The Seventh-Day Adventist/Lutheran split

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Seabrook Seventh-Day Adventist Church Seventh-Day Adventist School Education Assistance Policy

Seabrook Seventh-Day Adventist Church Seventh-Day Adventist School Education Assistance Policy

Final – April 2005 Seabrook Seventh-Day Adventist Church Seventh-Day Adventist School Education Assistance Policy The mission of the Seabrook SDA Education Department is to develop the whole child mentally, socially, physically, and spiritually and provide opportunities for them to be educated in a learning environment that exposes them to God and helps them to develop Christian character and values. In addition, our goal is to inspire and motivate the church to support Christian Education based on the belief that all true wisdom and knowledge comes from God.
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Kencot Seventh-day Adventist Church

Kencot Seventh-day Adventist Church

~~~Pastoral Notices Contd Birthday Celebrations Happy birthday to the following Church Family members at home and abroad who celebrate their special day TODAY and during the coming week. May you feel God’s extravagant love over your life as you live in the hope of the soon coming of Jesus Christ.

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A Perspective on Seventh-day Adventist Hermeneutics

A Perspective on Seventh-day Adventist Hermeneutics

The Adventist doctrine of the non-immortality of the soul is also framed within a rejection of neo-Platonic reality. We believe human life and existence cannot be without a physical body; that thought processes as well as emotions require a physical body. When the physical body dies, human existence enters a state of “sleep” until the day of the resurrection when human existence is reestablished or recreated. At death the breath of life God gives at birth returns to God until the resurrection. This breath of life, however, is not a self-existent ontological entity that represents the ultimate real- ity of human existence. Human beings don’t have a self-existent timeless soul that survives or yearns for a better life without a physi- cal body, as if God’s creation of the body had been a mistake, an afterthought, or a temporary necessity to experience salvation. In its own way Adventist theology is non-conformist at a very basic level of philosophical thought.
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Kencot Seventh-day Adventist Church

Kencot Seventh-day Adventist Church

Make contact: 876-929-2773; or kencotsdachurch@yahoo.com Birthday Celebrations Happy birthday to the following Church Family members at home and abroad who celebrate their special day TODAY and during the coming week. May you feel God’s extravagant love over your life as you live in the hope of the soon coming of Jesus Christ.

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Clapping In Seventh-Day Adventist Worship

Clapping In Seventh-Day Adventist Worship

Abstract Clapping is considered as a media of praise and thanks in Christian worship. Some give space to this practice while other reject it. This article tried to identify the biblical foundation of these ideas, and was carried out through the following phases: formulating the problem, preparing the title, and searching the related supporting materials in the library research and electronic facilities. The research focused on three main aspects: the clapping in the Bible, the Christian and practice of clapping in worship services, and clapping in Seventh-day Adventist Church. It is found that there is no Bible text and theological evidence which support the practice of clapping in the place of worship, in other words clapping in the church services is unbiblical, and for this reason clapping in Seventh-day Adventists worship services is not necessary. Instead of clapping, the use of amen is suggested in responding the message or musical presentation. Since clapping has become controversial issue in Adventist worship services, the church leaders need to instruct and guide the church members to the right understanding of clapping.
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Reasons Seventh-day Adventist Parents Gave for Not Sending Their Children to Seventh-day Adventist Elementary and Secondary Schools

Reasons Seventh-day Adventist Parents Gave for Not Sending Their Children to Seventh-day Adventist Elementary and Secondary Schools

necessarily, and in a lot of other ways— the way people behave, the dancing, the parties, and the whole thing. We have just lost it as an Adventist faith at this point. I really feel that we need to just step back and say what is important, and if that means that we do not have enough tuition in the school, let it be so. If it is going to be called an Adventist school, we need to have those values there, and we need to be enforcing those values, because some parents that are paying want those values. If you are going to pay that much money, and you are an Adventist that is sending your children there, you want to be served. Right now, we cannot differentiate between a child that goes to the Adventist school from one that goes to the public school. I really can’t, and I think that we should be set aside, not that we should not be going out into the world by any means, but the public should be able to tell that we are Adventists. At this point, the talk, the actions, I do not see any difference. I really don’t see any difference in the kids that I come in contact with. I do not think that we should be aggressive in telling and just being a rule to society but I do not think that we are sharing our faith with our children. I think we are too worried about hurting their feelings and that they might leave the church. We do not want the kids to leave the church, so we do not want to get them upset, because they may leave. We are told if you train up a child in the way that he should go, when he is old he would not depart from it. Right now we are not training them and they are flying out the door.
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History of Seventh-day Adventist Views on the Trinity

History of Seventh-day Adventist Views on the Trinity

During the first decades of the twentieth century, Adventists found themselves battling higher criticism and the “new modernism” growing in Christianity. Protestant Fundamentalists were resisting this trend, and Adventists often found themselves battling side by side with them against teaching evolution in public schools and against liberal efforts to undermine the authority of the Bible. Modern liberalism rejected the de- ity of Jesus and his virgin birth. As a result, Adventist articles defending the deity of Christ began to appear in church papers on a more frequent basis. Irrespective of individual differences on details, Adventist minis- ters pulled into line against dangerous liberal views.
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Seventh-day Adventist School, Hapur, India

Seventh-day Adventist School, Hapur, India

In 1964 the boarding students went to Roorkee which had also changed to English as the medium of instruction as leadership deemed it uneconomical to operate two boarding schools with similar purposes. Hapur continued as a day school till 1973 when it constructed new boarding facilities for boys. In 1974 the school added the eighth standard for day students only. Boarding students at that level still had to proceed to Roorkee. By 1987 the school had upgraded to the eleventh standard. When the Roorkee school started college-level courses and focused more on them, there appeared a need for the school at Hapur to provide more affordable education for workers’ and lay- members’ children. Limited boarding facilities for girls opened in the old principal’s bungalow in 2007.
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Continuing Education for Seventh-day Adventist Pastors

Continuing Education for Seventh-day Adventist Pastors

General Conference Ministerial Association Continuing Education: kenta@gc.adventist.org Page 12 8. Expectations. The pastor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church occupies the position and performs a very important role. Almost all other professionals (physicians, dentists, teachers, airline pilots etc.) are required to continually improve their skills and education so that they can continue to practice in their professions. The General Conference Ministerial Association recommends that each pastor completes a minimum of 2 CEUs each year – which is the equivalent of 20 hours of continuing education per year. In some world fields of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, completion of this minimum expectation is required to maintain continued employment as a local church pastor. In other fields, only pastors who have faithfully earned CEUs, are considered by nominating
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Perceptions of Character Education in a Seventh-Day Adventist School

Perceptions of Character Education in a Seventh-Day Adventist School

The administrator reflects: First, the experiences at home began with family worship. It was an integral part of family. We were encouraged to engage in personal, private devotion. Then, mother called the family together. My father did not lead in the worship setting. Mother ensured that we had family worship. I, now, see the benefit of character education, especially through Adventist Christian education. I did not have the opportunity to attend an Adventist School in my elementary years. My wife had that privilege. Growing up in the church and in Pathfinder ministry, I experienced the principles that were taught at home. As I became independent, I practiced those values at my home. I have taught them to my children who are attending school at this institution. Because of my training, we cherish certain values dearly: have respect for the aged, always tell the truth, try to be helpful in the community and within the family, and have love for each other. Those values I learned early as a child. At this point, respect, love, responsibility, veracity, and concern are some character traits that I have. Such traits of character have assisted me in acquiring this position (Reflections on the Past, p.1)
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Seventh-day-Adventist-Church-Manual-17th-edition

Seventh-day-Adventist-Church-Manual-17th-edition

24. Christ’s Ministry in the Heavenly Sanctuary There is a sanctuary in heaven, the true tabernacle which the Lord set up and not man. In it Christ ministers on our behalf, making available to believers the benefits of His atoning sacrifice offered once for all on the cross. He was inaugurated as our great High Priest and began His intercessory ministry at the time of His ascension. In 1844, at the end of the prophetic period of 2300 days, He entered the second and last phase of His atoning ministry. It is a work of investigative judgment which is part of the ultimate disposition of all sin, typified by the cleansing of the ancient Hebrew sanctuary on the Day of Atonement. In that typical service the sanctuary was cleansed with the blood of animal sacrifices, but the heavenly things are purified with the perfect sacrifice of the blood of Jesus. The investigative judgment reveals to heavenly intelligences who among the dead are asleep in Christ and therefore, in Him, are deemed worthy to have part in the first resurrection. It also makes manifest who among the living are abiding in Christ, keeping the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus, and in Him, therefore, are ready for translation into His everlasting kingdom. This judgment vindicates the justice of God in saving those who believe in Jesus. It declares that those who have remained loyal to God shall receive the kingdom. The completion of this ministry of Christ will mark the close of human probation before the Second Advent. (Heb. 8:1-5; 4:14-16;
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Church Officers. Cambridge Seventh-day Adventist Church

Church Officers. Cambridge Seventh-day Adventist Church

Health Ministries Leader—For planning and implementing an efficient program, the church elects a health ministries leader and, if needed, an associate leader.. The leader should be heal[r]

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Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

This study investigates the meanings and significance of the seventh-day Sabbath for worship in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In recent years, both the day and concept of Sabbath have attracted ecumenical attention, but the focus of scholarship has been placed on Sunday as the Lord’s Day or Sabbath with little consideration given to the seventh-day Sabbath. In contrast, this project examines the seventh-day Sabbath and worship on that day from theological, liturgical, biblical and historical perspectives. Although not intended as an apology for Seventh-day Adventist practices, the work does strive to promote a critical and creative conversation with other theological and liturgical traditions in order to promote mutual, ecumenical understanding.
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Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Boston University School of Theology, 2010 Major Professor: Karen B. Westerfield Tucker, Professor of Worship ABSTRACT This study investigates the meanings and significance of the seventh-day Sabbath for worship in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In recent years, both the day and concept of Sabbath have attracted ecumenical attention, but the focus of scholarship has been placed on Sunday as the Lord’s Day or Sabbath with little consideration given to the seventh-day Sabbath. In contrast, this project examines the seventh-day Sabbath and worship on that day from theological, liturgical, biblical and historical perspectives. Although not intended as an apology for Seventh-day Adventist practices, the work does strive to promote a critical and creative conversation with other theological and liturgical traditions in order to promote mutual, ecumenical understanding.
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Environmental Literacy of Seventh-day Adventist Teachers in the Parochial Schools of the Florida Conference of Seventh-day Adventists

Environmental Literacy of Seventh-day Adventist Teachers in the Parochial Schools of the Florida Conference of Seventh-day Adventists

Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2005, p. 117). The Southern Union Education Code, PreK-12 (2009) stated: The Seventh-day Adventist Church recognizes God as the ultimate source of existence and truth. In the beginning God created in His image, a perfect humanity, a perfection later marred by sin. Through the guidance of the Holy Spirit, God’s character and purposes can be understood as revealed in nature, the Bible, and Jesus Christ. The distinctive characteristics of Adventist education, derived from the Bible and the inspired writings of Ellen G. White, point to the redemptive aim of true education: to restore human beings into the image of their maker. . . . Adventist education seeks to develop a life of faith in God and respect for the dignity of all human beings; to build character akin to that of the Creator; to nurture thinkers rather than mere reflectors of others’ thoughts; to promote loving service rather than selfish ambition; to ensure maximum development of each individual’s potential; and to embrace all this is true, good, and beautiful. . . . It fosters a balanced development of the whole person—physically, intellectually, socially, and spiritually. Working together, homes, schools, and churches cooperate together with divine agencies in preparing learners for responsible citizenship in this world and in the world to come.
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Conversion and Identity in the Context of the Seventh-Day Adventist Faith Tradition

Conversion and Identity in the Context of the Seventh-Day Adventist Faith Tradition

C ONCLUSION This paper concludes that a relationally-internalised faith leads to a strong, positive, and secure Christian identity, for it flows from the transformational faith experience with God. Such identity is not grounded in activity or achievements, but in the heart of a missional God. Further, it argues that such an identity displays to the world what it means to be God’s people, and communicates what it means to have faith in God, in a language that flows from the heart, and speaks to the heart. On this journey, believers contextualise beliefs into life-applicable principles. In defining and expressing the heart of Seventh-day Adventist identity, the church needs to recapture the vision of how to cultivate astuteness to discern what God is already doing in the lives of people. It needs to discover the presence of a missional God, and enter into people’s lives as welcomed strangers, offering presence and attentiveness, helping them to discover the thriving hub of identity, personal worth, uniqueness, and potential.
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The Development of the First School of Nursing in the Seventh-day Adventist Church

The Development of the First School of Nursing in the Seventh-day Adventist Church

Profession, 71-73. Nightingale demanded clean dressings, clean bedding, well cooked, edible food, proper sanitation and fresh air. It was to these improvements that she attributed the lower death rate. Dietz and Lehozky, History and Modern Nursing, 63. Her work in the war included more than reforming the hospital and organizing comfort for thousands of soldiers. It had broken through an age-old prejudice and made the world realize that women were needed in every day in life. She had made the public see what good nursing meant and given the world a new conception of a woman’s n’s place in it. Goodnow, Nursing History in Brief, 87. Summarizing her thoughts about the great work she did for humanity, Josephine Dolan says the following: “Florence Nightingale cannot be considered as the product of her time, since she was ahead of and beyond it, but the season was ripe for her genius as the founder of modern nursing.” Dietz and Lehozky, History and Modern Nursing, 189.
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STEWARDSHIP - The 21st Fundamental Belief of the Seventh-day Adventist Church

STEWARDSHIP - The 21st Fundamental Belief of the Seventh-day Adventist Church

To the Christian, stewardship means “man's responsibility for, and use of, everything entrusted to him by God --- life, physical being, time, talents and abilities, material possessi[r]

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The art of maintaining a successful marriage in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

The art of maintaining a successful marriage in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Apart from monogamous marriage, the Bible describes polygamous marriage. The first polygamist mentioned in the Bible was Lameck (Gen. 4:19). Lameck describes his polygamous experience as similar to someone who is wounded (Gen.4: 23). Biblical heroes like King Saul, David and Solomon were polygamists (2 Sam. 3: 2-5; 1 Kings 11:1-8). Israel was “a society that tolerated polygamy, the possession of a large harem was a mark of wealth and power. It was also a luxury that few could afford, and it became a privilege of kings. Saul had at least one concubine ( 2 Sam. 3:7), and elsewhere there is mention of his wives ( 2 Sam. 12:8). Even when David was reigning in Hebron, he already had six wives (2 Sam. 5:13, 2 Sam.19:6), including Bathsheba (2 Sam. 11:27). When he fled from Absalom he left ten concubines in Jerusalem (2 Sam. 15: 16; 16:21- 22; 20:3). According to 2 Sam. ch 11:21, Roboam (Rehoboam) had eighteen wives and sixty concubines” (de Vaux 1978:115). Kraft (2003:306) says: “In Jewish and many traditional societies to this day, however, polygamy is considered legitimate marriage, not adultery”.
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A Friendship Evangelism Seminar for the Bladensburg Seventh-day Adventist Church

A Friendship Evangelism Seminar for the Bladensburg Seventh-day Adventist Church

INTRODUCTION Purpose of Dissertation Statement of the Problem One of the greatest needs in the local congregation is the need for close friendships. Individual case studies cite testimony of lonely people surrounded by uncaring members. These people want to be accepted, needed, heard, and loved. They believe the local church is cold, aloof, boring, condemning, unfriendly, and irrelevant to their social needs.1 Each year, Seventh-day Adventist members leave the fellowship o f the local church because of the lack of friends within the congregation. About half o f those who are baptized members in their mid-teens will drop out o f the church by the time they are halfway through their 20s.2 Adding to the frustration level of Adventist members is the lack of knowledge and experience in forming new friendships within the local church and leading friends outside the church into a personal relationship with Christ.3
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