Top PDF Educational disadvantage : how does England compare?

Educational disadvantage : how does England compare?

Educational disadvantage : how does England compare?

A separate, but linked issue is whether and how students are streamed or grouped by ability within individual schools. Such practices are often adopted by schools as a way of addressing within school variation - shown on the left hand side of Figure 2.1 - on the basis that such setting allows for differentiated forms of teaching and curricula for different ability levels. Such practices are near universal in England, with 99 per cent of PISA participants set in some subjects, but much less so in some other school systems – for example, in Finland, 58 per cent of PISA participants were grouped by ability in 2015. There is good evidence that while such practices can benefit higher attaining students, they tend to impact negatively on middle and lower attaining students. 49 This can impact negatively on social justice because of the tendency for certain types of students to be placed in bottom sets: for example, one recent large scale study in England identified that privileged students (White, middle class) were most likely to be in top sets whereas working-class and Black students were more likely to be in bottom sets. 50 There is also evidence that students in lower sets are often less well taught and develop negative self-concepts around their own learning and abilities, although the EEF highlights studies which indicate ways to address such outcomes, such as reducing the size
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Social segregation in secondary schools: how does England compare with other countries?

Social segregation in secondary schools: how does England compare with other countries?

We provide new evidence about the degree of social segregation in England’s secondary schools, employing a cross-national perspective. Analysis is based on data for 27 rich industrialised countries from the 2000 and 2003 rounds of the Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA), using a number of different measures of social background and of segregation, and allowing for sampling variation in the estimates. England is shown to be a middle-ranking country, as is the USA. High segregation countries include Austria, Belgium, Germany and Hungary. Low segregation countries include the four Nordic countries and Scotland. In explaining England’s position, we argue that its segregation is mostly accounted for by unevenness in social background in the state school sector. Focusing on this sector, we show that cross-country differences in segregation are associated with the prevalence of selective choice of pupils by schools. Low-segregation countries such as those in the Nordic area and Scotland have negligible selection in schools. High segregation countries like Austria, Germany and Hungary have separate school tracks for academic and vocational schooling and, in each case, over half of this is accounted for by unevenness in social background between the different tracks rather than by differences within each track.
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Social Segregation in Secondary Schools: How Does England Compare with Other Countries?

Social Segregation in Secondary Schools: How Does England Compare with Other Countries?

England’s private schools are, in general, more exclusive than those in other countries. Table 3 contrasts, for a selection of countries, the percentage of 15 year olds with a high social background in private schools, defined on the management basis, with the corresponding percentage in state schools. Two definitions of ‘high’ are used: above the national median and above the national upper quartile. One half of all pupils at private schools in England are in the top quarter of the distribution of social position: the difference of nearly 30 percentage points from the figure for pupils in state schools much larger than the OECD average. In Scotland, the difference is slightly bigger again. Changing the high/low cut-off to the median produces even larger differences between children in private and state schools. (The situation in England and Scotland relative to other countries in part reflects the fact that privately managed English and Scots schools are invariably privately funded as well, whereas this is not the case with many privately managed schools in a number of other countries.)
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Social segregation in secondary schools: how does England compare with other countries?

Social segregation in secondary schools: how does England compare with other countries?

England’s private schools are, in general, more exclusive than those in other countries. Table 3 contrasts, for a selection of countries, the percentage of 15 year olds with a high social background in private schools, defined on the management basis, with the corresponding percentage in state schools. Two definitions of ‘high’ are used: above the national median and above the national upper quartile. One half of all pupils at private schools in England are in the top quarter of the distribution of social position: the difference of nearly 30 percentage points from the figure for pupils in state schools much larger than the OECD average. In Scotland, the difference is slightly bigger again. Changing the high/low cut-off to the median produces even larger differences between children in private and state schools. (The situation in England and Scotland relative to other countries in part reflects the fact that privately managed English and Scots schools are invariably privately funded as well, whereas this is not the case with many privately managed schools in a number of other countries.)
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PISA 2009 : how does the social attainment gap in England compare with countries internationally?

PISA 2009 : how does the social attainment gap in England compare with countries internationally?

S hangh ai-C hi na Hong Kong-China Singapore Korea Finland Japan New Zealand Poland Canada Chinese Taipei France Hungary Australia Netherlands Portugal Belgium Turkey Switzerland Liechtenstein Estonia Ireland Mac a o-China OECD averag e United States Germany Spain Italy Latvia England Norway Denmark Sweden Greece Iceland Czech Republic Slovak Republic Croatia Slovenia Israel Lithuania Austria Chile Russian Federation Luxembourg Mexico Uruguay Thailand Colombia Brazil Trinidad and Serbia Dubai (UAE) Romania Bulgaria Indonesia Tunisia Argentina Peru Jordan Montenegro Albania Kazakhstan Panama Azerbaijan Qatar Kyrgyzstan Comparison country Me an rea d in g sco re ( P ISA p o int s)
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HOW DOES TEACHER PAY COMPARE?

HOW DOES TEACHER PAY COMPARE?

Appendices • 41 CONCLUSION Our empirical foray into estimating teacher relative wages provides some ad- vances over the prior literature. For some reason, analysts have failed to use the CPS-ORG data on weekly wages to estimate teacher relative wages, even though this is one of the most heavily used data sets for analyzing wages. Using the ORG, however, requires overcoming the challenge of the bias imparted by the imputa- tion process and a discontinuity in the series due to the CPS redesign. Despite these challenges, we think these are valuable, if not the most valuable, data for these purposes. We also innovated by using the NCS occupational leveling factor criteria, or measurement of skills, to systematically identify occupations that are comparable to teachers. This grouping of 16, or the eight largest occupations, holds promise for use in other empirical settings. Our examination of the fringe benefit bias helps to clarify the discussion of teacher pay by quantifying the effect of teachers having a somewhat better benefit package (assuming a CPS-type W-2 wage measure) on the assessment of teacher relative wages or pay. All in all, incorporating benefits into the analysis does not alter the general picture of teach- ers having a substantial wage/pay disadvantage that eroded considerably over the last 10 years. Last, our examination of the underlying methodology of the NCS yielded an important insight into the uses and limitations of the NCS data. One limitation is that it is not appropriate to compare weekly or hourly wages of occupations that are part-year or have irregular work hours to other occupations that conform to a more usual 52-week, 40-hours-per-week schedule.
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How Does Your Doctor Compare?

How Does Your Doctor Compare?

“If patients have a poor experience with their doctor, they’re not going to come back for their tests, they may not take their medications, and they may not learn how to manage these things themselves,” says Michael Cantor, M.D., quality medical director for the New England Quality Care Alliance. (To see how practices scored in those clinical measures, go to MHQP.org and click on “Clinical Quality in Primary Care.”) Use the Ratings on the following pages to see how your doctor’s practice fared in the survey. On page 4 we give some high- lights from the survey, and use questions from it to help you assess your relation-
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The mathematics skills of school children: How does England compare to the high performing East Asian jurisdictions?

The mathematics skills of school children: How does England compare to the high performing East Asian jurisdictions?

Finally, although we maintain that policymakers should focus on the earlier stages of young people’s educational career, some important changes are needed to improve aspects of mathematics provision during secondary school. The most pressing issue is to ensure that the curriculum stretches the best young mathematicians enough, and that they are motivated (and incentivised) to fully develop their already accumulated academic skill. Evidence presented in this paper has suggested that the gap between the highest achieving children in England and the highest achieving children in East Asia widens between ages 10 and 16 (at least in mathematics). This is something that needs to be corrected as highly skilled individuals are likely to be important for the continuing success of certain major British industries (e.g. financial services) and to foster the technological innovation needed for long-run economic growth (Bean and Brown 2005, Toner 2011). One possible explanation for this finding is the widespread use of private tuition by East Asian families for both remedial and enrichment purposes (Ono, 2007; Sohn et al., 2010). This helps to boost the performance of all pupils, including those already performing well at school. In comparison, private tutoring in England is mainly undertaken by a relatively small selection of children from affluent backgrounds, often for remedial purposes. While a large proportion of East Asian families are willing to personally finance such activities through the private sector, the same is unlikely to hold true in the foreseeable future within England. Consequently, the state may need to intervene. Gifted and talented schemes, a shift of school and pupil incentives away from reaching floor targets (e.g. a C grade in GCSE mathematics) and enhanced tuition for children who excel in school are all possible policy responses.
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The mathematics skills of school children: How does England compare to the high performing East Asian jurisdictions?

The mathematics skills of school children: How does England compare to the high performing East Asian jurisdictions?

inequality. In particular, whereas mathematics achievement seems to become more equal in England during secondary school, in the East Asian countries it becomes more dispersed 14 . What is behind this apparent change in educational inequality? Table 4 panel A presents the 10 th percentile of the achievement distribution at the three ages. This reflects the math skills of the lowest achieving pupils within each of the 13 nations. Figure 3 illustrates how the 10 th percentile changes between primary and secondary school for England and East Asian nations. The left hand side refers to the age 10-14 comparison and the right hand side the age 10-16 comparison. The thin black line running through the centre of the bars represents the estimated 90% confidence interval. Interestingly, there is some evidence of an increase in P10 within England, particularly for the age 10 to age 16 comparison. In other words, the low achievers in England manage to improve relative to low achievers in other countries. The opposite is true, however, in Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, where P10 declines (e.g. in Hong Kong P10 declines from -0.48 at age 10 to -0.72 at age 16).
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How does the health and wellbeing of children and young people in London compare with four major cities in
England?

How does the health and wellbeing of children and young people in London compare with four major cities in England?

(24.5%) of all people in London aged under 20 years. Measuring and reporting their circumstances is key to improving their wellbeing. 2 The health and wellbeing of children and young people in London has improved in many ways over the past two decades. However there are areas that have improved little for London’s children, such as child poverty and health inequalities. Comparisons have been uniformly made between London and the England average, which may not always be the most suitable comparison for the capital. 3 Population demographics in London are markedly different to that of many parts of England and large urban areas are likely to have a range of health disadvantages (e.g. crowding, pollution) and potential health advantages (eg better access to health services) than rural areas. It is therefore useful to compare London with other major urban centres in England, which are likely to share issues related to urbanicity, demographics and health care. Such a comparison would show where other cities are doing better than London in order to identify opportunities for improving the health of children and young people in London.
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How Does the City s Economy Compare to Other College Towns? MORGANTOWN WEST VIRGINIA. How Does the City s Economy Compare to Other College Towns?

How Does the City s Economy Compare to Other College Towns? MORGANTOWN WEST VIRGINIA. How Does the City s Economy Compare to Other College Towns?

demographics; business and living costs; and public and private infrastructure. Variables related to macroeconomic outcomes consider how broad measures of the city’s economy have performed in recent years. Our analysis of each city’s demographic characteristics considers fundamental population attributes such as age distribution, educational attainment, health outcomes, and the like. This section is important, in part because businesses that may consider locating in the area are likely to judge these factors when determining whether the local workforce will meet their specific needs. In a similar vein, variables relating to business and living costs are important from a business perspective
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Digital experiences of higher education students in Ghana: how does it compare

Digital experiences of higher education students in Ghana: how does it compare

As digital technologies and capabilities continues to alter lives at an exponential rate and becomes more and more ingrained in people’s day to day lives, it will continue to be a key asset that HEIs must make the most of to help with educational goals such as improving learning (Becker, Pasquini, & Zentner, 2017). It is also the responsibility of HEIs to prepare students for the changing job market as we enter the fourth industrial revolution. Enabling student contact with new and emerging technologies as part of learning will help equip them to adapt to the next wave of digital innovation (Fadel, Bialik & Trilling, 2015). The study therefore compares what the students’ digital experiences are in the Ghanaian context with the UK and Australia. We believe that this will provide insight to HEIs in Ghana to re-evaluate themselves and improve digital provision and experiences of students in learning that will allow the Ghanaian student to flourish in the global economy. In other words, the study will enable HEIs in Ghana to identify where they currently are, where they are doing well and where there is scope for improvement.
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How does SA compare? Experiences of crime and policing in an African context

How does SA compare? Experiences of crime and policing in an African context

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How does tele-learning compare with other forms of education delivery? A systematic review of tele-learning educational outcomes for health professionals

How does tele-learning compare with other forms of education delivery? A systematic review of tele-learning educational outcomes for health professionals

The literature indicates that tele-learning can provide an effective means of delivering educational outcomes for health professionals. The majority of the available literature on tele-learning is descriptive or observational. This review focused on ran- domised controlled trials and comparative studies. Caution must be taken when interpreting the results of these studies as they often lacked an established evaluation framework, and failed to control for independent variables such as participants’ prior knowledge and ability, instructor expe- rience and methods, and instructor and participant famil- iarity with technology. Limitations also included small sample sizes and non-random selection of participants.
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HOW DOES PEER PRESSURE AFFECT EDUCATIONAL INVESTMENTS?*

HOW DOES PEER PRESSURE AFFECT EDUCATIONAL INVESTMENTS?*

In practice, this strategy involves restricting our analysis to students taking between one and three honors classes. 16 We note that in implementing this strategy, we must condition on the number of honors classes being taken so that we only compare stu- dents taking the same number. To see this, note that the full set of some-honors students we find in nonhonors classes will include a greater share of students taking just one honors class relative to students taking three honors classes (setting aside differences in the size of these two groups), since the former are much more likely to be in a nonhonors class during any given period. By contrast, the set of some-honors students we find in honors classes will contain a larger share of three-honors students relative to one-honors stu- dents. Since one- and three-honors students likely differ from each other in many ways, our empirical strategy relies on compar- ing only among those taking the same number of honors classes, who should therefore be similar, just exploiting variation in whether we happened to arrive when they were sitting in one of their honors classes or one of their nonhonors classes.
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How does SCIP compare

How does SCIP compare

 STARR/PC2 is installed at the User site, whereas SCIP resides within a USG data center.  Information needs, expense, and particularly telecommunication[r]

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How does Australia compare internationally?

How does Australia compare internationally?

The second significant event was the appointment of a new chairman to NOHSC, Mr Jerry Ellis. Mr Ellis brings to NOHSC a strong interest in international benchmarking and the need to align our National OHS Strategy with the best performing countries. The aim of this report is to compare the rate of work-related fatal injury in Australia to the corresponding rates in other industrialised countries, taking into account, as much as possible, the main differences in the available data. International Labour Office (ILO) data are used because the best compendium source of information on work place fatalities is the ILO yearbook or website (www.laborsta.ilo.org). The ILO compiles statistics of occupational injuries on the basis of information supplied by relevant national organisations. To enhance their usefulness they also compile basic
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How does your doctor compare?

How does your doctor compare?

We are able to do this project not only because of the data provided by CHPI and its participating provider groups but also because of collaboration with the California HealthCare Foundation. That nonprofit organi- zation has agreed to present the Ratings on its website, at calqualitycare.org. In addition, CHCF is helping CHPI and Consumer Reports pilot a project that allows consumers to rate their own doctors through a short online survey, available at ConsumerReports.org/cro/caldocs. Your survey responses will be part of a re- search project to study how best to get consumer input into doctor performance. Your identity, of course, will not be disclosed.
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How Does Your Doctor Compare?

How Does Your Doctor Compare?

How Should i use the Ratings? use them to see how your doctor’s group fared, or to look for groups in your area that have scored particularly well. look first at a practice’s overall score, then at its scores for individual measures, such as communicating with patients, coordinating care, and getting timely appointments. Keep in mind that no single measure reveals everything about the quality of care at a doctor’s office, so it pays to gather information from multiple sources.

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HOW DOES YOUR STATE COMPARE?

HOW DOES YOUR STATE COMPARE?

(c) Includes sales taxes specific to alcoholic beverages. (d) Includes the wholesale tax rate of 11%, converted into a gallonage excise tax rate. Note: Rates are those applicable to off-premise sales of 11% alcohol by volume (a.b.v.) non-carbonated wine in 750ml containers. States may apply different rates to other wines, such as sparkling wines. Federal rates vary by alcohol content and type of wine, ranging up to $3.15 per gallon for 21-24 percent alcohol and $3.40 for sparkling wine. D.C.’s rank does not affect other states’ rankings, but the figure in parentheses indicates where it would rank if included.
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