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The Implementation of Patient Safety Goals by Nurses Post Accredited Hospital in Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia

The Implementation of Patient Safety Goals by Nurses Post Accredited Hospital in Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia

Abstract:- Patient safety goals implementation is one of the indicators of the quality assurance system of assessment (accreditation) nursing services at hospital. This research aims to know the implementation of patient safety goals by nurses after the accreditation of hospital in Palembang, South Sumatra. This research is a quantitative research using survey method of analytic with 96 sample nurse who performed on the March to may in 2018 using a questionnaire. The method of sampling non-probability sampling method with the total sampling techniques. Analysis of univariate data using independent variables were analyzed using standard scoring 80% based on a standard assessment of the Committee on Accreditation of hospitals. The results showed the implementation of patient safety goals category either (84.4%) with details of identification accuracy good 70.8%, effective communication good 94.8%, the security of good medicine 76.0%, exactly the procedure, the patient's good operating location 87.5%, reduction of risk of infection both 50.0% patient fall risk reduction and good 51.0%. Expected to the hospital to build awareness of the importance of patient safety by supporting nurses in integrating activity oriented on patient safety.
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Nursing Supervision Model toward Patient Safety Goals On The Ward

Nursing Supervision Model toward Patient Safety Goals On The Ward

It reported 22 patient safety incidents in 2016. Unexpected incident (KTD) is one case, no injuries incident (KTC) are three cases, and almost injuries incidents are 18 cases. Moreover, 11 cases occurred in the intensive care room and others occurred in the ward. Besides recording incidents reported, monitoring six patient safety goals was also done based on PERMENKES 1691 year of 2011 in RSUD Tarakan [3]. According to PKMP (Panitia Mutu dan Keselamatan Pasien) / (Patient safety and quality committee) in 2016 it reported that the accession of first indicator about accuracy of patient identity was 99.00 % (goal 100 %), second indicator about effective communication (TBAK or Tulis Bacakan dan Konfirmasi) achieved 65.92 % (goal 100 %), third indicator about compliance of high alert label by pharmacy was 79.83 % (goal 100 %), fourth indicator about compliance of surgical safety to surgery patient was 100 % (goal 100%), the fifth indicator about allied health compliance, which is washing hands five moments, was 66.77 % (goal 80 %) and the sixth indicator about accident to patient incidents that cause disability was 0.01% (goal 0%).
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Challenges in the Application of Probabilistic Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants

Challenges in the Application of Probabilistic Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants

The use of safety goals is mostly understood to have had a positive impact from the PSA quality point of view. It seems that informal use of safety goals and cost-benefit evaluations is preferred by most in comparison to a situation with strictly enforced acceptance criteria. One perceived reason to avoid strict use of safety goals is that this might switch the attention from an open-minded assessment of plant safety to the mere fulfilment of safety goals. In order to fulfil safety goals, unnecessary conservatism needs to be avoided in the modelling, i.e., the basic aim should be to have realistic PSA models.
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National Patient Safety Goals Effective January 1, 2015

National Patient Safety Goals Effective January 1, 2015

There is no evidence that patient safety is affected by the job function of the individual who marks the site. The incidence of wrong-site surgery is low enough that it is unlikely that valid data on this subject will ever be available. Furthermore, there is no clear consensus in the field on who should mark the site. Rather than remaining silent on the subject of site marking, The Joint Commission sought a solution that supports the purpose of the site mark. The mark is a communication tool about the patient for members of the team. Therefore, the individual who knows the most about the patient should mark the site. In most cases, that will be the person performing the procedure. Recognizing the complexities of the work processes supporting invasive procedures, The Joint Commission believes that delegation of site marking to another individual is acceptable in limited situations as long as the individual is familiar with the patient and involved in the procedure. These include:
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National Patient Safety Goals Effective January 1, 2016

National Patient Safety Goals Effective January 1, 2016

Wrong site surgery should never happen. Yet it is an ongoing problem in health care that compromises patient safety. Marking the procedure site is one way to protect patients; patient safety is enhanced when a consistent marking process is used throughout the organization. Site marking is done to prevent errors when there is more than one possible location for a procedure. Examples include different limbs, fingers and toes, lesions, level of the spine, and organs. In cases where bilateral structures are removed (such as tonsils or ovaries) the site does not need to be marked.
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APPROVED: 2010 National Patient Safety Goals

APPROVED: 2010 National Patient Safety Goals

[AHC, BHC, CAH, HAP, LAB, LTC, OBS, OME: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year, mil- lions of people acquire an infection while receiving [care, treat- ment, and services] in a health care organization. Consequently, health care–associated infections (HAIs) are a [patient] safety issue affecting all types of health care organizations. One of the most important ways to address HAIs is by improving the hand hygiene of health care staff.] Compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) hand hygiene guidelines will reduce the transmission of infectious agents by staff to [patient]s, thereby decreasing the incidence of HAIs. To ensure compliance with this National [patient] Safety Goal, an organization should assess its compliance with the CDC and/or WHO guidelines
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Standards and National Patient Safety Goals: What s new for Critical Access Hospitals in 2012

Standards and National Patient Safety Goals: What s new for Critical Access Hospitals in 2012

standards and other performance measures related to medical staff, and credentialing and privileging for the hospital, ambulatory care, long term care, and behavioral health care manua[r]

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Toward ZERO Deaths. Kentucky Strategic Highway Safety Plan

Toward ZERO Deaths. Kentucky Strategic Highway Safety Plan

Kentucky is participating in a national effort to reduce preventable tragedies. The Kentucky Strategic Highway Safety Plan is a focused plan which outlines measurable strategic opportunities to reduce fatalities and serious injuries on our roadways. The first Strategic Highway Safety Plan in the state, published in 2006, described methods in which highway safety goals could be accomplished in 10 emphasis areas: Aggressive Driving, Commercial Vehicle Safety, Drive Smart Safety Corridors, Impaired Driving, Incident Management, Roadway Departure, Occupant Protection, Young Drivers, Traffic Records, and Legislative Issues. Two new emphasis areas were added in 2010 (Distracted Driving and Motorcycles), and an Intersection emphasis area is being included as part of this update. Responsibility for highway safety in Kentucky resides in the Office of Highway Safety in the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. This Office, in cooperation with many agencies across the state, has spearheaded several projects in engineering, education, enforcement, and emergency services in order to reduce the state’s collisions, serious injuries, and fatalities.
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Debra Tesch-Wallace_ICD -10 Presentation to TCC.pptx

Debra Tesch-Wallace_ICD -10 Presentation to TCC.pptx

• Quality measurement – Detailed data availability to assess quality standards, patient safety goals, mandates and compliance.. • Public health – Improved disease reporting and outbre[r]

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Patient Safety Plan. Effective Date: March 12, 2009 for

Patient Safety Plan. Effective Date: March 12, 2009 for

Providing periodic (monthly, quarterly etc) Report on specific sets of indicators is a routine essential of the Hospital Patient Safety Plan. The set up of indicators is done through internal and external metrics and approved by the Patient Safety Committee. Presently, we follow the guidelines of National Patient Safety Goals by the sentinel event advisory board of The Joint Commission, AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) indicators (20 Hospital- level PSI/ Patient Safety Indicator) etc. In any event, when we find that an error occurred, we revisit the issue and dedicate ourselves to mitigate the status through a risk reduction
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Psychosocial Safety Climate Predicts Health and Safety Status of Ghanaian Fuel Attendants

Psychosocial Safety Climate Predicts Health and Safety Status of Ghanaian Fuel Attendants

It is important to note that PSC is a policy-driven organisational variable within which other policies, procedures and practices are created, the aim is to increase the health and safety of the worker. Thus, both national and organisational level safety policies are important to reaching the health and safety goals of attendants. Within PSC, it is prudent that senior management makes effort to formulate policies that regulate their own safety activities. This safety policy should aim at giving priority to attendants’ safety compared to only increasing sales. Further, there should be conscious effect towards promoting of bottom-up safety communication where it is likely attendants would own decisions and take appropriate actions to affect them. Senior management needs to actively take part in all matters concerning health and safety issues at the fuel stations. They need to proactively train attendants in health and safety promotion and bring them on board in matters of safety. It is equally adequate to task sales executives and marketing managers of the OMCs and managers of fuel service stations to make effective policies and regulations that aim at enhancing the health and safety of the fuel station attendants. Fuel station policies have to promote effective worker cooperation including supervisor-worker interaction. There should always be plans to monitor PSC and prevent stress among the attendants.
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7 Things Your Board Can Do to Improve Quality and Patient Safety

7 Things Your Board Can Do to Improve Quality and Patient Safety

“Board members have to be educated about what is going on in the national environment on quality and safety, and then use those newly acquired skills to make sure the organization they are responsible for is measuring and delivering on its quality and safety goals,” says Nash. “Most boards fail on both steps. They don’t devote resources and precious time to education on quality and safety, and thus they lack the fundamentals to hold management’s [and clinicians’] seats to the fire regarding quality and safety.”

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Achieving an integrated approach to food safety and hygiene—meeting the sustainable development goals in Sub-Saharan Africa

Achieving an integrated approach to food safety and hygiene—meeting the sustainable development goals in Sub-Saharan Africa

Identification of priority areas for targeting resources may be based on two prerequisites. Firstly, in the commercial sector, an emphasis for support may be placed on leveraging market incentives to promote economic growth. However this cannot outweigh the estimation of burden of disease from specific sectors. The lack of an effective surveillance system in Malawi means it is difficult to determine the potential for disease from the commercial sector. However, we must also consider the significant role played by the informal sector on the burden of disease. Any pathway to reducing the burden of foodborne disease must recognise the role of household food preparation and consumption in this setting. As 93% of the rural population engage in and are primarily dependent on farming, day-to-day foods are either grown or purchased in small quantities from local markets and informal traders [48]. These areas are largely neglected in current food safety programmes, where the most vulnerable members of the population, including under fives, bear 40% of the foodborne-disease burden [2]. Recent outbreaks of cholera across Malawi and neighbouring countries have reinforced this need to address the informal market to control the spread of communicable diseases through poor food hygiene practices [49,50]. Further research is needed to understand the national burden of disease associated with food in Malawi and to evaluate the quality and safety of foods being consumed, if resources are to be effectively used to target high-risk areas. Nevertheless, in the first instance, the WHO (2015) Estimates of the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases is a detailed reference point for prioritisation [40].
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Pediatric Patient Safety in Emergency Departments: Unit Characteristics and Staff Perceptions

Pediatric Patient Safety in Emergency Departments: Unit Characteristics and Staff Perceptions

tors and staff perceptions of safety was limited. The sample size also pre- cluded multifactorial analyses to look for associations or confounding be- tween the studied ED characteristics. Because of the relatively small varia- tion across sites in mean safety cli- mate scores, statistical differences in perceptions of safety and ED charac- teristics should be interpreted as as- sociations to be examined further in the clinical setting. Despite the diver- sity of PECARN, the network is not rep- resentative of most hospital EDs where children seek care; therefore, our find- ings might be different from those for nonpediatric ED settings. Also, our case mixture was sicker than nation- ally representative samples such as that in the National Hospital Ambula- tory Medical Care Survey. 39 Therefore,
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TAKING CONTROL: PATHWAYS TO DRUG POLICIES THAT WORK

TAKING CONTROL: PATHWAYS TO DRUG POLICIES THAT WORK

opportunity to review and re-direct national drug control policies and the future of the global drug control regime. As diplomats sit down to rethink international and domestic drug policy, they would do well to recall the mandate of the United Nations, not least to ensure security, human rights and development. Health is the thread that runs through all three of these aspirations, and the UN global drug control regime has the ‘health and welfare of mankind’ as its ultimate goal. But overwhelming evidence points to not just the failure of the regime to attain its stated goals but also the horrific unintended consequences of punitive and prohibitionist laws and policies. A new and improved global drug control regime is needed that better protects the health and safety of individuals and communities around the world. Harsh measures grounded in repressive ideologies must be replaced by more humane and effective policies shaped by scientific evidence, public health principles and human rights standards. This is the only way to simultaneously reduce drug-related death, disease and suffering and the violence, crime, corruption and illicit markets associated with ineffective prohibitionist policies. The fiscal implications of the policies we advocate, it must be stressed, pale in comparison to the direct costs and indirect consequences generated by the current regime.
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09environmental.pdf

09environmental.pdf

meeting environmental quality goals, policy- makers in the United States have reassessed priorities, and are now emphasizing environ- mental health and safety as important policy.. guide[r]

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SCOPE: Safer care for older persons (in residential) environments: A study protocol

SCOPE: Safer care for older persons (in residential) environments: A study protocol

Funding for this study is provided through a contribution agreement with Health Canada (CA# 6804-15-2009/9180076). We gratefully acknowledge the British Columbia Quality Council for their financial contribution to the study. Production of this paper has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada. We thank Ms. Marlies van Dijk for sharing her expertise in quality improvement and assisting with the design and implementation of this study. Ms.van Dijk is Surgical Quality Leader, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, BC Patient Safety & Quality Council (formerly Safer Healthcare Now Western Node Leader during the development of the study).
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GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.docx

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.docx

If special education services are listed on the Educational Services page with minutes, there must be a goal for that skill area. This applies to special education and related services provided in general or special education classrooms. Services provided on a consultation basis, as indicated under the sections of “Supports for School Personnel” or “Supplementary Aids, Accommodations, or Accommodations” may not require goals and

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Delivering an In-Home Exercise Program via Telerehabilitation: A Pilot Study of Lung Transplant Go (LTGO)

Delivering an In-Home Exercise Program via Telerehabilitation: A Pilot Study of Lung Transplant Go (LTGO)

We evaluated the feasibility, safety, system usability, and intervention acceptability of Lung Transplant Go (LTGO), an 8- week in-home exercise intervention for lung transplant recipients using a telerehabilitation platform, and described changes in physical function and physical activity from baseline to post-intervention. The intervention was delivered to lung transplant recipients in their home via the Versatile and Integrated System for TeleRehabilitation (VISYTER). The intervention focused on aerobic and strengthening exercises tailored to baseline physical function. Participants improved walk distance (6-minute walk distance), balance (Berg Balance Scale), lower body strength (30-second chair stand test) and steps walked (SenseWear Armband®). No adverse events were reported. Participants rated the program highly positively in regard to the technology and intervention. The telerehabilitation exercise program was feasible, safe, and acceptable. Our findings provide preliminary support for the LTGO intervention to improve physical function and promote physical activity in lung transplant recipients.
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DYSPHAGIA GOALS LONG TERM GOALS - SWALLOWING

DYSPHAGIA GOALS LONG TERM GOALS - SWALLOWING

• The patient will demonstrate functional problem solving and safety awareness with ___% verbal, tactile and visual cues for daily living tasks in order to increase safe interaction wi[r]

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