper mainly focused on to identify these power thefting and calculate the units from the appliance and it gives the notification depend upon the consumption and electrical appliance may control through the internet at anywhere in the world there is no distance parameter for that and manual reset to start the function again.The main objectives of this system are described clearly as follows: theft of electricity increases the costs paid by customers and can have serious safety consequences. Detecting electricity theft has been traditionally addressed by physical checks of tamper-evident seals by field personnel and by using balance meters. Identify the theft by sending alert SMS to the owner. Sent meter readings and rate every month to the owner. Adding with these setup an efficient Internet of Things (IOT) is defined, which portraits the global connection environment to the users and allow them to view the status of meter reading and theft associations globally from anywhere at any time. Theft of electricity has a material impact on customers in terms of cost and safety. We consider that the existing regulatory framework does not adequately encourage suppliers to be proactive in detecting theft.
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The black box of power in polycentric environmental governance

The black box of power in polycentric environmental governance

Power dynamics in fl uence not only the emergence and design of polycentric governance structures but also decisions about policy choices and the way policy outcomes are assessed within those struc- tures. Elinor and Vincent Ostrom proposed that all policies are ex- periments therefore an important analytical task is to clarify variables and causality. While network analysts have produced interesting visual depictions of governance, which can essentially be viewed as “ struc- tural fingerprints” of the more visible distributions of power within a polycentric system, there is little comprehension of how different types of power explain patterns of con fl ict, competition, convergence, and divergence in policy choices and outcomes across polycentric systems (Lubell et al., 2017; Scott and Thomas, 2017; Weible and Heikkila, 2017). Better understanding of interdependence and feedbacks is es- sential. Re-emphasising polycentric governance as an experiment in power thus allows us to move beyond claiming that “power matters” to understanding which variables explain how power matters, how ex- planatory variables depend on other variables (e.g. number and type of actors, scalar and temporal dimensions, state of knowledge, range of drivers, range of possible solutions, range of venues), and how poly- centric governance might be e ff ective relative to other arrangements and non-structural influences (Poteete et al., 2010; Turnbull et al., 2018). This effort may necessitate the introduction of new quantitative precision, for example, through comparative analysis of how various attributes of polycentric structure influence and are influenced by the different types of power (Bodin, 2017; Smith et al., 2014). Substantial inroads (drawing on institutional collective action frameworks, and social network analysis, semiautomated text analysis and fuzzy cogni- tive mapping techniques) are already being made to overcome tradi- tional shortcomings in collecting and analysing in-depth
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