Work-Family Conflict

Top PDF Work-Family Conflict:

The relationship of work-family conflict with overall health, workplace cognitive failure, and marital satisfaction: The moderating role of sleep quality and work-family conflict self-efficacy

The relationship of work-family conflict with overall health, workplace cognitive failure, and marital satisfaction: The moderating role of sleep quality and work-family conflict self-efficacy

Method: Participants include 234 employees of the Aghajari Oil and Gas Production Company (AOGPC) who were selected by a stratified random sampling method. These participants completed the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Work- Family Conflict Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, Short form of Health Survey Questionnaire, Workplace Cognitive Failure Questionnaire, and the Marital Satisfaction Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

12 Read more

WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT: A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES IN DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH

WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT: A STUDY ON EMPLOYEES IN DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH

A survey conducted over 10 years ago by the Conference Board of Canada (Paris, 1989), showed that 58% of employers believed that work-family conflict created stress for their employees. By the end of the 90s awareness among employers was even higher – close to 75% of employers indicated that employee stress was in part attributable to the challenges faced in blending work, family and personal responsibilities (Bachman, 2000).Research that has looked at work-life issues from the viewpoint of employers has tended to take two approaches. The first approach starts with the assumption that ignoring work-life conflict is expensive to the organization and documents the costs to the workplace, when, it does not provide a supportive work environment, Johnson, Lero & Rooney (2001) note that, to date, recognition of the costs of ignoring work-life conflict has not been sufficient to generate strong employer action.
Show more

11 Read more

Emotional Labor: The Role of Emotional Intelligence and Work-Family Conflict (WFC)

Emotional Labor: The Role of Emotional Intelligence and Work-Family Conflict (WFC)

Employees of service industry in Malaysia score higher than average on the ability to manage others emotion (MOsE) can be attributed to the Malaysian culture. According to Minkov (2018), Malaysian culture inclines towards a more feminine and long-term oriented dimension. Feminine cultures linked to good relationship and cooperation at work, which requires a thorough observation of their counterparts to better understand the emotions [32]. Malaysian culture also tends to adapt well to the situation even it clashed with one’s value and disposition [33]. The above-mentioned characteristics are crucial in building a harmony relationship on a workplace that may influence the significant negative association between the ability to manage other’s emotions and work-family conflict.
Show more

6 Read more

Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire

Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire

The inter-correlation of factor-based work- family construct ranged from 0.35 to 0.78 (Figure 1). High inter correlation among the four dimensions of work-family conflict construct calls for examining the discriminant validity (17). This is to ensure that each latent variable in the model (WIFt, WIFs, FIWt and FIWs) is different and can be discriminated from other three construct. In order to prove the discriminant validity, the Average Variance Extracted (AVE) for each latent variable should be larger than the shared variance estimate (square of the correlation) (18). The formula given by Fornell and Larcker (18) used to calculate AVE which can be seen in table 3. The finding of current study showed that AVE of all latent variables is larger than shared variance between any two variables. Therefore, there is
Show more

8 Read more

Work-family conflict and turnover intentions amongst indigenous employees: The importance of the whanau/family for Maori

Work-family conflict and turnover intentions amongst indigenous employees: The importance of the whanau/family for Maori

Data was collected from 13 New Zealand organizations in a wide geographical location. This location was selected due to the high population of Maori employees. Surveys were hand delivered by one of the researchers and collected from a secure drop box by the same researcher. CEOs or Senior Managers sent all employees a notice or email about the research encouraging Maori employees to participate. Data collection was done in two waves with a two month gap between surveys to eliminate any issues relating to common method variance. Surveys were matched by a unique employee code. Survey One contained the measures for work-family conflict, whanau support, and demographic variables. Survey Two had the dependent variable (turnover intentions). From a total of 350 Maori employees, a total of 238 participants responded to the first survey for an initial 68% response rate. The follow up survey produced a total of 197 responses, resulting in an overall response rate of 56.3% for surveys one and two.
Show more

32 Read more

Spillover and work family conflict in probation practice: Managing the boundary between work and home life

Spillover and work family conflict in probation practice: Managing the boundary between work and home life

practitioners. Rather, we would argue, probation providers should provide a range of forms of supervision in addition to the managerial approach that out participants described. Examples might include greater use of clinical supervision or a reinstatement of the some elements of the Offender Engagement Programme, in particular the reflective supervision model (Copsey. 2011). Studies of spillover and work-family conflict in social work practice can provide further assistance. Some provide reflective tools which practitioners can use to help manage the boundary between work and home life with a focus on self-care (Kinman et al, 2014) could be tested and adapted for use in probation. This, we would argue, needs to be a collaborative effort between academics, policy makers and practitioners. To conclude, this article has shown the ways in which spillover occurs and affects probation practitioners. This would allow for the provision of better support so that practitioners can manage the boundary more effectively thus leading to more effective service provision and enhanced staff
Show more

20 Read more

Psychosocial work environment, organisational justice and work family conflict as predictors of Malaysian worker wellbeing

Psychosocial work environment, organisational justice and work family conflict as predictors of Malaysian worker wellbeing

In Western settings, previous research indicates that workplace interventions aimed at enhancing employee wellbeing are conducted at the managerial level and thus neglect subordinate workers (Worrall & Cooper, 1998). Subordinate and junior employees, especially those from low social economic status exhibit poorer health (Chandola & Jenkinson, 2000) and low levels of wellbeing (Newell, 2000). Similarly, previous studies of employee wellbeing in Malaysia have only been carried out among professionals (Ahmad, 1996), academics and white collar secretarial-clerical workers (Noor, 1999; 2002) and have mainly focused on women and work family conflict relationships. Thus, the present study addresses the need for research among subordinate and junior workers corporations and blue collar workers as emphasised by Sparks et al. (2001). In addition, a more recent study by Srimathi and Kiran Kumar (2010), involving Indian employees, found that wellbeing differed between occupations and organisations: teachers reported the highest level of wellbeing; bank employees with a medium level; and the industrial employees reported the lowest. Therefore, it is imperative to direct research effort at industrial workers, specifically in the manufacturing sector – including assembly line workers, floor supervisors and factory managers. The current research intends to address the gap in knowledge regarding worker wellbeing in the manufacturing sector. It is hoped that the findings from the current research project will provide a better understanding of employee wellbeing in the manufacturing sector and will be able to be used to enhance their wellbeing.
Show more

368 Read more

Work family conflict: does type of social support matter?

Work family conflict: does type of social support matter?

perceived work-family conflict (WFC): work interference into the family (WIF) and family interference into work (FIW).The data were collected online during the period of two (October 2013 – November 2013)by means of a questionnaire filled by 100 participants: female (n=64) and male (n=36), working full-time, married/cohabitating, with one or more children. The survey included The WorkFamily Conflict Scale and 12 items instrument designed to measure four types of social support. The results suggested that emotional social support obtained from a pervisor alleviates strain-based WIF/FIW for women. Instrumental coworkers’ support appeared to mitigate behavior-based FIW/WIF for men. Likewise, supervisory instrumental support proved to be a significant factor protecting against strain-based WIF for men. On the contrary, supervisory support increased strain-based FIW for men. The uniqueness of this study lies in its examination of all four distinct types of social support from work-based sources in WFC context. Thanks to its scope, the study broadens the understanding of social support and WFC interface.
Show more

8 Read more

The effect of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment on effective organizational commitment among faculty clerical staff in UTM Skudai

The effect of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment on effective organizational commitment among faculty clerical staff in UTM Skudai

For example, co-workers can assist in emotional support by mitigating the stress associated with work-family conflict. Instrumental support includes offering assistance by emailing or delivering work materials when an employee has to work from home to attend to a sick child. Support from supervisor may also be in the form emotional and instrumental support, where they may be emotionally empathetic and sensitive towards work-family conflict issue and concern for the well-being of employees and their families. Instrumental support may include offering advice in meeting family responsibilities, providing direct assistant to accomplish work task, making scheduling changes, and also giving encouragement to employee to use family-friendly policy that has been established by the organization. According to Edwards and Rothbard (2000), support from supervisor helps to reduce work-related concerns, which may help employees to participate in family activities effectively. Management support is related to the policy and benefits that stress out the importance of work-family balance and give opportunities for employees to use the policy that will help to balance between work and family lives. Besides, management can also give support by encouraging family-supportive work culture. Colton (2004) suggested that management support leads to positive spill-over between work and family.
Show more

65 Read more

Mothers’ work–family conflict and enrichment:associations with parenting quality and couple relationship

Mothers’ work–family conflict and enrichment:associations with parenting quality and couple relationship

This effect was net of the effect that workfamily enrichment might impart via women’s mental health. Our findings suggest a main effect between workfamily enrichment, and more warm and consistent parenting. It may be that mothers revalue the time that they do spend with their children when time is constrained by employment participation, and prioritize affection and consistency for their children. For some families, increased income might mean that some mundane, routine domestic tasks can be outsourced, alleviating stress. Alterna- tively, a satisfying, high-quality job conveys competence, opti- mism, motivation and self-esteem. These are all supportive qualities for promoting parenting confidence and competence. Higher workfamily conflict was associated with reporting a poorer quality couple relationship, and frequent couple conflict. Previous research has demonstrated that low job quality, workfamily conflict and stress are associated with relationship prob- lems such as withdrawal, conflict and inequitable sharing of domestic work (Allen et al. 2000). Our findings provide further evidence that negative experiences in the workplace adversely affect the quality of emotional exchanges within the intimate partner relationship. Notably, we report an independent
Show more

12 Read more

Managing Life and Work Demands: The Impact of Organizational Support on Work-family Conflict in Public and Private Sectors

Managing Life and Work Demands: The Impact of Organizational Support on Work-family Conflict in Public and Private Sectors

To test the mediating effect of work-family conflict and job satisfaction I decomposed the effects associated with each path to job satisfaction and turnover by applying the path multiplication rule (Garson, 2006). This rule utilizes the path coefficients to decompose correlations in the model into direct and indirect effects, corresponding, of course, to direct and indirect paths reflected in the arrows in the model. However, although SEM provides some insight into mediation, by allowing one to decompose the total effects in a model, the AMOS software does not provide enough detail for a complete assessment of mediation. I complemented the SEM analysis with Baron and Kenny’s (1986) four step approach, in which several regression analyses are conducted and significance of the coefficients is examined at each step. The first condition states that the exogenous variable must affect the possible mediating variable. The second condition asserts that the mediator variable must affect the endogenous variable. The third condition states that, if the first two conditions are met and one then controls for the mediating variable, the effect between the exogenous and endogenous variables must be dramatically reduced with ideal mediation. The purpose of these three conditions is to establish that zero-order relationships among the variables exist. If one or more of these relationships are nonsignificant, researchers usually conclude that mediation is not possible or likely. Assuming there are significant
Show more

213 Read more

Work-family conflict and work engagement among mothers: Conscientiousness and neuroticism as moderators

Work-family conflict and work engagement among mothers: Conscientiousness and neuroticism as moderators

Personality has been found to have an impact on the extent to which an individual is engaged in his or her work (Langelaan et al., 2006). A study conducted by Jeong et al. (2009) on the effects of personality and work engagement found a link between high conscientiousness coupled with low neuroticism (emotional stability) and work engagement. Another study revealed that work engagement is predicted by conscientiousness, emotional stability, and low stress due to demands (Mostert & Rothmann, 2006). A positive relationship between neuroticism and burnout (often considered the opposite of work engagement) has been found in previous studies (Langelaan et al., 2006; Morgan & De Bruin, 2010). Furthermore, several studies have found that personal resources (e.g., proactive personality, and mental and emotional competencies) also act as significant predictors of work engagement (Bakker et al., 2008; Prieto et al., 2008; Robertson & Cooper, 2010; Schaufeli, Bakker & Salanova, 2006). In addition to work engagement, personality has been linked work-family conflict. The current study focused on two of the Big Five personality traits, namely conscientiousness and neuroticism, given that literature shows that conscientiousness and neuroticism are commonly associated with work-family conflict (Andreassi, 2011; Bruck & Allen, 2003; Wayne et al., 2004).
Show more

12 Read more

A Quantitative Study of the Variables that Influence Work-Family Conflict of Female Counselors

A Quantitative Study of the Variables that Influence Work-Family Conflict of Female Counselors

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between female counselors’ work-family conflict and their demographic (i.e., ethnicity, age, educational level, and annual household income), occupational (i.e., ethnicity, age, educational level, and annual household income), and family (i.e., marital/partner status; number of children at home under the age of 18; age of youngest child; care of elderly, ill, or disabled family members; source of support; and support) characteristics. Super’s (1990) Life-Space Life-Span theory provided a framework to understand female counselors’ engagement in multiple roles in work and family and the conflict that can result in two directions: work interfering with family (WIF), and family interfering with work (FIW) (Frone, Russell, & Cooper, 1992). Female counselors were contacted through electronic email communication in which they received a link to access the online survey that totaled 51 questions. Female counselors from the state of Louisiana and Alabama participated in the survey for a sample size of 266.
Show more

153 Read more

Analysis of Work Family Conflict in View of Nurses, in Health Sector of Pakistan

Analysis of Work Family Conflict in View of Nurses, in Health Sector of Pakistan

The work family conflict literature reflects that it affects the cognitive- affective of employees, psychological well-being and behavioural, aspect of their lives (Allen et al., 2000; Greenhaus, Collins, and Shaw, 2003). Moreover work family conflict is significantly related with Burnout, and turnover (Burke, 1988; Frone et al., 1992), low levels of job satisfaction (Kossek and Ozeki 1998; Allen et al., 2000), lack of organizational commitment (Lyness and Thompson 1997), absenteeism (Gignac, Kelloway and Gottlieb 1996), depression, marital satisfaction and life satisfaction, career satisfaction, job satisfaction, family satisfaction (Higgins and Duxbury, 1992), and spillover moods (Williams & Alliger, 1994). Whereas the Source of conflict depend on the accessibility of various support system within and outside the family as well as the organization where she work.
Show more

14 Read more

Abusive Supervision and Work Family Conflict: The Mediating Role of Emotional Exhaustion

Abusive Supervision and Work Family Conflict: The Mediating Role of Emotional Exhaustion

Our study extends prior research and contributes to the abusive supervision literature in the following ways. First, our research explores the effects of abusive supervision outside the organizations and has found out the direct relationship between abusive supervision and work-family conflict. Previous research has concentrated on the outcomes in work domain, such as organizational citizenship behavior (Rafferty & Restubog, 2011), job performance (Tepper, Moss, & Duffy, 2011), increased workplace deviance (Mitchell & Ambrose, 2007) and intention to leave. Prior research have proved that abused employees cannot express their depression to their supervisors within the organization due to the norms and regulations, however, they would express their true feeling and revenge to his family, which is called kick the dog (Hoobler & Brass, 2006). Our research investi- gated the influence in work-family conflict. Based on conservations of resources theory, abused subordinates suffered from the loss of leadership support and need invest more resources into work domain and leave no time and energy for their family. As a result, abusive supervision has a positive relationship with work-family con- flict.
Show more

8 Read more

Work–family conflict based on strain: The most hazardous type of conflict in Iranian hospitals nurses

Work–family conflict based on strain: The most hazardous type of conflict in Iranian hospitals nurses

License. Introduction Over the past two decades, many hospitals have faced an increasing demand for health care because of the aging population (Lembrechts, Dekocker, Zanoni & Pulignano, 2015). The shortage of experienced nurses in both Western and Eastern countries also intensifies the working conditions for hospital nurses (McDermid, Peters & Jackson, 2012). This situation gives rise to an imbalance between the work and family aspects of their lives, which is labelled as workfamily conflict (WFC) (e.g. Pal & Saksvik, 2008). One of the ways for nurses to reduce the heavy work demands is for nurses to leave the nursing profession (e.g. Bruck, Allen & Spector, 2002). Another way is by understanding the impacts of different types of WFC and familywork conflict (FWC) on the health situation of hospital nurses (Russell, O’Connell & McGinnity, 2009). This allows us to identify the most hazardous type of conflict as well as to plan more personalized methods and solutions for overcoming this conflict type.
Show more

10 Read more

Social support at work and at home: Dual-buffering effects in the work-family conflict process

Social support at work and at home: Dual-buffering effects in the work-family conflict process

Many organizations design workplace interventions to reduce work-family conflict (Kossek, Baltes, & Matthews, 2011), and supervisors are often considered critical ingredients to the effective implementation of work-family initiatives (Kossek, Pichler, et al., 2011). Prior research posited that supervisor work-family support (i.e., social support that specifically assists in managing work-family issues) plays a central role in alleviating work-family conflict experiences among employees (Goh, Ilies, & Wilson, 2015) and can be improved by offering training to supervisors aimed at increasing their use of family-supportive supervisor behaviors (Hammer, Kossek, Anger, Bodner, & Zimmerman, 2011). While it is critical that supervisors (and other workplace sources of support) offer content-relevant resources to manage work- family conflicts, the implication of our findings is that supervisors should also focus on support that facilitates personal effectiveness and productivity at work, which would enable employees to effectively deal with high workloads and thus experience less strain and work-family
Show more

52 Read more

Effect of work-family conflict management model in life satisfaction of male employees

Effect of work-family conflict management model in life satisfaction of male employees

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of workfamily conflict management model in life satisfaction among employees of the bank in Tehran. The research findings showed that work–life conflict management has a positive impact on employees’ life satisfaction. This finding is consistent with the results of researches by Yasbek [14]; Mauno & nnunen [20]; Perrone & Civiletto [24]; Auko [25]; Kossek & Ozeki [26]; Sakthivel, Kamal & Selvarania [30]; Maren, Pitarelli & Cangiano [31]; Malekiha [32]; Sheikhshabani & Arshadi [33]; Saadi & Bavi [35]. The results of this study could be explained by the fact that work-life conflict management practices are skills that are designed to reduce work-life conflict and enable employees to be more effective in their roles of work and life. Changing demographics are behind the move to embrace work–life programs. The decline of traditional family relations, increase of dual-career couples, and a rise in the number of single parents mean that employees are juggling more responsibilities outside work [29].
Show more

7 Read more

The Impact of Work-Family Conflict on Working Mothers’ Career Development: A Review of Literature

The Impact of Work-Family Conflict on Working Mothers’ Career Development: A Review of Literature

Time is a major concern because time at the workplace is viewed by employers as a substitute for employee’s effectiveness (Bailyn, L., 1980). (Raabe, B. and T.A. Beehr, 2003), identified that most settings of organizations have made it customary with assumptions establishing a link between time at work and quantity and quality of productivity. Organizations have developed the strategy of rewarding long hours and organizational commitment thus making it difficult for working mothers to balance the conflicts arising from work and family spheres (Lockwood, R., 2003). Furthermore, top managerial attitudes toward the advancement of employees working less than standard full-time hours or those employees who do not devote the maximum amount of time possible to the organization are seen as less productive and less committed, and therefore less valuable (Lewis, S., 1997). As a result, individuals available to work long hours and be present in the workplace are better able to compete successfully for career development opportunities (Burke, 2002). However, being a mother doesn’t necessarily provide the luxury of such time to be equally and actively involved with work roles due to family roles. (Tausig, M. and R. Fenwick, 2001), have identified time, specifically the working hours to be the most consistent work factor and attribute predicting work-family conflict.
Show more

7 Read more

How do work-family balance practices affect work-family conflict? The differential roles of work stress

How do work-family balance practices affect work-family conflict? The differential roles of work stress

A closer examination of the empirical literature reveals that work-family balance practices may not always alleviate employee work-family conflict (Kelly et al. 2008). For example, while some studies found significant negative relationships between work-family balance practices and work-family conflict (O ’ Driscoll et al., 2003; Thompson et al. 1999), others found significant positive relationships (Brough et al. 2005; Hammer et al., 2005) or non-significant relationships (Kossek et al. 2006; Lapierre and Allen, 2006). These inconsistencies in previous research findings sug- gest that the existing conceptualizations of how work-family balance practices in- fluence work-family conflict may be deficient. Some researchers have found that one explanation of this inconsistency might originate from the “agency and capabil- ities gap” (Hobson, 2014). They have also discovered that the extent of this gap was somehow dependent upon certain national policy frameworks, organizational/ managerial support and the individual ’ s preferences.
Show more

22 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...