Top PDF The effect of sleep quality and sleep quantity on concussion assessment

The effect of sleep quality and sleep quantity on concussion assessment

The effect of sleep quality and sleep quantity on concussion assessment

Based on our study results, recording sleep quality may be beneficial when trying to clinically interpret the number of symptoms reported by student-athletes and their respective severities. Although no association was found between change in sleep quality and change in GSC scores, it is reasonable to think that if there is a change in long-term sleep quality we may expect a change in the normal amount and severity of symptoms a person experiences. This may justify a reassessment of sleep quality every 1-2 months and reassessing baseline GSC if a change in sleep quality is observed. This would ensure that clinicians are fully aware of any changes in baseline symptoms before a symptom assessment would be employed as part of a multi-faceted concussion management plan. Since sleep quality did not affect neurocognitive function or balance performance no changes to these aspects of the baseline testing procedures appear warranted even if a subject displayed poor sleep quality.
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The Effect of Sleep Quantity and Quality on Adults' Blood Pressure: Yazd, 2014-2015

The Effect of Sleep Quantity and Quality on Adults' Blood Pressure: Yazd, 2014-2015

shaped relationship: as the prevalence of hypertension for people with sleep duration less than 5 hours and more than 10 hours were higher than for people with sleep duration 8-10 hours s (P<0.001). Gottlieb showed that such a relationship does exist. He maintained that the blood pressure is in its lowest rate among people with 7-8 hours’ sleep, and people with long sleep or inadequate sleep are more likely to suffer from high blood pressure compared to this group (22) . However, our study attributed the highest OR (1.27 hypertension to those with the longest sleep duration. The results have shown that 54% of the examined people had appropriate sleep quality, but 45% did not; this is in unison with the study of Mirzayi et al. which covered 50% of samples with sleep quality disorders (16) . In the current study, increase in taking sleeping pills has raised blood pressure, but this relationship was not significant. However, the OR of hypertension in people taking sleeping pills 3 times or more in a week was 1.29 times higher than those with no experience of taking sleeping pills; this relationship was significant. The studies have revealed that sleeping pills decrease blood pressure by affecting sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems (23) . In this study, increase in having nightmares lowers blood pressure significantly. Houyez showed that there is a significant relation between nightmare frequency and systolic blood pressure (24) , which conforms to
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Barnes-et-al-Abusive-Supervision-AMJ-2015-1063.final_.pdf

Barnes-et-al-Abusive-Supervision-AMJ-2015-1063.final_.pdf

Barnes (2012) further noted that sleep quantity and quality have parallel additive effects on self- regulation. Although we predicted such parallel effects, the effects for sleep quantity were generally not supported. It is possible that this is simply the result of sampling error, but this is difficult to as- sess. The p values for sleep quantity were not close to conventional cutoffs, indicating that there would have had to be considerable levels of such sampling error to create a Type II error. An alternative pos- sibility is that supervisors are more aware of their sleep quantity than quality, and are more carefully monitoring their behavior after low sleep quantity but not poor sleep quality. Another possibility is that chronic sleep deprivation may be more pow- erful than acute sleep deprivation in predicting abusive supervision. Although we do not have any measures of chronic sleep deprivation, future re- search may do well to examine this question. Moreover, there is some evidence in the extant lit- erature of a possible threshold effect with quantity. Christian and Ellis (2011) found a difference be- tween those above and below 6 hours of sleep, and, in our sample, we found that only 13% of the ob- servations of supervisor sleep quantity achieved this level of deprivation. This may have limited our ability to explain variance in abusive supervision by restricting the range of the independent variable. Further, sleep quality is a variable that might be subject to more variation than quantity.
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Eveningness and cognition/behavior in school-aged children: What is the role of sleep quantity and sleep quality?

Eveningness and cognition/behavior in school-aged children: What is the role of sleep quantity and sleep quality?

It must be mentioned that in this study we explored correlations between variables, and that there is not necessarily a causal relation between the variables analyzed. It might be that impaired cognitive and behavioral functioning affects sleep-wake times, in the direction of less sleep and lower sleep quality, by which persons are identified as tending more towards the evening type. When experiencing impaired daytime functioning people might have trouble falling asleep, for instance due to excessive worrying (internalizing problems) or hyperactivity (externalizing problems). However, there have been several studies on the effect of shifting the biological clock and the effect of this on behavioral and cognitive functioning. Shifting the biological clock was tried in various ways by interventions such as chronotherapy, bright light therapy (BLT), and melatonin treatment. In a case study, Gruber, Grizenko, and Joober (2007) report on a boy whose sleep, cognitive performance, and behavioral functioning improved after one week of BLT. Szeinberg, Borodkin, and Dagan (2006) report on melatonin treatment involving adolescents, and found improved sleep as well as a decrease in difficulties at school. In contrast, another study showed that sleep duration improved after melatonin treatment, but this did not result into improved cognitive and behavioral functioning (Van der Heijden, Smits, Van Someren, Ridderinkhof, & Gunning, 2007). Moreover, Sadeh et al. (2003) found an improved performance on tasks regarding working memory and sustained attention in children who extended their sleep. These results point to an influence of sleep on daytime functioning.
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Investigating the Effect of Lavender Essential oil on Sleep Quality in Patients Candidates for Angiography

Investigating the Effect of Lavender Essential oil on Sleep Quality in Patients Candidates for Angiography

The present study showed that lavender aromatherapy has no statistically significant effect on sleep quality in candidates for angiography hospitalized in the CCU. In the assessment of Lytle et al. of the effect of lavender essential oil in sleep quality patients in the CCU using the Richards- Campbell Sleep Questionnaire, the average sleep score in the intervention group was higher than in the control group and sleep quality improved, but the difference between the scores on the test scale were not statistically significant 19 . In addition, in the
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ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF SLEEP HYGIENE ON SLEEP QUALITY OF THE ELDERLY

ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF SLEEP HYGIENE ON SLEEP QUALITY OF THE ELDERLY

The study conducted by Drake et al (2013) entitled "Effect on Sleep Taken 0.3 or 6 Hours before Going to Bed" states that 400 mg of caffeine consumed 6 hours before bedtime will reduce the quantity of sleep by approximately 1 hour. Caffeine inhibits the release of serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine so that the stage of awakening increases and insomnia occurs. [13] Based on the research results on 30 elderly people, it can be concluded that there are significant differences in the quality of sleep before and after being given the practice of sleep hygiene. Before the practice of sleep hygiene, it showed that there are 6 people (20%) who experienced good sleep quality and 24 people (80%) who experienced poor sleep quality. Meanwhile, after the practices of sleep hygiene, it was found that 17 people (56.7%) experienced good sleep quality and as many as 13 people (43.3%) experienced poor sleep quality. The results of the Wilcoxon test obtained a value of p = 0,000 (<0.05) which means that there is a significant difference between the quality of sleep before and after the practice of sleep hygiene.
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Effect of Eating out on Quality and Quantity of Sleep among Japanese in Their 20s

Effect of Eating out on Quality and Quantity of Sleep among Japanese in Their 20s

The strength of this study lies in the fact that we analyzed the effects of eating out or skipping meals on quality and quantity of sleep. However, this study also has several limitations. First, due to the nature of the cross-sectional study de- sign, causal relationships between dietary habits and sleep quality should be in- terpreted with caution. Second, information on dietary habits and sleep quality was subjective, and can be considered as lacking objectivity. Further interven- tional studies by objective assessment of skipping meals or eating out and sleep quality will be needed.
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Contribution of sound in the Intensive Care Unit environment to sleep disruption

Contribution of sound in the Intensive Care Unit environment to sleep disruption

normal hearing) and 42 dB(A) in 1960 to 72 dB(A) and 60 dB(A) in 2005. This is 20-40 dB(A) higher than the guidelines of the WHO recommend. Because in an ICU patients are monitored and cared for around-the-clock it is noisy 24 hours a day 16 . However, the relative contribution of this environmental factor to sleep disturbance in ICU patients is difficult to assess. In patients, researchers have only been able to correlate 10-40% of arousals and awakenings to sudden peaks in sound 11,25 . Additionally, patients in critical care settings have limited or no exposure to circadian rhythm stimuli such as bright light 51 . Artificial lighting is of insufficient intensity and the timing of light exposure is often counterproductive because exposure at night, even at lower intensities, has an adverse effect on sleep timing 51 . Further, studies examining the effectiveness of sleep promoting interventions show various results ranging between deterioration and relative improvements of 10% to 68% 41 , using various approaches such as behavioural modification, earplugs, eye masks, sound masking by adding other sounds, and improving absorption using acoustic materials. In one study, sleep quantity and quality even seemed to be less after implementation of behaviour modifications
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The effect of physical activity on sleep quality, well-being, and affect in academic stress periods

The effect of physical activity on sleep quality, well-being, and affect in academic stress periods

The major strengths of this study include the longitudinal design and the usage of AS as a naturalistic stressor. How- ever, the inclusion of only one baseline measure may have been inadequate. For future studies, it may be of interest to include more than one baseline measure in times of little stress to determine if there is any variability in the dependent variables outside of high stress times. External validity of the results should be limited to the specific nature of the sample, as mostly psychology students participated. Results of the present study point to the importance of physical activity in AS periods. Therefore, it can be assumed that the results can provide the basis for activity interventions, which can be offered to students in AS periods to help them maintain their activity levels to buffer the negative effects of stress on health. Another limitation of the present study is that only self-report measures were used. In terms of the activity measure, this might have led to an erroneous assessment of the actual amount of physical activity due to social desirable responding. In this vein, a study conducted by Dyrstad et al revealed that people tend to overestimate their activity time ascertained via self-report measures when compared to accelerometer data. 63 However, participants of the present
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Relation between quality and quantity of sleep and psychological distress among hospitalized patients

Relation between quality and quantity of sleep and psychological distress among hospitalized patients

being allowed to fall asleep. He was not, however, reported to experience symptomatology consistent with hyperactive delirium or hallucinations (Gulevich G. et al, 1966). However, if ill patients are subjected to wakefulness of even disturbed sleep for a fraction of the above listed experience, they are more prone to develop psychological distress. This observational study was aimed at determining the pattern, quantity and quality of sleep and the prevalence, causes and effect of sleep deprivation / disturbance among patients hospitalized at the elective wards of a tertiary care hospital.
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<p>The Effect of Sleep Quality on Students&rsquo; Academic Achievement</p>

<p>The Effect of Sleep Quality on Students&rsquo; Academic Achievement</p>

Sweileh and his colleagues in a study on 400 Palestinian students concluded that academic achievement was not corre- lated with sleep quality. 15 In another study on 189 medical students in Pakistan, there was no signi fi cant association between lack of sleep and test scores. 16 In this regard, there is a possibility of sleep disorder in students, and this possibility has been expressed for the lack of academic achievement, but it has not been clearly explained. 11 In another study, sleepiness during the day (not the quality and quantity of sleep) was identi fi ed as an independent predictor of academic success. 5 In a similar study again the time it takes to fall sleep and the wake-up time (not the total amount of sleep) were associated with academic success, 14 where the total amount of sleep in adolescents with a dynamic mind was not related to their academic achievement. 24 In contrast to such studies that emphasize lack of association or low association, there are
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Assessment of sleep quality of university students

Assessment of sleep quality of university students

thalamus) generates the sleep promoting neuro hormones melatonin. Melatonin level increases between 2:00 -4:00 A.M. Aberration in melatonin creation lead to sleep difficulty (Purves D. et al., 2001). One of the major physiologic process of human body is sleep, around 25-40% of young people experience sleep problem (Lazaratou H. et al., 2005 & Garcia L.M.A. et al., 2004). Study in China showed 16.9% adults suffering from sleep problem (Liu X. et al., 2000). Sleep plays an important role for the health and affecting stability of individuals, poor sleep affects emotions in the outward appearance of depression (Kimberly. O’ et al., 2016). Digital media use (including computer & mobile phone) among university students prior to sleep negatively effect on sleep. Good sleep is necessary for proper functioning of body physical & mental health of students (Kathryn .M. et al., 2016). Study showed that depression, pressures for academic performance and anxiety among university students result in inadequate quality of sleep (Seblewngel. L. et al., 2012).
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<p>The effect of night shift on sleep quality and depressive symptoms among Chinese nurses</p>

<p>The effect of night shift on sleep quality and depressive symptoms among Chinese nurses</p>

of poor sleep quality and depressive symptoms still poses a health concern about nurses working night shifts. Second, owing to the limitation of the questionnaire design, work schedules could only be classified into day vs night shifts, leaving other domains of shift work undetermined. Finally, nurses working night shifts were younger, had lower job rank and worked longer hours. These factors might impose some selection bias on the results, although we had adjusted for these potential confounders in the logistic regression analysis. Future research should improve the assessment of shift work patterns. Finally, aggression and violence among nurses were not measured.
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<div>Among substance-abusing traffic offenders, poor sleep and poor general health predict lower driving skills but not slower reaction times</div>

<div>Among substance-abusing traffic offenders, poor sleep and poor general health predict lower driving skills but not slower reaction times</div>

Substance-abusing male traffic offenders undergoing a thorough driving-related assessment took part in the present cross-sectional study. Although the assessment was manda- tory for all traffic offenders as a consequence of violating traffic rules under the influence of psychotropic substances, taking part in this study and providing data for scientific ends were not mandatory. Accordingly, all eligible participants were informed about the aim of this study and the anonymous data handling. Thereafter, they signed a written informed consent. Participants came once to our research center, and all assessments took place in the late morning during 11 am and 2 pm. The first part of the assessment lasted for about 20 minutes, which includes the following: study information, signing the written informed consent, and completing the self-rating questionnaires. The second part lasted for about 15 minutes, which includes the following: measuring auditory and visual reaction time (see details below). Collectively, the entire assessment including welcome and discharge lasted for about 45 minutes. Data collection took place between June 2016 and April 2017. The review board of the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS; Kermanshah, Iran) approved the study, which was performed in accordance with the rules laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments.
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Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers effect on Sleep Quality

Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers effect on Sleep Quality

Despite emitting substantially less blue light than natural sun- light, this dramatic rise in electronic usage begins to pose problems. Estimates from population studies indicate that the average Amer- ican spends more than 10 hours per day viewing screens and this is only increasing [31]. A recent survey reported that 9 out of 10 Americans reported using a technological device in the hour be- fore bed with among those respondents under 30 years old, smart- phones were the most popular device. This has led to an alteration of this groups’ natural sleep patterns [32]. The most common com- plaint was a delayed bed time and shorter sleep [33]. One potential reason for this is the blue light that is emitted from these devices and the inhibitory effect it has on melatonin release. The monetary repercussions from sleeplessness are vast and are not only local- ized to the United States.
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Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

We went to the CCU at 7:00, when the patients were at rest after breakfast. At the start of the study (in the sec- ond day of hospitalization) we asked all the patients in both groups to respond the PSQI. In the illiterate sub- jects, the questions were read by the researcher and the subjects answers were recorded in the questionnaire. Moreover, we gathered patients’ demographic and clini- cal data through their medical records. The onset of intervention was the second night of hospitalization. In the control group, patient received the sleep care routinely provided in the study setting. The routine sleep care included of reducing environmental noise, decreasing indoor lighting level, and providing nurs- ing care during daytime to avoid interrupting patients’ sleep for nighttime. Patients in the experimental group received routine sleep care as well as eye mask for eight hours (22:00 - 6:00) each night. During this period, eye masks were applied on the patients’ eyes and its correct usage was checked by the first researcher. In the morn- ing of the fourth day of the study (i.e. after the third eye mask session), we asked patients in both groups to fill out the PSQI again.
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Effect of Yoga on Sleep Quality

Effect of Yoga on Sleep Quality

Hariprasad VR et al 1 examine the effects of yoga intervention on sleep quality and found that, the subjects in yoga group has significant improvement in total sleep quality score. Manjunath and Telles 2 observe that yogic intervention with techniques like physical postures and regulated breathing brought about improvement in the sleep latency, sleep duration and feeling of being rested. Karen M. Mustian et al in their study "Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial of Yoga for Sleep Quality Among Cancer Survivors", (Journal of Clinical Oncology, September 2013) find that Yoga participants demonstrated greater improvements in global sleep quality and, secondarily, subjective sleep quality, daytime dysfunction, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and medication use at post intervention (all P ≤ .05) compared with standard care participants. As observed in earlier studies, Chen KM et al 3 found that yoga-intervention has improved the total sleep quality in elderly living in old age home. Bankar et al 4 observe that regular Yoga exercises in the daily routine of elderly people can help to achieve good sleep quality thereby improving the quality of life.
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Sensor-Based Sleep Quality Index (SB-SQI): A New Metric to Examine the Association of Office Workstation Type on Stress and Sleep

Sensor-Based Sleep Quality Index (SB-SQI): A New Metric to Examine the Association of Office Workstation Type on Stress and Sleep

Advances in wearable technologies, biomechanical modeling of the human body, digital connectivity, and signal processing have opened new avenues for developing objective metrics to monitor wellbeing of individuals in real world conditions. Wearable technologies not only enable assessing wellbeing metrics (e.g., stress, physical activities, etc) during work and after work hours, but also allow quantifying sleep parameters and tracking daily fluctuations in sleep patterns. Recent advances in signal processing and sensor technology have also improved accuracy of measuring sleep parameters, such as sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, and time-in-bed compared to the gold standard of a sleep lab assessment (i.e., polysomnography or PSG), opening up the opportunity to accurately determine sleep quality outside the sleep lab. 15 Such technologies have been
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Repeated sleep-quality assessment and use of sleep-promoting interventions in ICU.

Repeated sleep-quality assessment and use of sleep-promoting interventions in ICU.

To describe sleep quality using repeated subjective assessment and the on-going use of sleep promoting interventions in intensive care. Both the measurement and promotion of sleep are challenging in the complex environment of the intensive care unit. Repeated subjective assessment of patients’ sleep in the intensive care unit and use of sleep- promoting interventions has not been widely reported. An observational study was conducted in a 58-bed adult intensive care unit. Sleep quality was assessed using the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire each morning. Intensive care unit audit sleep- promoting intervention data were compared to data obtained prior to the implementation of a sleep guideline. Patients answered open-ended questions about the facilitators and deterrents of their sleep in the intensive care unit. Descriptive statistics were performed. Audit data from the intensive care unit quality database were examined. An independent sample t-test was performed to compare self-reported sleep quality (Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire Total scores) of patients cared for prior to the time the guideline was implemented and after the guideline was implemented. Content analysis was used to explore responses to the open-ended questions on facilitators and deterrents of sleep. The sample (n=50) was predominately male (76%), with a mean age of 62.6±16.9 years. Sleep quality was assessed on 2 days or more for 21 patients. The majority of patients (98%) received sleep-promoting interventions. Sleep quality had not improved significantly since the guideline was first implemented. The mean Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire score was 47.9±24.1mm. The main sleep deterrents were discomfort and noise. Frequently cited facilitators were nothing (i.e. nothing helped) and analgesia. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire was used on repeated occasions, and sleep-promoting interventions were used extensively. There was no evidence of improvement in sleep quality since the implementation of a sleep guideline. The use of the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire for the subjective self-assessment of sleep quality in intensive care unit patients and the implementation of simple promoting interventions by intensive care unit clinicians is both feasible and may be the most practical way to assess sleep in this context.Relevance to clinical practice. The use of the RCSQ for the subjective self-assessment of sleep quality in ICU patients and the implementation of simple promoting interventions by ICU clinicians is both feasible and may be the most practical way to assess sleep in the ICU context.
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Lovgren_unc_0153M_19292.pdf

Lovgren_unc_0153M_19292.pdf

were obtaining low sleep quantity regularly, then they may have stopped completing the questionnaire due to morning fatigue. Perhaps participants obtaining significantly lower sleep quantity stopped completing the questionnaire to not be reminded of their poor sleep. Upon visual observation, the sleep of subjects excluded from this study did appear to be decreased as compared to subjects who were retained. Particularly in the morning cohort, there were observations of subjects reporting 5 or fewer hours of sleep per night, but these subjects were excluded due to poor completion rate on the daily questionnaire. Leeder et al. reports the athletic population achieves the same quantity sleep as the general population. 1 Ohayon et al. states about 75% of participants derived from the general population in 15 U.S. states in their study reported sleeping between 6 and 8 hours per day. 38 The sleep quantity reported in this study falls within this 6 to 8 hours, and therefore the athletes who participated in this study do not appear to have different sleep quantity when compared to the general population. However, comparison of the collegiate athlete to the general population is not the purpose of this study; no data was collected to support this comparison. Furthermore, the National Sleep Foundation recommends 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. 9 It appears the athletes in this study did acquire the recommended sleep quantity.
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