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RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005

RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005

The Right to Information Act 2005 (RTI) is an Act of the Parliament of India "to provide for setting out the practical regime of right to information for citizens." The Act applies to all States and Union Territories of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Jammu and Kashmir has its own act called Jammu & Kashmir Right to Information Act, 2009. Under the provisions of the Act, any citizen may request information from a "public authority" (a body of Government or "instrumentality of State") which is required to reply expeditiously or within thirty days. The Act also requires every public authority to computerize their records for wide dissemination and to pro-actively publish certain categories of information so that the citizens need minimum recourse to request for information formally. This law was passed by Parliament on 15 June 2005 and came fully into force on 13 October 2005. Information disclosure in India was hitherto restricted by the Official Secrets Act 1923 and various other special laws, which the new RTI Act now relaxes. The formal recognition of a legal right to information in India occurred more than two decades before legislation was finally enacted, when the Supreme Court of India ruled in State of U.P. v. Raj Narain that the right to information is implicit in the right to freedom of speech and expression explicitly guaranteed in Article 19 of the Indian Constitution.
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UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT,

UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT,

1.1 In order to promote transparency and accountability in the working of every public authority and to empower the citizens to secure access to information under the control of each public authority, the Government of India have enacted The Right to Information Act, 2005, (RTI Act) which came into force on 15.06.2005. In accordance with the provisions of section 4(1) (b) of this Act, the Department of Backward Classes Welfare, Government of Tamil Nadu, and Department of Most Backward Classes and Denotified Communities Welfare, Government of Tamil Nadu have brought out this manual for information and guidance of the stakeholders and the general public.
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IMPLEMENTATION OF RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 IN PUNJAB: AN ANALYSIS

IMPLEMENTATION OF RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 IN PUNJAB: AN ANALYSIS

Punjab Police earned the distinction of being one of the first organizations of Punjab Government to successfully implement the Right to Information Act, 2005, in its true spirit. It goes to the credit of Punjab Police that it adopted a pro-active stance even before the Act became effective. It did its ground-work well and played a praiseworthy role in operationalizing the provisions of the Act. Police Department was the first department of the State to post the relevant information on the national portal i.e. rti.gov.in. It was also one of the first to bring out a well- documented manual as prescribed under the Act. The need for transparency in the working of the police was highlighted in the Mission Statement of the State Police. In a positive departure from official apathy, the department had decided to treat noting as part of the main file for the purposes of dissemination of information much before a decision in this regard was given by the Central Information Commission. 7
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Right to Information Act- A Pragmatic Way to Good & Transparent Government

Right to Information Act- A Pragmatic Way to Good & Transparent Government

Conclus ion: The Right to Information Act 2005 has ushered in a new era of transparency and people's access to information in India. The implementation of the Act is gathering momentum with each passing day. Government, civil societies and the media have generally lent their might to the realization of citizens' right to information through the revolutionary Act. Therefore it can be rightly said that Right to Information act, 2005 is a key instrument of good and transparent governance. It makes administration more answerable to the people. It makes people aware of administration and gives them an opportunity to take part in decision making process. It promoted democratic ideology by promoting openness and transparency in the administration. It reduces the chances of corruption and abuse of authority by public servants. Since the act is prepared for
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Awareness of Right To Information ACT (2005) Among

Awareness of Right To Information ACT (2005) Among

Mazdoor Kishan Sthanaghn took bold initiative to arouse the people in a Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh Block Shahpur Tehshil Shahpur to assert their right to information by asking copies of bill and vouchers and names of persons who have paid wages in the construction of school ,Dispensaries ,Small Check -Dams and Community Centers. After getting information, the villagers came to know that most of the public funds were misused as most of the school buildings were roofless ,dispensaries were without wall, check dams were left incomplete and community centers had no doors and windows. Mazdoor Kishan Sagnthan raised famous salogons like “Hamare Paisa, Hamara Hisha” and “Hum Janege, Hum Jiyenge ”.The movement spread to various parts of Himachal Pradesh, leading to a nationwide movement for the RTI Act and related state Legislations. This is the important movement which helped to implement the RTI Act in India. Tamil Nadu was the first state to introduce the right to information Act bill in 1997 in the legislative assembly. In 2000, due to the efficient and mass campaign of Mazdoor Kishan Sagnthan, Himachal Pradesh Govt. enforced the RTI Act.2005on dated 12 th October 2005. After that many states like Karnataka (2000), Delhi (2001), Maharashtra (2002) ,Madhya Pradesh (2003),and Assam(2002) implemented the RTI Act. During that time, the government of India Took necessary steps to enforced this Act by forming committees, discussing with social parties and activities, and gathering public opinion etc. Finally in December 2004, the RTI bill was introduced in the parliament and was immediately referred to a parliamentary Committee. Later in May 2005, the RTI bill was passed by both houses of parliament and in June 2005 RTI bill got the assent of the President of India .At last, the RTI Act came into force on 12 th October 2005.
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ROLE OF CHIEF INFORMATION COMMISSIONER IN IMPLEMENTING RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005

ROLE OF CHIEF INFORMATION COMMISSIONER IN IMPLEMENTING RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005

The enactment of the Right to Information Act, 2005, has ushered a new era in the history of Indian democracy, which is meant to protect citizens’ right to information. The right to inform and to be informed is enshrined in the constitutions of many countries of the world. 1 But in Indian Constitution, it is not explicit, though it has been recognized in general as part of the right of freedom of expression under Article 19(l) (a) of the Constitution. 2 The credit should be given to the NGO-Mazdoor Kissan Shakti Sangathan (MKSS) of Rajasthan for carrying on an agitation in 1994-95 against the government to make available information of the work done in their villages under the funds sanctioned for various development projects; and sensitizing the rural people about the need for it (the right to information). The slogan was: Hamara paisa, Hamara hisab (our money, our account). The Rajasthan Government ultimately introduced a version of an Access to Information Bill in the Legislative Assembly. 3 Taking the cue from Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh followed the suit. Ultimately the Central Government initiated the Bill under the Common Minimum Programme.
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Enactment of Right to Information Act in Bangladesh

Enactment of Right to Information Act in Bangladesh

to include the issue in their election manifestos and work actively towards establishing the right to know. The draft law was made on the basis of a working paper on proposed Right To Information Act 2002 prepared by the Law Commission. Defining the ‘right to information’, the draft law says every person shall have the right to information held by or under the control of any public authority. It has been mentioned by Rahman, “The public authority shall maintain all its records and make available to any citizen requesting information from it and shall not withhold any information or limits its availability.” (Rahman, 2007: 23). The Commission recommended promulgating a law to make provisions for people’s right to have access and the registered NGOs, enable the people to hold the government accountable for redress of their grievances and to cast a duty on the government and NGOs to keep people informed proactively on issues important for their well-being. It has also been said that government could not justify elevation of secrecy into a state principle, and by transparency, we would understand open governance, not open files. Ensuring access to information would not only benefit the press and media but also ensure empowerment of the people as well as improve their livelihood (Rahman, 2007).
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A STUDY ON THE COVERAGE OF RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 (RTI) IN NEWSPAPERS

A STUDY ON THE COVERAGE OF RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 (RTI) IN NEWSPAPERS

The Indian Parliament had enacted the “Freedom of Information Act, 2002” in order to promote, transparency and accountability in administration. The National Common Minimum Program of the Government envisaged that “Freedom of Information Act” will be made more “progressive, participatory and meaningful”, following which, decision was made to repeal the “Freedom of Information Act, 2002” and enact a new legislation in its place. Accordingly, “Right to Information Bill, 2004” (RTI) was passed by both the Houses of Parliament on May, 2005 which received the assent of the President on 15th June, 2005. “The Right to Information Act” was notified in the Gazette of India on 21st June, 2005. The “The Right to Information Act” became fully operational from 12th October, 2005. This new law empowers Indian citizens to seek any accessible information from a Public Authority and makes the Government and its functionaries more accountable and responsible.
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MANUAL UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 TAMIL NADU MINORITIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION LTD.,

MANUAL UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 TAMIL NADU MINORITIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION LTD.,

1.1 In order to promote transparency and accountability in the working of every public authority and to empower the citizens to secure access to information under the control of each public authority, the Government of India have enacted The Right to Information Act, 2005, (RTI Act) which came into force on 15.06.2005. In accordance with the provisions of section 4(1) (b) of this Act, the TAMIL NADU MINORITIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION has brought out this manual for information and guidance of the shareholders and the general public.
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RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT AND HIGHER JUDICIARY IN INDIA

RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT AND HIGHER JUDICIARY IN INDIA

The people of India got a very good tool in the form of Right to Information Act to ensure transparency in the public working, but all depend upon its proper implementation. If an executive is not working properly then we can trust the judiciary, but who will tackle the judiciary when it is not ready to consider their responsibility towards the nation in terms of RTI. The higher judiciary should understand its responsibility towards the nation. They must know that how much trust the people of this country repose in them and they must keep themselves above any sort of suspicion. Ultimately, government of India consists of three wings i.e. legislative, executive and judiciary. Hence judiciary, irrespective of higher or lower, is well within the need for transparency. This fact should be understood by our higher judiciary. The higher judiciary should recognize its responsibility towards the people’s right to information. It is the right time for the judiciary to introspect and save its independence, which it itself has established as part of the basic structure of the Constitution of India. References
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Manual Under Right To Information Act, 2005

Manual Under Right To Information Act, 2005

• A person who desires to obtain any information under sub-section 1 of section 6 of the Right to Information Act, 2005, shall make a request in writing or through electronic means in English or Tamil either in person or by post to the Public Information Officer mentioned in paragraph 1.5 above specifying the particulars of the information sought by him or her. Such application must be accompanied by an application fee of Rs.10/- (Rupees ten only) by cash or by demand draft or banker’s cheque drawn in favour of TANSIDCO.

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RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 MANUAL GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE DEPARTMENT

RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT, 2005 MANUAL GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT COOPERATIVE DEPARTMENT

Primary Cooperative Stores including students Coop. Stores, Cooperative Wholesale Stores and Tamil Nadu Consumer Cooperative Federation functioning in Tamil Nadu are societies registered / deemed to have been registered under the Tamil Nadu Cooperative Societies Act 1983. They are body corporate. They have their own registered offices. Their functioning is governed by their own registered bylaws, besides the provision of the T.N.C.S. Act and Rules. Their management vests in a board constituted in accordance with the Tamil Nadu Cooperative Societies Act, 1983 Tamil Nadu Cooperative Societies Rules 1988 and their own bylaws. At present, Primary Cooperative Stores, except Student Stores, Cooperative Whole Sale Stores and Tamil Nadu Consumer Cooperative Federation are managed by Special Officers. In the case of students Cooperative Stores, their management is looked after by a duly elected board consisting of Students also with the Headmaster / Principal as Ex- Officio President. A copy of the registered bylaws and a Register of its members and a copy of the Cooperative Societies Act and Rules are kept at the registered address of the society. They appoint their own employees to the extent required to carry on their business. The categories of their strength, qualifications for appointment, their scale of pay and allowances, the mode of appointment and other service conditions are governed by the Special bylaws relating to the service conditions of their employees adopted by them. The duties and responsibilities of the various categories of employees are as specified in the Special bylaws of the stores.
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The Role Of Right To Information Act (Rti) In Indian Development

The Role Of Right To Information Act (Rti) In Indian Development

The Right to Information (RTI) has acquired a universal status / recognition. The intergovernmental organisations, civil society and many sections of the people have immensely contributed to this epoch making development. RTI is now being widely recognised as a Fundamental Human Right. It not only upholds inherent dignity of all human beings, but also forms the crucial underpinning of participatory democracy, enduring accountability and promotes good governance. It is now widely recognized that democracy to be meaningful ought to be based on the notion of an informed public participating thoughtfully in its own governance Information and knowledge are the instruments for transformation because these enable public to engage their representatives and the bureaucracy on an ongoing basis and to participate effectively in the formulation and implementation of policies and activities purportedly for their benefit. An empowered citizenry tends to make administration more accountable and participatory. It also ensures greater transparency and acts as a deterrent against the arbitrary exercise of official powers.
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The right to information act in India: the turbid world of transparency reforms

The right to information act in India: the turbid world of transparency reforms

164 exemplified by the phrase “Ya tho jack ho, ya cheque ho...” (Roy and Dey, 2002: 79). The phrase means that to achieve anything beyond the usual pale, one must have either connections (someone to push you up, much like a vehicle is ‘jacked’ up) or money. Although no critique suggests that the latter was used by the leadership of the RTI ‘movement’, 236 that they possessed and used ‘jack’ for pushing for the enactment of the RTI Act has been consistently articulated earlier in this chapter. In a profoundly ironical way then, the strategies employed by the leadership, by virtue of their belonging to an elite fraction, thus appear to strengthen those very structural inequities that the movement purported to subvert. A recent unpublished doctoral thesis also speaks of a similar disjuncture in the context of transparency activism in Delhi. “Activist campaigns to get transparency and accountability legislation passed rely in part on the personal connections to the highest levels of government of activists from India’s social elite... Social and cultural capital, space, class and gender distinctions emerge as significant factors in the everyday practice of activism, in turn reproducing existing social hierarchies in activist organisations” (Webb, 2010a: 3). This leads us to another difficult question. Can the use of strategies, spaces and actions available exclusively to an elite fraction of society, therefore making the process inherently undemocratic, bring in meaningful democratic deepening? Judging by the responses of the leadership to this vexed question (as mentioned earlier in this chapter), an awareness of this irony exists, even as it is explained by the imperatives of realpolitik and the necessity for strategic action. Had these ‘undemocratic’ strategies not been adopted, perhaps an RTI Act would not have been enacted at all. To extrapolate from Bourdieu, the ‘rules of the game’ have to be first understood (and played with) before they can be broken. The instrumental impulse thus appears to have won in the end.
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ISSUES AND SUGGESTIONS FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INDIA’S RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005 IN LIGHT OF THE LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES’ EXPERIENCE

ISSUES AND SUGGESTIONS FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INDIA’S RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005 IN LIGHT OF THE LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES’ EXPERIENCE

It would be proper for the Freedom of Information Law to include the following assimilation encouraging mechanisms: broad definitions of those who are entitled to the information and the entities who are duty-bound to provide it; the appointment of an effective Freedom of Information Commission to supervise implementation of the law; the establishment of a user-friendly procedure for submitting applications; the obligation of public authorities to actively assist applicants in the process of submitting applications; the arrangement of a simple and inexpensive method of appealing against refusals to provide information; the obligation of the authorities to initiate the publication of information; emphasis on the duty to consider the public interest in the publication of information, even when it falls under the exemptions specified in the Law; the allocation of budgets to the Commission or other entities to execute advertising campaigns that will encourage the public to make use of the Law; the imposition of sanctions on government officials who do not comply with the provisions of the Law; furthermore, the Freedom of Information Law should not contain the following assimilation inhibiting mechanisms: complex procedures for submitting applications for information; inordinately long periods for providing a response to a request for information; limited timetables for filing appeals; fees imposed on the actual submission of the application (other than fees for the production of information); administrative exemptions enabling the authority to refrain from allocating sufficient resources to implement the aims of the Law; definitions of material exemptions that are too broad; broad protections of the interests of third parties which entered into contracts with the public authority.
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TAMIL NADU VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES UNIVERSITY PRO-ACTIVE DISCLOSURES UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005

TAMIL NADU VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES UNIVERSITY PRO-ACTIVE DISCLOSURES UNDER RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT 2005

The scientific competence and excellence of past performance in conducting various research programmes led to fiscal support from various National and International organizations / agencies. The University maintained close liaison with various National and International organizations to exchange information and acquired current and advanced knowledge in veterinary, animal sciences and fisheries sectors for dissemination Research Co-ordination and Management

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Directorate of Medical Education. Hand Book on Right to Information Act

Directorate of Medical Education. Hand Book on Right to Information Act

1. The Private Self Finaning Educational Trust / Charitable Trust / Society which is registered under relevant act and proposes to open unaided self financing nursing college alone should be considered for granting permission to start B.Sc., Nursing course and obtain prior permission from Government of Tamil Nadu, before applying to the Tamil Nadu Dr. MGR Medical Universitty and Indian Nursing Council, New Delhi or any other body for recognition / affiliation. A copy of the Registered Trust Deed oR Registration under societies Act should be furnished.

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Right to Information Act- 2005

Right to Information Act- 2005

In recognition of the need to promote transparency in public affairs and to curb corruption, the parliament exacted the RTI Act in 2005. It is a path breaking legislation to empower the people specially the weaker sections of the population while right to information is guaranteed by the constitution, the Act sets out the practical regime for citizens to secure access to information on all matters of governance. The Act is thus a landmark initiative to mark the public administration accountable and the decision- making process participatory.
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RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT : A DEMOCRATIC WEAPON

RIGHT TO INFORMATION ACT : A DEMOCRATIC WEAPON

Information is often withheld even when people are engaged in exercising the most basic of democratic rights, the vote. In the absence of a continuous flow of information it is difficult to know as to how ministries are functioning, how politicians have performed or the experience and qualifications of new candidates. In the absence of such information, elections may end up promoting only narrow interests as voters fall back on caste, religious or class affiliations as the basis for their choice. Likewise, in the absence of a right to scrutinize the financial details of political party funding—some of it no more than bribes—citizens are unable to ensure that special interest groups, including criminal elements, do not co-opt their representatives for private gain. Better-informed voters mean better-informed choices, more responsive legislators and better governance.
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Right to Information Act, 2005

Right to Information Act, 2005

time of deciding any complaint or appeal is of the opinion that the Central Public Information Officer or the State Public Information Officer, as the case may be, has, without any reas[r]

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