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Visual Arts. The School of Arts and Humanities.

Visual Arts. The School of Arts and Humanities.

BFA = 80 ARTV credits of 128 total credit hours BA = 64 ARTV credits of 128 total credit hours Both degrees provide preparation for careers in the arts, graduate school, K-12 teaching (with additional studies in the Education program), and other careers. The BFA is a Fine Arts degree and is considered a professional degree in art and design. Its primary emphasis is on the development of skills, concepts, and sensitivities essential to the professional artist or designer. The BA is a Liberal Arts degree that allows a more even balance between the study of art and other academic disciplines. Visual arts preceptors (advisers) can allocate transfer credits, help students decide on a concentration, and help choose courses. Students may change preceptors to one specializing in their chosen discipline at any time. All visual art students must complete a Core Curriculum (prerequisite classes that cover the fundamentals of art history and studio art) before proceeding to a BFA or BA concentration. Art education students must complete their BFA or BA Senior Projects before proceeding to student teaching.
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Teaching visual arts: putting theory into practice

Teaching visual arts: putting theory into practice

For Hickman (2000) the individual art teacher remains the essential driving force for imaginative, creative and challenging arts education. He argues that the personal belief system of individual art teachers is the single most important factor in determining the nature of schools/centres’ art activities. I hope to encourage my colleagues to examine their current visual arts and culture practice, in partnership with me, in relation to the socio-cultural principles that underpin the early childhood curriculum in New Zealand and see if critical reflection on our practice results in a pedagogical shift in teaching. At the same time, I question whether in-service professional development courses currently offered by some providers need to be modified to include current theories, instead of concentrating on expressionist creative child-centred art theories.
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Visual arts education: The potential for teacher delight or despair

Visual arts education: The potential for teacher delight or despair

This study investigates whether the anxiety evidenced in the National Review of Visual Education (NRVE) (Davis, 2008), regarding generalist primary teachers, also impacts on preschool teachers’ delivery of Visual Arts. Taking a mixed- methods approach the study is organised in three interlocking stages, the first two of which seek to explore, at the preschool level, whether the findings of previous studies are replicated in preschools. The third and final stage, however, is designed to take the issue beyond previous studies to consider what might be done to address Arts anxiety at a local level while utilising only existing resources. Stage One uses both quantitative and qualitative questions to survey a sample of preschool teachers in Canberra, in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) in relation to their teaching, especially in the learning area of Visual Arts. The sample was obtained by the snowball method: 50 requests for participation in a confidential survey were dispatched by the researcher and 26 completed surveys were returned. Results from the survey showed that this, albeit limited, sample of preschool teachers also reported experiencing Art anxiety and a lack of confidence in teaching Visual Arts. The final question of the confidential survey invited respondents to indicate willingness to participate in Stage Two and, if so, to provide contact details. Ten teachers were then selected at random from the 25 who indicated willingness to proceed to Stage Two. This second stage was a 30 minute individual interview with questions designed to allow teachers to expand upon their survey responses and scope concerns and issues. All ten teachers who were interviewed wished to be selected to continue to Stage Three, an individualized professional learning experience (after Rogers (1969)), offered over three months in their place of work.
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Curriculum and Scheduling. Arts Area: VISUAL ARTS Grade Levels: KINDERGARTEN. Exemplars. Comments

Curriculum and Scheduling. Arts Area: VISUAL ARTS Grade Levels: KINDERGARTEN. Exemplars. Comments

4 Every school provides a set of visual art textbooks, published not more than 6 years previously, for every grade level. Teachers' editions of the textbooks with accompanying reproductions or slides, as well as other resource materials in visual arts, are readily available for visual arts educators and classroom teachers.

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Grade Evaluation Guide for Visual Arts Work

Grade Evaluation Guide for Visual Arts Work

The work involves a variety of visual arts projects, each with its own sequence of different technical processes. Themes or subjects, as well as the general format (medium, color scheme, overall dimensions, etc.) to be used, are already established or specified by others. The emphasis is on technical proficiency in the development of visual products. (This differs from the next lower level where projects involve either isolated tasks in producing a visual product or creating faithful copies of existing illustrations, models, or other visual products with specified minor changes.)
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Black Women in the Visual Arts: A Comparative Study

Black Women in the Visual Arts: A Comparative Study

Peirre-Noel, Lois Jones (1976) "Black Women in the Visual Arts: A Comparative Study," New Directions : Vol. Available at: http://dh.howard.edu/newdirections/vol3/iss2/6.[r]

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Navigating Curricular Change in the Visual Arts in Ontario

Navigating Curricular Change in the Visual Arts in Ontario

 I mean it all stems from the elementary level: that the amount of time and resources that have been invested in trying to teach to the test has impacted any subject that is not core so all the arts have been affected because they are not considered by a lot of people to be valuable. … I mean if you invest time in one thing it has to be cut from something else, so it’s always cut from the arts. It just cascades up the line right? So the fact that the kids don’t get adequate art training, whether it’s art or drama or music or whatever, the fact that they don’t get that adequately at elementary school means that when they get to Grade 9 Visual Arts they don’t know the basics and we have to spend time on the basics and not move on to more complicated stuff so everybody suffers. That and of course elementary schools, nothing against the elementary teachers, because I started as that, they are generalists, I mean when they took away the Grade 7 and 8 rotation it took away the ability for somebody who knows what they are doing in a particular subject, to teach their subject. They took away the art teachers, they took away the music teachers, they took away the math specialist so now you have people who are unfamiliar with or not comfortable with, teaching those subjects. These two examples refer to changes in policy that have had a negative impact on the delivery of elementary, and therefore, secondary curriculum. Both participants note their concern about the lack of arts specialists at the elementary level and the long term impact this has on curriculum delivery at the secondary level. A third participant alludes to this lack of specialists at the elementary level and the impact felt by students and teachers when they enter Grade 9 Art:
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Gifted Visual Arts Program Application

Gifted Visual Arts Program Application

All sixth through eighth grade students identified gifted in visual arts who wish to participate in the Gifted Visual Arts Program will attend Virginia Beach Middle School on a full time basis for academics and gifted art education. Third, fourth and fifth grade students identified as gifted in visual arts will have the option to participate in the Gifted Visual Arts Program through the one- day-a-week pull-out model housed at Kemps Landing/Old Donation School. Enrollment in Virginia Beach City Public Schols is required in order to participate in the Gifted Visual Arts Program.
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Visual Arts. Stage 6 Syllabus

Visual Arts. Stage 6 Syllabus

Students learn about practice in artmaking and learn how to make art in its various forms within the context of the artroom. Practice in artmaking requires an understanding of how a network of procedures can be used to make art and how the exercise of judgement as reflective action is central to the making of informed decisions. This judgement entails a knowledge of how right procedures are enacted and the different value positions that affect the visual arts, including how artworks are valued as creative products (including their own). Students learn about the importance of representation in the visual arts in their making of artworks and in viewing the work of others. They consider the nature of representations and how their own mental representations of ideas can be adapted and take on particular qualities in visual and aesthetic form in the artworks they make.
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Teaching and Learning of Visual Arts in Senior High Schools in Ghana

Teaching and Learning of Visual Arts in Senior High Schools in Ghana

As Short et al (1991) and Crocker (1991) indicate, teachers have control over seatwork, drills and practical exercise thereby maximizing achievement when teachers emphasise on academic instruction as their main goal. Wiggins and McTighe (2005) also attest that the more specific facts, concepts and skills are taught, the larger the ideas and processes gained. The study revealed that even though there were no studios for the various subjects, some of the Visual Arts teachers organise practical lessons under trees on the school compounds for their students during leisure times. Hayford’s (1998) observed that Ghana has examples of teachers who have redefined their teaching roles or responsibilities with the view of making a difference. On the other hand, it is to the disadvantage of the day students and the teachers who do not live on the school compound since they will have little or no practical lessons.
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Artist-Teachers' In-action Mental Models While Teaching Visual Arts

Artist-Teachers' In-action Mental Models While Teaching Visual Arts

The sample comprised of twenty artist-teachers, twelve men, eight women, five teach in Bezalel Academy; ten teach in Beit Berl College; two teach in teacher training institutions and three teach in "Alon" high school. Their ages ranged from 29 to 65 (average age: 43.9) and they all engaged actively in different fields of visual arts and displayed their work in exhibitions, galleries, and museums across Israel and the world. Participants had an education level ranging from high school graduates to Ph.D. holders (average education years – 17.40) and teaching experience ranging from two to thirty years (seniority average: 12.6). The presidents of the institutions gave their permission to faculty members to participate in the study, and consent was obtained from all the artists-teachers. Students attending the visual arts classes gave written consent to be videotaped and for their lessons to be analyzed.
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Visual Arts Program - 11 Tips for Making Your Own

Visual Arts Program - 11 Tips for Making Your Own

3. Seek letters or in-person support from parent, business leaders, colleagues, and students to help you explain your program’s value. If a community acts on behalf of programming, some courses and programs may be retained. Districts respond to community voices—without them, decision-makers may have no way of knowing whether or not a visual arts program is truly valuable to the community. Remember to publicly thank supporters and contributors, too. 4. Bear in mind that, in some instances, no matter how well-reasoned your

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Department of Visual Arts. Undergraduate Handbook. on the web on Facebook

Department of Visual Arts. Undergraduate Handbook. on the web on Facebook

Students who enter the BA-Visual Arts program with the intention of applying or re-applying to the BFA program may find that it offers more flexibility and meets their needs better than the BFA program. The BA-Visual Arts is a program that allows for substantial studio training while leaving more room for a range of other courses than is possible in the BFA program. Since the first 45-60 credit hours of the BFA and the BA-Visual Arts are essentially the same, students who want to be in a Visual Arts program but who are unsure of their goals or unable to do the entrance interview when they first apply are encouraged to register in the BA- Visual Arts program. There is no disadvantage to students who decide to wait to do the entrance interview at the end of their first 30-60 credit hours (at the end of their first or second year) of studies in the Department of Visual Arts.
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Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts

The Issues Report, which was based on their interviews with 100 visual arts professionals and a survey of CAA members, reported that the practices of many professionals in the visual arts are constrained due to the pervasive perception that permissions to use third-party materials are required even where a confident exercise of fair use would be appropriate. Most commonly the decision not to rely on fair use is made by visual arts professionals themselves. Although members of the community may rely on fair use in some instances, they may self-censor in others, due to confusion, doubt, and misinformation about fair use, leading them to over-rely on permissions. (This is in contrast to self-censorship due to specific, non-copyright-related circumstances, such as a personal relationship with an artist.) Doing so jeopardizes their ability to realize their own full potential, as well as that of the visual arts community as a whole.
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The role of the visual arts in enhancing the learning process

The role of the visual arts in enhancing the learning process

little convincing research that the study of the arts promotes aca- demic performance or elevates standardized test scores (Winner and Hetland, 2000). Really to understand whether art learning transfers to academic performance, we need first to assess what is actually learned in the arts and then to specify the mechanisms that underlie a transfer hypothesis. Hetland et al. (2007) therefore made a qualitative, ethnographic meta-analysis of the kinds of cognitive skills actually taught in the arts classroom, choosing the visual arts as their point of departure. The goal was to understand what is taught, in order to be able to develop a plausible theoretical transfer hypothesis. Eight “studio habits of mind” were identified as being taught in visual arts classes. Students are taught (1) to observe – to see with acuity; (2) to envision – to generate mental images and imagine; (3) to express – to find their personal voice; (4) to reflect – to think meta-cognitively about their decisions, make critical and evaluative judgments, and justify them; (5) to engage and persist – to work through frustration; (6) to stretch and explore – to take risks, “muck around,” and profit from mistakes; and of course (7) to develop craft; and (8) to understand the art world. This work is the first to demonstrate objectively the kinds of thinking skills and working styles taught in arts classes. The group is now investigating the possibility that the skill of envision- ing, taught in visual arts classes, may foster geometric reasoning ability.
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Table of Contents. Visual Arts

Table of Contents. Visual Arts

As considerably more time is allotted to the Visual Arts optional program, students are able to pursue the same learning as that of the compulsory program in greater depth in each year of the cycle. The program includes a wide variety of complex tasks involving transforming tangible matter and transforming imagery and image content, using traditional visual arts materials and technological tools, as well as artisans’ materials, if the context is appropriate, especially if there are cultural resources in the immediate environment that involve this type of artistic activity. When creating two-dimensional or three-dimensional images or still digital images, the students, working alone or in groups, must have access to a wide variety of resources to create a stock of ideas. Tasks that draw on observation, memory or invention enable them to refine their perception of people and things, thus enriching their images. When encouraged to carry their experiments further, students learn to personalize their investigation of gestures and materials. During the creative act, emphasis is placed on the control of transforming gestures, the quality of the use made of the properties of materials and the construction of meaning. In Secondary IV and V, the tasks involve a more conscious use of the symbolic function of images. They enable students to improve their ability to reflect and to effectively solve problems they encounter. They foster greater autonomy in the management of the materials used and the time allotted to the work. Finally, students must record relevant information about their creative experiences and manage their portfolios, which enables them to make use of reflective and metacognitive strategies.
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The visual arts influence in Nazi Germany

The visual arts influence in Nazi Germany

Nazi propaganda, it wasa successful brainwashing way when it tapped into existing political culture and beliefs.Also especially successful when aimed at the young, whose ideas and beliefs had either yet to be formed or were only partially formed.the key reason to support Hitler and the Nazi regime was Hitler himself. Aided greatly by propaganda genius Goebbels, Hitler was able to present an image of himself as a superhu- man, even god like figure. Nazi propaganda was very successful in portraying the Germans as supermen and making Hitler seem almost godlike. The Nazi party in order to expand supports of masses, they operated visual propaganda through dramatic political rallies and enormous Nazi symbols, uniforms, flags, posters, caricature and photos. Compared with text, the image was a more impressive way to help masses remember. However Hitler utilized visual arts as an approach to
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Criteria for Investing in the Market of Visual Arts

Criteria for Investing in the Market of Visual Arts

This reveals the variety of the visual arts market, so acquiring a piece with investment intentions becomes complex. When a specific piece is sold for the first time, the transaction is carried out in the primary market, and for subsequent sales the transaction takes place in the secondary one, a kind of second hand market, if the term applies. The latter is the one that encompasses most of the economic activity. Again, De la Poza Plaza, E. offers a clear view on the matter: Within the art market, the primary market corresponds to art galleries or any direct sale performed by the artist, while the secondary market is for auction rooms. Auction houses give the market liquidity, limiting the importance of the galleries. Likewise, they reduce the transaction costs of the pieces in the market by generating lower commissions than those of the art galleries. An important difference between the primary and secondary market is the lack of transparency of galleries, making the secondary market a reliable source of information. (P. 15) [5].
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Value Chain in the Visual Arts Market

Value Chain in the Visual Arts Market

Considering that price assignment of any product or service is not easy, it gets much more difficult when it comes to the visual arts. Here, other factors intervene such as geographical location (proximity or remoteness from the centers of interest) or the death of the artist. For example, let us consider how much the artist J. M. Basquiat (1987) could have spent on materials for his painting "The Boxer." If he invested one thousand dollars at the time, why was the painting sold for $70 million in 1993? On the other hand, why did the aesthetic ideas and innovation of the artist's work give it such significance and quality that the art world was so delighted that its value, not price, was equivalent to 70 million dollars?
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Visual Arts as a Tool for Phenomenology

Visual Arts as a Tool for Phenomenology

interviews with each of the participants, I went on a journey—a journey to see the lives of others. Through using visual arts methods—having participants draw pictures as a part of each interview—I was able to literally and figuratively see the experiences described. I found that through the process of creating the drawings (e.g., pauses to draw, physical materials to develop, thought process to create) and also in discussing the created images, the participants and I were able to reach a deeper level of communication and understanding. The use of visual arts supported the participants to communicate their ideas in ways that may have not emerged without many additional interviews, if at all. Thus, drawings as a visual arts method used within a transcendental phenomenological study provide a way to enable, encourage and support participant voice, in particular when
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