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By-Laws of the Congregation First Presbyterian Church Neenah, Wisconsin January 1, 2021

By-Laws of the Congregation First Presbyterian Church Neenah, Wisconsin January 1, 2021

The First Presbyterian Church of Neenah, Wisconsin is established as a corporation under articles of incorporation in the State of Wisconsin. Consistent with the laws of the state, both ecclesiastical and corporate business may be conducted at the same meeting of the congregation. Active members voting on corporate matters must be of legal voting age in accordance with the legal requirements of the State of Wisconsin. (G-1.0503)

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Trinity. Sunday, January 10th, 2021 Baptism of the Lord. Trinity Presbyterian Church

Trinity. Sunday, January 10th, 2021 Baptism of the Lord. Trinity Presbyterian Church

LIKE OUR TPC FACEBOOK PAGE! The Outreach Team invites the Trinity family to go to our Trinity Presbyterian Church (TPC) Facebook page to like it! When in Facebook search, “@TrinityPrescottAZ” to find it and there you have options to like it, leave a comment, and/or share it with “friends.” This is a powerful tool to help us get the good word out about TPC.

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Lost within the Rubble: The Archaeological Findings from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church Burial Vaults

Lost within the Rubble: The Archaeological Findings from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church Burial Vaults

Early fieldwork involved two concurrently performed tasks – monitoring renewed con- struction excavations through incomplete sec- tions of the building footprint and conducting thorough investigations of the initial find spot. Construction monitoring was completed over the course of the ensuing few weeks and found no additional skeletal material in any other portion of the site. Archaeologists identi- fied and mapped the foundations of the ca. 1836 Spring Street Presbyterian Church and determined that the church had been built on shallow stone foundations with no attendant basement level. Efforts to find evidence of the first (1811–1835) church building, however, proved fruitless. Careful monitoring of the open yard space formerly bounding the west side of the church property found that it had never been used for burial or interment purposes. Hand excavation within the original find spot revealed that all skeletal material exam- ined by OCME staff was derived from soil and rubble recently disturbed by site machinery. Archaeologists recovered significant quantities of disarticulated and sometimes badly crushed human bone scattered over an area within an approximate 50-ft. radius of the find spot. This material consisted of a mix of cranial and post- cranial elements, representing the remains of multiple individuals of various ages and gen- ders, and was interspersed randomly throughout the demolition debris. The densest clusters of remains were situated in close prox- imity to the original find spot and were com- prised of loose, co-mingled pockets of bone mixed with concentrations of badly decayed wood, likely coffin wood, and a variety of funerary artifacts. These artifacts consisted pri- marily of probable coffin nails and screws, but also included scattered coffin hinges and a handful of fragmentary coffin lid plates. Once all disarticulated remains and associ- ated artifacts were documented and collected from the original find spot, construction Figure 1. Plan of the construction site showing where human remains were initially discovered, with respect to
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350 Years Reformed in South Africa: The contribution of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa

350 Years Reformed in South Africa: The contribution of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa

The struggle continued though there seemed to be a clear desire for improved relations though on whose terms was still unclear: “The Mission Council prays for a renewed spirit of consecration and mutual confidence in each other on the part of the Mission Council and the Bantu Presbyterian Church with a view to friendly and effective co-operation.” (BPC BB 1937 Min 1286 Deliverance of the Mission Council of SA). Was this perhaps the beginning of a solution and did it indicate a renewed modus operandi in the face of a forthcoming FMC Commission to South Africa? The BPC made a clear submission (BPC BB 1937 Appendix, Bantu Presbyterian Church Address to the FMC Commission) to the Commission on a number of points revealing that there were still unresolved issues. With regard to staffing from Scotland, the BPC affirmed “we feel we must learn to face our difficulties and be able to overcome them …. We would ask to retain one Scottish missionary doing district work at each Presbytery for the next ten or fifteen years, and after that time the matter shall be examined in the light of the circumstances of that time”. This was a somewhat new policy proposal. Concerning property the church averred: “The presence of a Mission Council, a separate body working in the Bantu Church, and a Bantu Church Assembly an independent body governing the Bantu Church, shall never harmonise. The two must be one and govern one church. We know it will be difficult to do away with the old regime; but we believe that we must work and plan for the new”. Other matters raised related to the need for financial support for projects, including the Pension Fund, Theological Education and Church offices.
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Reading the back page : listening to clergy serving in the presbyterian church (USA) reflecting on professional burnout

Reading the back page : listening to clergy serving in the presbyterian church (USA) reflecting on professional burnout

Quantitative surveys routinely dedicate the back page for participants to offer their own narrative comments, but often these comments are neither analyzed nor reported. The aim of the present study is to analyze the responses to the back page from a study concerned with work-related psychological health and professional burnout completed by clergy serving in The Presbyterian Church (USA). Of the 748 clergy who took part in the survey, 224 wrote (sometimes multiple) comments on the back page (30% participation rate). The 345 identified comments have been analyzed to reflect 16 themes, 13 concerned with aspects of ministry and 3 concerned with aspects of the survey itself. The ministry-related themes included reflections on stress and burnout, tensions with congregations, support from congregations, time off and study leave, and marriage-related issues. The conclusion is drawn that reading the back page generates useful information in three areas: giving additional insight into the theme explored by the quantitative survey, drawing attention to weaknesses in the survey instrument, and shaping future research.
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Westminster Presbyterian Church West Chester, PA

Westminster Presbyterian Church West Chester, PA

Later this year we will be celebrating a milestone for Westminster Presbyterian Church — 20 years in our facility here on South Pleasant Grove Road. It will also be 120 years since the first groundbreaking for Westminster — a chapel at the corner of South Church and East Barnard Streets in the borough. What a wonderful history to cele- brate. Yet we are one very small part of the history of the church of Jesus Christ. Acts of the Apostles (or as some suggest, Acts of the Holy Spirit) tells the story of the beginning development and growth of the church. It tells how, in 20 short years, Christianity spread from Jerusalem to Rome. In the first chapter (1:8) Jesus tells His disciples, “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the Earth.”
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The Bible Presbyterian Church: Striving For Purity and Adequately Serving the Lord

The Bible Presbyterian Church: Striving For Purity and Adequately Serving the Lord

As we enter into the 21 st century, we must adequately deal with the issues that come our way without splitting the Church. “That there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care for one another” (1 Cor 12:25). We must be careful not to destroy our own denomination. Here are some areas that come to mind to enable us to improve the Bible Presbyterian Church.

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The Bantu Presbyterian Church in South Africa and Ecumenism, 1940–1999

The Bantu Presbyterian Church in South Africa and Ecumenism, 1940–1999

This aimed to produce a more coherent approach to ecumenism. The first term of reference was ‘To promote, foster and maintain good fraternal relations between the Reformed Presbyterian Church and other denominations of the Universal Church of Jesus Christ’ (RPCSA 1988:56). It placed no limitation on who it would negotiate with. The ERC report in 1985 (RPCSA 1985:30) showed part of the extent of national and international ecumenical relations which included the CUC, the South African Council of Churches, the All Africa Council of Churches, the World Council of Churches, the Alliance of Black Reformed Christians in South Africa (ABRECSA) and the Church of Scotland, as well as the denominations with which the BPCSA was in union negotiations. De Gruchy (2005:124) is correct in his opinion that ‘It is difficult to overestimate the significance of these longstanding and extensive ecumenical relationships for the struggle of the church in South Africa’. Yet, serious tensions arose in 1968 when the World Council initiated its Programme to combat racism which caused great tension within the multi-racial churches and between them and the black churches. Despite this, his assertion is correct for great benefits were derived from the support of the church universal in terms of morale.
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Stylistic Appraisal of ‘Change’ As an Ideology in the Presbyterian Church Day Speeches of Right Reverend Doctor Festus Ambe Asana, Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon

Stylistic Appraisal of ‘Change’ As an Ideology in the Presbyterian Church Day Speeches of Right Reverend Doctor Festus Ambe Asana, Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon

Stylistic analysis is analysing the style in language, and its variation according to factors such as the author, genre, context and historical period. The style in language deals with the language used in a given context, taking into consideration those involved, therefore causing one speaker or writer’s style to be different from another. The choice of language from available language resources and different contexts make the texts different, given that the language users have different ways of representing the world. The present study analyses the five Presbyterian Church day speeches made by Right Reverend Dr Festus Ambe Asana, moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon from 2009 to 2014. The study uses the concepts of Style and the Rhetorical Appeals which are logos, ethos and pathos, as framework. Asana commands respect, credibility and authority as a moderator, uses logical facts and analogies in appealing to the emotions of the Christians of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon to change and become responsible children of God, whether in church or in their work places. Change as an ideology during Asana’s reign as moderator is expressed in his speeches through stylistic devices like dyads, triads, contrasts and images. The images show positive movement from one stage or point to another, the contrasts show the pictures of what is and what is supposed to be and the triads and dyads give a vivid image of what Asana considers a Christian whose outward change in influenced by an inner mindset.
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Voices of Faith. From Deb s Desk. Faith Presbyterian Church. Inside this issue:

Voices of Faith. From Deb s Desk. Faith Presbyterian Church. Inside this issue:

will hold its September meeting at Waukesha, Southminster Presbyterian Church on Tues- day, September 26. The Rev. Denise Anderson, pastor of Uni- ty Presbyterian Church, Temple Hills, Maryland, is co-moderator of our General Assembly. She will lead a workshop on the in- tersection of race and poverty and will preach during the evening service of worship. All are invited to attend but you need to register through the Presbytery of Milwaukee’s web page —

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Hope Home. Winterset. A Ministry of Winterset First United Presbyterian Church

Hope Home. Winterset. A Ministry of Winterset First United Presbyterian Church

Initial funding will be provided by First United Presbyterian Church. The Church currently has in excess of $150,000 in reserve funds available to it. This funding is more than adequate to provide for the initial down payment for the purchase of the residence (Hope Home), fund remodeling and all other start up costs associated with the project, and if necessary, sustain the project for greater than five years. Pro forma projections which follow demonstrate that we anticipate the project to be self sustaining by 2014 without any Church funding.

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Bethany Presbyterian Church Graham, North Carolina

Bethany Presbyterian Church Graham, North Carolina

“I will show love to those who were called unloved and, to those who were called ‘not-my-people’, I will say ‘you are my people’ and they will answer, ‘you are our God.’” (Hosea 2:23) Bethany Presbyterian Church is a place where the mind is nourished as well as the spirit, and where we affirm the dignity and worth of every person. As we are all created in the image of God, we believe discrimination is incompatible with Christ’s Gospel of unconditional love. While we celebrate our Presbyterian identity, we acknowledge that we are not alone on the path to understanding God. We invite conversations that move us to seek a deeper understanding of life in the Spirit. Be who you are and be welcome here.
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The early Korean Protestant Churches’ impact on Korea’s democratisation: With special reference to the Korean Presbyterian Church

The early Korean Protestant Churches’ impact on Korea’s democratisation: With special reference to the Korean Presbyterian Church

The early Korean Protestant churches in general and the Korean Presbyterian Church in particular, with its Calvinistic, representative or democratic form of government, had a profound impact on the democratisation process of Korea, which has been ‘an East Asian model of economic prosperity and political democracy’ (Kim 2003:xv). In this study we will examine how the Korean Presbyterian Church in particular turned out to be an excellent school of democracy for modern Korea. However, before doing this, we will first study how the Western mission works in general in Korea influenced Korea’s early democratisation, since the Korean Presbyterian Church succeeded and deepened what the Western mission works did. We will focus on the churches’ seminal period (1884–1930s), when they could exert a great deal of democratic influence in modern Korea simply because of Korea’s political instability caused by the Japanese militant colonial rule. The theme of this study has had no due attention so far, yet three related studies are worth mentioning. Firstly, James E. Fisher (1928) in his Democracy and mission education in Korea describes that the mission schools in modern Korea became powerful instruments disseminating humanitarian, egalitarian, affirmative, and democratic ideals and practices. But this seminal study was focused mainly on the mission schools in modern Korea and did not deal with the mission churches’ contribution to Korean democratisation. Secondly, Yun-Shik Chang (1998) illumines how the progressive Korean Christians led Korean democratisation movements during Korea’s authoritarian regimes (1961–1987). However, this study is not only confined to the relatively recent era, but also mainly treats some progressive Korean Christian leaders’ involvements in democratisation movements, overlooking the democratic nature and activities of the early Korean Protestant churches. Thirdly and finally, Seong-Won Park’s study (2007) traces how the Korean Presbyterian Church has been involved in some famous Korean democratisation movements, ignoring how the church itself has been a good school to practice democracy. Hence it is very important to unveil how the Western mission works in Korea in general and the Korean Presbyterian Church in particular contributed to the democratisation of Korea, especially before Korea’s liberation from Japan in 1945.
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Resurrectionists' Excursions: Evidence of Postmortem Dissection from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church

Resurrectionists' Excursions: Evidence of Postmortem Dissection from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church

In this paper we hope to contribute to this relatively diffuse but growing literature by presenting two intriguing cases of cranioto- mies from a historical abolitionist church in New York City. The evidence for postmortem examination in the burial vaults of the Spring Street Presbyterian Church (ca. 1820–1846) raises a number of questions. In particular we would like to know if these individuals were victims of resurrectionists’ excursions, and, if so, how their crania came to be interred in vaults associated with an abolitionist congre- gation. For such an inquiry, we need to know more about how our cases relate to (1) the prevalence of grave robbing as related to the practice and instruction of medicine, particu- larly in New York City; (2) the characteristics of those individuals most likely to be exhumed illicitly for postmortem examination, the medical techniques used, and the subsequent fate of such bodies; and (3) the progressive social and political philosophy of the Spring Street congregation. We begin by briefly summarizing the dra- matic physical and social changes taking place within the first half of the 19th century in New York City and the historical land- scape from which the Spring Street Presbyterian Church emerged. We then present the physical evidence for postmortem examination in two crania recovered from the church burial vaults, followed by a discus- sion that contextualizes such embodied acts and objects within an historical frame.
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Assessing the effectiveness of support strategies in reducing professional burnout among clergy serving in the Presbyterian Church (USA)

Assessing the effectiveness of support strategies in reducing professional burnout among clergy serving in the Presbyterian Church (USA)

Against this background the aim of the present study is to examine the effectiveness of five specific support strategies promoted by The Presbyterian Church (USA) for reducing professional burnout and for enhancing work-related psychological health among clergy serving in that Church. The five specific support strategies promoted by The Presbyterian Church (USA) concern the provision of sabbaticals, the availability of study leave, the use of a mentor, the use of a spiritual director, and the membership of a minister peer group. The first two of these five provisions (sabbaticals and periods of study leave) suggest that planned time away from the recurrent pressures of ministry offer opportunities for reflection and for recouperation, as well as for creative study. The other three provisions (mentor, spiritual director, and minister peer group) suggest that planned opportunities to discuss work-related experiences and expectations within the context of secure relationships facilitate mature reflection and evaluation. While many other support strategies may be accessed by individual clergy these five have been specifically identified by this Church. The specific research hypothesis is that accessing any one of these support strategies should be reflected in lower levels of professional burnout, after taking into account individual differences in personality.
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BOOK OF CHURCH ORDER OF THE ORTHODOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

BOOK OF CHURCH ORDER OF THE ORTHODOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

It seems well to include here a brief summary of the history of the adoption of these standards by the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. The formation of this book was begun at the First General Assembly, held in June 1936. That Assembly elected a Committee on the Constitution, composed of the Rev. Ned B. Stonehouse (who became chairman), the Rev. H. McAllister Griffiths, and ruling elder Murray Forst Thompson. The Committee was charged, in addition to its primary obligation to recommend the form of the doctrinal standards to be adopted at the Second Assembly, to “prepare for submission to the next General Assembly a Form of Government, Book of Discipline, and Directory for the Worship of God.” Be- fore the Second Assembly convened in November of that same year, the Committee was able to complete only the first of these docu- ments. The Form of Government was considered and provisionally adopted at that time and at the Third Assembly, held in June 1937, finally adopted. The Directory for the Public Worship of God was submitted to the Fourth Assembly, and after discussion and revision at that Assembly and the Sixth Assembly, held in May 1939, it was adopted. The Book of Discipline, although adopted provisionally as early as the Third Assembly, was revised at the Fourth and Sixth Assemblies and finally adopted at the Seventh Assembly, held in June 1940. Others who served on that Committee, in addition to the original members, were the Rev. Messrs. Alexander K. Davison, R. B. Kuiper, Robert Strong, and Paul Woolley.
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Stories from the Rubble: Analysis of Mortuary Artifacts from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church Vaults

Stories from the Rubble: Analysis of Mortuary Artifacts from the Spring Street Presbyterian Church Vaults

vacancy. He continued to represent Georgia in the Senate until his untimely death in New York City in 1824 (DeGidio 2003: 89–90, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 2008). Senator Ware was in New York City in 1824, at the time of Lafayette’s visit to the United States, when he succumbed to an unidentified ailment and died on September 7 (Walker 1934: 22). On September 22, 1824, a Connecticut newspaper, The American Sentinel, reported: “Died. At New York, on the 7th inst. after a pro- tracted illness for relief from which he had recently visited the springs, the Hon. Nicholas Ware, a Senator in Congress from Georgia.” The recovery of Ware’s coffin plate from the Spring Street Church’s vaults clarifies a contradiction about his birth while presenting a mystery concerning his burial. Accounts of Ware’s life differ regarding the year of his birth; some state 1769 and others 1776 (Walker 1934: 22). On his coffin plate, his age was engraved as 48 years and 7 months, verifying February 1776 as the date of his birth. The mystery which remains unsolved is how Ware came to be buried in the vaults of the Spring Street Presbyterian Church. Several sources on Senator Ware’s life, including those maintained by the United States Figure 3. Portrait of Georgia Senator Nicholas Ware (1776- 1824). (Image courtesy of U.S. Senate Historical Office.)
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WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Westminster Presbyterian Church is available on the Welcome Table in the back of the Sanctuary. We encourage you to fill out the Friendship Binder found in your pew and please join us for refreshments and conversation in the Narthex after the service. If you would like to become a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church, please see Pastor Loren Shellabarger.

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Challenges facing the ministerial formation in Uniting Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa:  A critical reflection

Challenges facing the ministerial formation in Uniting Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa: A critical reflection

Kritzinger (2012:243) cautions us that such process is fraught with power dynamics owing to the colonial policies that thrived on, among other things, excluding indigenous languages and elevating Dutch and English (and later English and Afrikaans). Enormous resources in the government and private sector were channelled towards projects such as Afrikaans universities, cultural organisations to enable Afrikaans to develop as a respected intellectual and public language. The numerous Afrikaans and Afrikaans-English dictionaries attest to the huge funds and intellectual resources which were invested in such an endeavour. We share the sentiments of Kritzinger (2012:243) that the urgent challenge of our time is to mobilise and unlock resources into research to produce multilingual and intercultural books and dictionaries to stimulate intellectual explorations and experimentation within-and-between cultural-linguistic communities (including churches). Such a venture requires collaboration with colleagues from academic departments, such as African languages or linguistics, who are competent in African languages to assist in drawing up glossaries and translations. Secondly, such intercultural theological resources can be of great value for vernacular theologising in ministerial formation of the UPCSA and UP’s Faculty of Theology would have contributed immensely to the church scene and society at large.
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Benefits through the stages of your life. THE BENEFITS PLAN 2016 of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Benefits through the stages of your life. THE BENEFITS PLAN 2016 of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Sec. 6.4 Vesting of Pension Benefits. Benefits provided by the Pension Plan shall become vested in an Active Member or Disabled Member of the Pension Plan at the earliest of (a) the Member’s completion of three (3) Years of Service, (b) the Member’s attainment of Normal Retirement Age, (c) termination of the Pension Plan, or (d) discontinuance of his or her employer’s participation in the Pension Plan for such Member’s employment classification. After completing three (3) Years of Service, a Member shall be fully vested and eligible to receive all benefits to which he or she may be entitled by the terms of the Pension Plan to the extent of his or her accrued Pension Credits. For purposes of this Sec. 6.4, the term “Years of Service” shall include (a) all employment in Eligible Service, (b) Eligible Service while a Member of one of the Former Plans during which time all requisite dues had been paid and (c) years in seminary under the care of a presbytery, provided that the seminarian becomes a teaching elder and commences service in a validated ministry of the Church.
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