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Immersive and Temporal Experiences in Historic Landscapes: Designing a Mobile Digital Guide for the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne

Immersive and Temporal Experiences in Historic Landscapes: Designing a Mobile Digital Guide for the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne

Guilfoyle’s contributions persist to the present day, and the thematics can be explored in plant material, path alignments, structures and the views and vistas created by landform and the centrally located ornamental lake (Watts, 1983, p 62). The scale of these topographic works, combined with the substantial road and earthworks around the river, is reflective of public park-making in the mid-nineteenth century around the world, with places such as Central Park in new york and parc des Buttes chaumont in paris illustrating how marginal sites were transformed for public recreational use. Toward the end of the nineteenth century, the RBGM also provided the impetus for sweeping changes in a bid to beautify Melbourne around the time of Australia’s federation. In the early years of the twentieth century, the area between the gardens and river front was formalised with the laying out of avenues and gardens and construction of several commemorative imperial statues (Whitehead, 1997, pp 52–62).
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Additional notes on Cistanthe philhershkovitziana Hershk. (Montiaceae)

Additional notes on Cistanthe philhershkovitziana Hershk. (Montiaceae)

philhershkovitziana were found in digital collections of three herbaria: E (Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh 2018), K (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2018), and NY (New York Botanical Gard[r]

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Charles Weldon (de Burgh) Birch (Count Zelling), an unassuming botanical and zoological collector in central and north-eastern Queensland.

Charles Weldon (de Burgh) Birch (Count Zelling), an unassuming botanical and zoological collector in central and north-eastern Queensland.

Charles Weldon (de Burgh) Birch (Count Zelling) (1821-94) was an amateur botanical and zoological collector active in central and north-eastern Queensland 1852-93. He was the embodiment of the wandering naturalist, but as with most amateur collectors he remained on the fringe of ‘official’ science. Birch’s first documented zoological collections were land and freshwater shells collected in 1857 at the Namoi River. He went on to collect freshwater invertebrates, fishes, insects, gastropods and later reptiles, a total of at least 60 specimens which were mainly sent to the Australian Museum and later the Queensland Museum. His first documented botanical collection, a Nymphaea sp. from Thomson River, was made in 1870, and was collected with the encouragement of Baron Ferdinand von Mueller, Victorian Government Botanist, and the most eminent Australian botanist of the nineteenth century. About 760 botanical specimens collected by Birch are extant, most of which are in the Herbarium of the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. A significant early influence on Birch’s later activities was Samuel Stutchbury, New South Wales Government Geological Surveyor to whom Birch acted as assistant 1852-55 and for whom he anonymously collected palaeontological, mineralogical and zoological specimens as part of his field-work duties. In 1870, Birch became involved in the search for the lost explorer Ludwig Leichhardt, and was commissioned by the Ladies’ Search Committee to undertake an expedition to investigate a possible survivor of Leichhardt’s missing party living in the Thomson/Diamantina Rivers area. The search revealed no positive evidence of Leichhardt or his party. Birch took on additional names which he related to his ancestry, ‘de Burgh’ in 1871 and ‘Count Zelling’ in 1874, and which he used in official documents, written works and specimen labels. Based on specimens that he collected, Birch is commemorated in four plant and animal taxa including the Galvanised Burr, Sclerolaena birchii (F.Muell.) Domin; the Gidgee Skink, Egernia stokesii zellingi De Vis, 1884; the Proserpine Dual-banded Snail, Bentosites birchi Iredale, 1933 [Sphaerospira gavisa Iredale, 1933]; and a clam-shrimp Limnadopsis birchii Baird, 1860. Including the above eponymous taxa, Birch collected the type specimens of bryophytes (2 taxa), lichens (2), angiosperms (14), gastropods (1), branchiopod crustaceans (1), insects (1) and reptiles (5).
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William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

Because the curator’s salary was so low, the So­ ciety had difficulty in finding a suitable man for the post. Between 1851 and 1872 there were seven cura­ tors (Strey n.d.). The best known and the longest serving of these was a Scot named Mark Johnston McKen who was curator from 1851 to 1853 and again from 1860 to 1872 {Natal Colonist 23 April 1872; Na­ tal Mercury 25 April 1872). McKen did much for the economic development of Natal but failed to lay out a proper botanic garden. When he died in March 1872, leaving his wife and six children destitute, the Horticultural Society resolved to employ a curator who, unlike McKen, would devote his whole ener­ gies to the garden. As they could find no one suit­ able in the colony they wrote to Sir Joseph Hooker, the director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, requesting him to recommend a replacement for McKen {Natal Government Notice No. 191; 1872). Hooker had recently been impressed by a young German gardener named Julius Wilhelm Keit, or WiUiam Keit as he called himself in the EngUsh- speaking world, who at the time was employed at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, outside Dublin (Strey 1972; 1974).
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Nova pesquisa sobre as coleções de Richard Spruce na Amazônia: uma colaboração Brasil Reino Unido

Nova pesquisa sobre as coleções de Richard Spruce na Amazônia: uma colaboração Brasil Reino Unido

Em julho de 2015, 20 participantes do Brasil e Reino Unido se reuniram em uma oficina no Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, para estabelecer uma rede de pesquisadores, assim como desenvolver estratégias e possíveis propostas de pesquisas e repatriação digital das coleções bioculturais, integrando-as às exsicatas coletadas por Richard Spruce na Amazônia brasileira. Na ocasião, foram identificados os principais parceiros, além de ter sido desenvolvida uma agenda de pesquisa concentrada em uma melhor compreensão das relações dinâmicas entre pessoas e os recursos naturais nos últimos 200 anos, sintetizada em quatro grandes temas relacionados à Amazônia: mudanças ambientais e humanas; a relação entre as pessoas e seu ambiente; questões históricas, geográficas e sociológicas relacionadas à compreensão, gestão e ao potencial das coleções de Spruce; e, mais amplamente, à mobilização de coleções de museus e metadados junto às comunidades indígenas.
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Contributions to a catalogue of alien plants in Tasmania III

Contributions to a catalogue of alien plants in Tasmania III

2011: New South Wales Flora Online Pittosporum crassifolium, In PlantNET - The Plant Information Network System of The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, Sydney, Australia.. eds: Fl[r]

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Index Catalog // Carolina Digital Repository

Index Catalog // Carolina Digital Repository

Royal Botanic Gardens Kew Seed Information Database (SID) 2008 125 Cephalanthus occidentalis Shrub Native General wet acidic Water Schneider and Shartiz 1988 126 Cerastium font[r]

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Articles

Articles

Ruehssia woodburyana is a rare plant species restricted to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the British Virgin Islands (BVI). This species was originally described occurring exclusively at Caña Gorda within the Guánica State Forest in Guánica municipality on the island of Puerto Rico (Acevedo-Rodriguez 1999, Acevedo-Rodríguez 2005). Herbarium collections and observations dating from 2007 to 2017 (Suppl. material 1) reveal that this species also grows in other southern coastal municipalities of Puerto Rico: Peñuelas, Lajas and Cabo Rojo (Segarra et al. 2014). There are also herbarium collections from the islands of Mona and Culebra in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. In 2017, a team of botanists from the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, the National Parks Trust of the Virgin Islands, US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of Puerto Rico and the University of Puerto Rico (Mayagüez Campus) came across fertile material of a similar vine on Norman Island, an island on the south-western edge of the British Virgin Islands (BVI) archipelago (Hamilton and Barrios 2017). This vine was vouchered (M.A. Hamilton, #1738, K000860152, K!) and later confirmed as R. woodburyana (O. Monsegur pers. comm. 2017). This species extent of occurrence (EOO) was estimated to be 5,649 km and the area of occupancy to be 32 km based on a 2×2 km cell size (Bachman et al. 2011).
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“Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Lavender Oil Using HRBC Membrane Stabilising Method” by Karthik E.V.G, Dr V. Vishnu Priya, R. Gayathri, India.

“Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Lavender Oil Using HRBC Membrane Stabilising Method” by Karthik E.V.G, Dr V. Vishnu Priya, R. Gayathri, India.

1) “World Checklist of Selected Plant Families: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew”. The Genus Lavandula. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti- inflammatory effects of lavender essenti[r]

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OBITUARY

OBITUARY

He was adamant that the name Kirstenbosch should be advertised as widely as possible in botanical circles and among the public. To this end he organised a very successful celebration in 1963 of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Kirstenbosch. A number of prominent overseas botanists, especially ones connected with botanic gardens, were brought to South Africa for the celebrations and subsequent tour of the country. These included Sir George Taylor, Director of the world famous Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Britain (Figure 3), and Prof. Richard Howard of the Arnold Arboretum, United States.
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Flora Tasmaniae: Tasmanian naturalists and imperial botany, 1829 1860

Flora Tasmaniae: Tasmanian naturalists and imperial botany, 1829 1860

permission to cite material from the following collections: the archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; the Linnean Society of London; the Natural History Museum, London; the Royal Society of London; the Royal Horticultural Society of London, Lindley Library; the Mitchell Library, Sydney; the National Library of Australia; the National Herbarium of Victoria, the Archives Office of Tasmania; the State Library of Tasmania; the Allport Library and Museum of Fine Art; Tasmanian Herbarium (Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery); the University of Tasmania Library; the Royal Society of Tasmania; the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston; and Ian and Jill Wilson’s collection including transcriptions of Gunn family correspondence by Jack Curtis.
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Economic performance of small ruminant production in a protected area: a case study from Tell Ar-Rumman, a Mediterranean ecosystem in Jordan

Economic performance of small ruminant production in a protected area: a case study from Tell Ar-Rumman, a Mediterranean ecosystem in Jordan

This paper discusses the qualitative impact of a grazing/herding management program on the profitability of Small Ruminant (SR) herds near the protected area of the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Tell Ar-Rumman, Jordan. As the ultimate goal of establishing a protected area is to rehabilitate and enhance vegetation cover in a sustainable manner, a unique program was set up to meet the needs of local herders and enable the RBG to pursue its biodiversity conservation goals. Financial data pertaining to five local herders were recorded using the accrual accounting system and analyzed for the years 2009 and 2010. Significant changes occurred in the productivity and profitability of the SR herds, with the herders ’ net incomes increasing by 6% to 159% as a result of direct and indirect support provided by the RBG in 2010. The grazing/herding management program is not only improving the income of participating pastoralists, but is also contributing to the growth and conservation of vegetation and wildlife in Tell Ar-Rumman.
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Food plants and foraging distances for the native bee Lasioglossum sordidum in Christchurch Botanic Gardens

Food plants and foraging distances for the native bee Lasioglossum sordidum in Christchurch Botanic Gardens

We successfully identified over 99% of pollen grains taken from the sample L. sordidum bees returning to two nesting sites in the Botanic Gardens. While individuals were specialists, the collective populations of L. sordidum were generalist foragers as individuals varied in their plant choices, travelling at least 70–250 m to collect from a range of both native and exotic pollen types. Although there could be further cryptic foraging diversity in pollen taxa containing multiple plant species, even the flower diversity confirmed here shows that Lasioglossum sordidum visit the flowers of a wide range of plant species. These native bees are so small they are often overlooked, but they could be making an important contribution to pollination.
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Recollection of the Historical Portuguese Orchid Collection from 1879

Recollection of the Historical Portuguese Orchid Collection from 1879

Abstract: A new orchid house was built before 1879 in Portugal (Ajuda, Lisboa) for the orchid collection of the King Luis I of Portugal. That house was designed using the best technical solutions of that time. The orchid collection of 438 different orchids, almost all of which were natural species was clearly larger than most collections in botanic gardens in Europe and other non tropical areas then and today. After the Lisbon Regicide, the murder of King Carlos I of Portugal, the follower of King Luis I, the Botanic Garden of Ajuda including the orchid collection was transferred from The Royal administration to the University of agriculture and the collection started to decline and disappeared completely. A private family (Tuulikki and Pekka Ranta), who transported their collection of about 10000 orchids from Finland to Portugal (2011) has decided and promised to recollect that historical orchid collection in such a way, that the collection can be visited and studied a reasonable long time in the future. The recollection is planned to be completed during 2021, 140 years after the complete list of the orchid collection of King Luis I was signed.
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G., PRASLIÈKA J. (2002): Occurrence and harmful effects of Gymnosporangium sabinae (Dicks.) Winter in Slo-

G., PRASLIÈKA J. (2002): Occurrence and harmful effects of Gymnosporangium sabinae (Dicks.) Winter in Slo-

As part of the project “Biological-ecological bases for the creation and preservation of greenery in urban and production landscape” we evaluated the external factors that influence quality and quantity of greenery at select- ed locations in Slovakia. These included the important dendrological facilities (arboreta, botanical gardens and parks), public and private greenery in towns, gardening plots and private gardens. Part of the task was to deter- mine the parasitic mycoflora on selected woody plant species, with members of the genus Juniperus amongst them.

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Three snails in a slugfest

Three snails in a slugfest

The presence of A. inversus in Singapore has been mentioned in lit­ erature as far back as the 1800s (von Martens, 1867; Tenison-Woods, 1888; Fulton, 1896). Recent authors (Chan, 1996; Maassen, 2001; Chou & Tan, 2008; Lok & Tan, 2008; Tan et al, 2012) have also described its presence in Singapore, but all texts, past and present, do not specifically mention SBG as a habitat. The first known written record of this species as occurring in SBG came from the 1961 Annual Report of the Gardens: "During the year the Director of the National Museum, Singapore, found a thriving colony of Amphidromus inversus (Muller) on the trees by the Potting Yard. This snail known to occur in the Riau islands is but dubiously reporred from Malaya in a
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Begonia yapenensis (sect. Symbegonia, Begoniaceae), a new species from Papua, Indonesia

Begonia yapenensis (sect. Symbegonia, Begoniaceae), a new species from Papua, Indonesia

INDONESIA. Cultivated collection 20 Aug. 2014, Barber SBAR86 (holo-: BO; iso-: E, MAN). Cultivated in the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh from vegetative material collected in the wild (Accession 20090830: Indonesia, Papua Province, Yapen Island, Ambaidiru, 1000 m, 18 Feb. 2009, Argent, Barber, Ensoll & Galloway ABEG211).

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The Light Fantastic : Irish Stained Glass Art

The Light Fantastic : Irish Stained Glass Art

2004 Women’s International Glass Workshop & Exhibition, Toronto, Canada Boyle Arts Festival, Roscommon, Ireland Sculpture in Context, Botanic Gardens, Dublin C2, Crawford Gallery, Cork..[r]

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The foundation years of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 1843 86

The foundation years of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 1843 86

Sir John Eardley-Wilmot, Franklin's successor, set up the Van Diemen's Land Horticultural and Botanical Society­ later the Royal Society - because he felt that he could not maintain the Colonial Gardens at his own expense but did not want to see them abandoned. The Society, which was to administer the Gardens, financed by a Government grant, was to operate under rules based on the Linnaean and Horticultural Society in England. The Governor sought Royal patronage for this new body. Eardley-Wilmot had accepted presidency of the Tasmanian Society but then appeared to decide that it should be the nucleus of his new Society. The 37 resident Tasmanian Society members were entitled to be among the first fifty foundation Fellows of the Society. But they objected to having to pay an entrance fee and all but five ( and many of the invited prospective new members) walked out of the initial meeting in October 1843. Eardley-Wilmot was left with 18 people for his new Society. The Society's aim was "to develop the physical character of the Island and illustrate its natural history and production".3 Under the 1843 rules Fellows had access to the Gardens, Museum and Library and might take visitors to these places. Ladies were to be admitted as Fellows "upon the same terms, with the same privileges and under the same regulations in all respects as gendemen".4
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Proceedings of the Royal Society for the month of August, 1885

Proceedings of the Royal Society for the month of August, 1885

Plants and seeds received at and sent from the Royal Society's Gardens during the month of July, 1885 To Messrs.. Shepherd and Co.[r]

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