Top PDF ALL I WANT TO DO IS RUN LIKE THE WIND! N

ALL I WANT TO DO IS RUN LIKE THE WIND! N

ALL I WANT TO DO IS RUN LIKE THE WIND! N

I grew up near my primary school in Trinidad. It was Roman Catholic, and had a small church on its grounds, which everyone from the neighbourhood would go to. There was an L-shaped canal, about four feet deep, that ran behind the church and to the left of my schoolyard, which had been paved so it could act as a parking lot for Sunday mass. There were no fences around the river ravine, as we called it, because it acted like a moat, defending the church and school from the small forest-like growth and bush that had reclaimed the land beyond, where the trains used to run. During the dry season, there was little water in the moat. Enough dry points were exposed so that you could hop over the water and climb back over to the other side. Most kids would stay on the school side and try to catch the small freshwater fish that swam there. These fish would leap out of your net, and if you threw them on the banks, they would try and make their way back into the water. We liked to catch these long, black eels, even though we were told that they would turn into zombies and bite our little toes off. We liked to parade them around, to see who had the best tail, and at the end of the day, we would throw them back in. Not because of the old wives‟ tales, but because there was only one fish worth keeping: Blacko Jr, son of Master Black. Now, Master Black was the king of all ravine fish. He had a three-inch body and a four-inch tail that would open up like a Chinese fan, which extended out with long blue, orange and yellow streamers that darted in the air every time he leapt out of the water. No one had ever caught him.
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Novel: No More Yellow

Novel: No More Yellow

it kept repeating itself, but I wasn’t sure if it was happening or not or what it all meant. Sometimes, I would think of Mum and her putting her hair up into a bun with a chopstick through it. Then the next minute one side of her face would be caved in and bloody and I’d be watching laughing as if she’s Lady Macbeth just jumped off the turrets like in the Polanski film. I didn’t think that was fair. I don’t think I liked her even then but I didn’t think it was fair. Maybe if I was much kinder to her, showed her more kindness, was more of a kind person - what’s another word for kind? One of the unexpected things was that I thought quite early on that it was OK to dislike her as I hadn’t chosen her. She could be outside of me, just like anyone else around me was, so that when I heard her screaming and outright rage I didn’t need to understand her or make it all my fault. She was a part of my past in the way that being a child had become the old me. I was becoming someone else, accepting what life threw up instead of denying my place in this new world. My dislike had a place, just as the new winklepickers I brought that needed re-heeling already, had a place. Wearing them took me to that new place, as did the dyed grey (the black colouring didn’t take) pencil skirt I persuaded Mum to buy for me. At the time I wanted to say whatever I wanted to say and let go of the childish side of listening - listening to grown ups, doing as I was told - 1 could let them know how I felt instead of being careful with my words in the way that children always are.
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“I Want to See All My Friends At Once’’: Arthur Russell and the Queering of Gay Disco

“I Want to See All My Friends At Once’’: Arthur Russell and the Queering of Gay Disco

Robbie Leslie (Leslie 15.3.2006). It was at the Saint that the quasi-mythical A-list dancer, who was born at the Tenth Floor and became entrenched at Flamingo, began to believe in his own immortality, at least until AIDS cut short the dream. As with the “heroic masculinities” identified by Judith Halberstam in Female Masculinity, the heroic masculinity of the dancers at the Saint depended “on the subordination of alternative masculinities” (Halberstam 1998: 1). The Garage was rejected as a inferior venue that might be visited on a “slumming trip” (Lee 18.2.2004), with Levan derided for his emphasis on R&B-oriented sounds (Lawrence 2004a: 425–26). At the Saint, the music rarely veered away from Hi-NRG, a musical form that, in Dyer’s terms, evoked the pounding, restrictive phallocentrism of rock (even if it was complemented with “sweet” vocals). 13 This aesthetic shift reflected the way in which the Saint became the most sexually charged white gay venue of its type. Whereas previous white gay venues evoked sex, sex never took place. Instead, men would wait until the end of the night, when they would routinely head to the bathhouses. But at the Saint sex—which took place on the venue’s balconies—became a core part of the experience, and the relentless phallocentric music would have worked as an appropriate soundtrack to these activities. As John Giove, a white gay dancer who danced regularly at both the Saint and the Garage, notes: “The Saint queens did not like their music black. They liked their black divas wailing to a Hi-NRG beat (think Evelyn Thomas ‘High Energy’) or to a Euro-beat (think Phyllis Nelson ‘Don’t Stop the Train’), but the real black music did not get played there” (Giove 17.11.2005). Giove adds: “The music at the Garage had feeling and emotion. When Larry Levan started playing MFSB’s ‘Love is the Message,’ you never knew where he was going to go with it. That song could be the background and then he would mix in and then out other songs. Larry was the only DJ that could put together ‘Go Bang’ by Dinosour L and MFSB” (Giove 24.11.2005).
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The Damage Done and Other Stories

The Damage Done and Other Stories

Finally, for my professors, words don’t seem like enough. Joanna Brent Leake, thank you for what felt like gentle encouragement but was actually a tough, but necessary, critique. Your humor and poise kept me sane all through Bayou. Joseph Boyden, I was lucky enough to have numerous workshops with you, and I appreciate all of your help with my writing, but I also value that you’ve invited me into your life the past few years and treated me like family. Rick Barton, I want you to know that the students see how hard you work for the program and that it’s appreciated. Thank you for wine nights, your sarcastic humor, endless counsel, and for believing in my writing until I could. Barb Johnson, thank you for making me both a better writer and a better human being. If you were paid for the many hours you spent schooling me on craft and life, you’d be a rich woman. In all
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'I want to prove to myself that I can do this!': Risk and uncertainty in the construction of personal biographies for access students

'I want to prove to myself that I can do this!': Risk and uncertainty in the construction of personal biographies for access students

In respect of future economic rewards, Davies and Williams (2001) claim that students tend to consider the decision to return to study in a fairly instrumentalist manner, as a form of 'private investment'. For many mature students, study on the course is usually seen as a means to change - and hence improve - their lives, especially in terms of bettering their position in the job market. Underlying this is a general belief that the 'return' on such an 'investment', usually in terms of greater career choice and earning potential, is high. Sasha for example sees her future without the course as doing ‘soul-destroying jobs that I don’t like, simply because I need the money’. Geraldine also ‘wants to use (her) brain…(and)…to do something with a bit of job satisfaction’. Both feel a degree to be the best means of achieving a more enjoyable working environment. In the sample of the interview cohort chosen for consideration here, greater job satisfaction was generally rated above increased earning potential in terms of reasons for seeking to undertake a degree course. From the interviewees as a whole, there was a strong desire to ‘put something back’ into society, and most sought public sector careers as longer-term goals.
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Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?

Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?

Abstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.
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I want to media multitask and I want to do it now: Individual differences in media multitasking predict delay of gratification and system-1 thinking

I want to media multitask and I want to do it now: Individual differences in media multitasking predict delay of gratification and system-1 thinking

Regardless of the reason for the association between media multitasking and delay discounting, the present results suggest that HMMs have a reactive decision- making style that promotes current desires (money, ease of processing) at the expense of accuracy and future re- wards, providing empirical support for a hypothesis that has probably run through many of our minds on occa- sion when viewing others using media. Given that greater delay discounting is related to substance misuse, problematic gambling, overeating, and poor financial management (see MacKillop et al., 2011 for a review), the present results suggest that HMMs may be at risk for these behaviors as well, and it would be interesting to examine the frequency of these behaviors in LMMs versus HMMs. Furthermore, more investigation of the
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No B.S.: The Contemporary Practice of Game Education, Design, and Development

No B.S.: The Contemporary Practice of Game Education, Design, and Development

You've hit on exactly the reason the management has set up the company the way it has. I was once told something like "we do the big budget, multi-year projects because we love to do them and they're what we want to be most well known for, but the money comes from titles like Baby Pals/Purr Pals and games developed for mobile platforms." I think that in our case, the shift came from the understanding that unless you're a Top 20 developer who could lose one publisher and be assured of picking up another one right away, things are going to happen from time to time on the big projects that are going to be a serious danger to a developer our size without that extra means of support. I think it was also motivated by the speed boost that the growing number of dependable tools and delivery platforms like Steam, XBLA, PSN, and WiiWare offer in turning a game concept into a realized, shippable product, plus the continuing swell of casual gamers who not only accept but value more reasonably-sized products with pick-up-and-play sensibilities.
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Portrayal of Disability on the Popular Culture Television Show - Glee.

Portrayal of Disability on the Popular Culture Television Show - Glee.

WILL: (sighing and picking up a WMHS yearbook) You remember high school? Remember what it’s like? Those kids get labeled the second they walk through the door freshman year. Geek, punk, jock, queer. I’ve seen who these kids in Glee Club really are. No labels, no preconceptions, their true spirits. Yes, most of them are not stars…but they shine like them. Do you know what happens when a star dies, Bryan? It doesn’t just disappear. It turns into this black hole, this giant energy-sucking mass that doesn’t just collapse in on itself; it takes away any light that comes close down with it. You take away Glee, you’re not just putting out those kids’ lights; you’re creating 13 black holes. (sighs) I want you to take my part. You should play Jean Valjean. I want you to understand how important the arts are for a person’s soul. You’re a black hole right now. Maybe this will help you remember what it’s like to be a star.
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Psychology Scholarship College of Liberal Arts (COLA) 2013 To tell or not to tell? Youth's responses to unwanted internet experiences.

Psychology Scholarship College of Liberal Arts (COLA) 2013 To tell or not to tell? Youth's responses to unwanted internet experiences.

I mean very personal questions, like what your body looks like or sexual things you have done?” and “Did anyone on the Internet ever ask you to do something sexual that you did not want [r]

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Who do I think I am and where do I want to be? A study of Indian international VET students in Australia

Who do I think I am and where do I want to be? A study of Indian international VET students in Australia

everything is alright for me. I am very happy and don’t want to go back” (Student N1). Naisha found that even though she had studied “half the year English convent school but the pronunciation is different, slang is a different” (Student N1). As she was motivated and determined to improve her English skills, Naisha used a number of mechanisms to assist her, then “after like two or three months I am just fantastic” (Student N1). Naisha also commented on the differences between her previous Indian learning environment and her VET studies. She told me “It’s all practical. No more like a book worms like we are used to before--- We are using this… it is useful” (Student N1). She also believed that her Indian studies were “just a wastage of time. No skills, no tactile skills” (Student N1). Naisha also confirmed Gafur’s comment on Indian study environments with “like in India if you are not good in studies you are beat by teacher. Sometimes they deal with you verbally or physically, smashing you know, they are really hard, I don’t want to remind my school times” (Student N1). She followed this with “they don’t want to be ah you are skilful person like you have learned on your own with the new techniques, no” (Student N1). Naisha evidenced positive psychological and emotional reinforcement of her efficacy from both her Australian community and her academic community environments. Her ability to remain motivated, confine any anxiety feelings and cope with
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"Do I really want to do this?" Longitudinal cohort study participants' perspectives on postal survey design: a qualitative study

"Do I really want to do this?" Longitudinal cohort study participants' perspectives on postal survey design: a qualitative study

Follow-up of non responders increases survey response rates [7,15]. In this study, a pre-notification letter (the information sheet) was followed by the questionnaire. Another copy of the questionnaire was sent to non- responders after two weeks and they were telephoned after a further two weeks if a questionnaire had not been received. Those with no telephone number avail- able were sent a third copy of the questionnaire [12]. It is difficult to interpret how acceptable the methods of follow-up were because non-responders were not interviewed. However, for interview participants, these methods were generally acceptable although not every- one would have appreciated a telephone call; “ If I hadn ’ t filled it out by the second time... [I was] not going to do it” (P4). However, 41 participants in the follow-up postal survey did return their surveys after being telephoned increasing the follow-up rate by 9%. There was a sense that surveys would be completed straight away or they would be forgotten; “They sit there until you’re reminded about them” (P1). Although no statistically significant difference in response between follow-up of non-responders in less than 31 days or between 31 and 60 days has been reported [7], in this study allowing two weeks for returning the surveys was thought to be a good time- frame; “ It allowed you time, but not too much ” (P10) and “ If you haven ’ t done something within two weeks well that’s probably gone out of your mind” (P2). Completion of the follow-up postal survey and interview Some participants had forgotten about the baseline sur- vey when the follow-up questionnaire arrived twelve months later. This could reduce the likelihood of obser- vation bias which can occur when exposures and out- come are measured without blinding (in this case by participant self-report), for example if the participant was more likely to report a certain outcome depending on exposures reported. However, it is unlikely that parti- cipants would have an agenda for the survey, making this form of bias improbable. Participants completed the follow-up survey because they felt a sense of duty and could see why they should follow through having entered the study. They felt the baseline survey was a
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Bias-Free Children’s Books
The Continuing Crusade Of Nancy Arnez

Bias-Free Children’s Books The Continuing Crusade Of Nancy Arnez

To such a charge, Arnez replies, “I’m not a book burner. I’m not saying, ‘Burn these books. ’ But I am saying, ‘You don’t have to buy them and shouldn’t buy them if they contain offensive images. ’ ” While she is opposed to a book like “Jake and Honey- bunch,” she realizes “there are so many ramifications to the First Amendment is­ sue because if I say, ‘Take certain books off the shelves,’ then somebody else can say, ‘We can’t have anything on the shelves about Martin Luther King, Jr., because we don’t like him or about Malcolm X because we don’t like him. ’ So I wouldn’t want to be that extrem e— to say all books with some negative images should be banned — because others can be extreme about the things you think are important. That’s why I stress balance. ”
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I DON'T WANT TO DIE!

I DON'T WANT TO DIE!

The whole day flashed through my mind as I sat waiting. I remember the strange dream I had at dawn. I was trapped in a sealed transparent cage. I was admiring the beautiful red branching pattern running on its inner wallpaper. Suddenly I felt a warm air cushion blowing in my face. Before I knew it, it lifted me off the floor and yanked me against the wall. The red branches peeled erratically from the wall. The room became smaller and smaller and suffocated me. A stranger outside the room kept trying to break through the cage but to no avail. It felt exactly like the inside of a pressure cooker. Before I could blink, darkness overwhelmed me and I fell into a limitless abyss. I woke up with a start. Opening my house windows, I watched the birds fly away majestically into the sky. They seemed to announce a good augur today.
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Appropriation of the ‘Witch’ Stigma as White Women's Self-Empowerment

Appropriation of the ‘Witch’ Stigma as White Women's Self-Empowerment

Ah, Jax. A man’s man or the typical jock. Named after a Mortal Kombat character, Jax excels at sports, girls, and of course, being adored. Even when down, his rep is untouchable, and seldom does he have to prove himself outside of a game. Really, he wins at life. I had to put this part of me in the show because it played a tremendous role in my late teens. Most people know that though very short lived, I was a collegiate athlete at LSU, but not many know that I was a walk on. That is right- walk on. I tried out for the basketball team as a freshman in high school- my friend and I were told by the coach that we had the talent to start varsity but he did not like our attitude. I tried out for the football team twice and made the team, but never finished or started a season. The first time I was cut for missing two-a-days; did not even know what the hell that was at the time, plus I told the coaches weeks before I was going on vacation. The second time, I quit; I did not play in our season opener against Barbe and after being down 42-7 in the first, why did I quit you may ask? I did not even get a jersey because I missed practice the day before (due to a doctor’s appointment I TOLD them about) and they wanted the team to run one hundred 100s for losing. After I sat that game? I SCORED ON THE FOUR PLAYS I DID PLAY IN TWO SCRIMAGE PLAYS. Fuq outta here, no thank you. Track and field, you get the idea. I was kicked off or quit every sports team in high
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Auroras Adventure to the South Pole   V2

Auroras Adventure to the South Pole V2

things we spent a while on was the clothes we picked up in Christchurch – what each item is good for etc. Dan was a bit grumpy all morning, but the field trainer who ran the session was really cool. He knew that Aunty Bee had done his job last year, so he got her to do quite a lot of stuff. It was awesome seeing Aunty Bee as a trainer, maybe when I grow up I’d rather do that than be an explorer. You still get to go cool places, and you probably get paid better than explorers do. In the afternoon we went outside, and did a short walk. We got to practise things like signing out of the base, and calling in on the radio. It’s really important that the people at the base know where you are, so they can send help if you run into trouble. When we drive to the South Pole, Aunty Bee has said that we’ll have to make contact with Scott Base at least three times a day… That seems like a lot, but apparently if you go onto the sea ice, you need to call in every hour!
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Debate: What constitutes 'terminality' and how does it relate to a Living Will?

Debate: What constitutes 'terminality' and how does it relate to a Living Will?

We should not distribute living wills in a manner akin to a census form to be completed. These are life and death con- cerns and they should not be simply filed away on the chart without some serious dialogue. The purpose again is com- munication. The staff that helped her with her living will are responsible for generating discussion and ensuring that the patient understands all the implications of her decisions. The reasons behind the patient’s wishes are important. It does not matter if anyone agrees with her, but being privy to her philosophy on life enables all involved in her care to understand her values. In this regard we have a communica- tive process and a person, rather than a pencil and a survey. The rationality underlying the living will may be subtle, but very important. Perhaps she did not clearly understand what she meant when she agreed to refuse intubation, or, as we’ve seen, perhaps she did not know that terminal could mean different things to different people. Tailoring her wishes, for example acceding to a trial run of intuba- tion if she had a reasonable chance of recovery, may have been something she would have considered (which could have been included in her living will). Lay people however, may not have insight into the mechanics of living wills or life support systems. Perhaps they do not realize that they can have total control in their care and that they can ask for help, ask questions and be as specific as they want when composing these documents.
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My narrative falters, as it must : rethinking memory in recent Northern Irish fiction

My narrative falters, as it must : rethinking memory in recent Northern Irish fiction

Vermeer's letter paintings typically give little away, from The Love Letter through Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window to Mistress and Maid. This ambiguity allows Karen to identify with the girl and brings her immediately back to the moment of her rejection. Her memory comes in fragments, unbidden, and both the stimuli and the reaction to it is unpredictable: “She had no idea of what she would say and as she walked the events of the day splintered in her head and then reformed in sharp-edged, disconnected images – the pregnant girl reading the letter, the ice- skaters, the music in the church, a stranger’s tears”. 40 Caldwell’s novel also meditates on the partial and unpredictable operations of memory: “[In] too many books people’s memories come in seamless waves, perfectly coherent and lyrical. Recollections come like that one just did to me, searing, intense and jagged from nowhere, burning bright when before there was nothing”. 41 In both of these books, then, memory is not a mass, commemorative process but rather something difficult and complex, which does not always rise to the ‘right’ stimuli and provide a uniform response.
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Chance Destination

Chance Destination

She itched to get back to the P’Ceph and run a full diagnostic on its systems, though she felt on the verge of falling asleep sitting on the bed. It irked her that she hadn’t been able to pick and choose what was best for the P’Ceph before Nate ran a bunch of subjects through her motel room, but the money followed by the overwhelming praise of Nate given by his teammates had blunted her desire to rip the machine from him. The numerous stories about Nate being trustworthy, dependable and honest wore down her anger better than any essential bribe could. His teammates had made him look like Mother Teresa’s long lost child.
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The Text Doesn’t Stop at the End of the Page (or does it?): an exploration of how the novel form responds to digital interactivity through the cross-sited novel ‘Once in a Lifetime’

The Text Doesn’t Stop at the End of the Page (or does it?): an exploration of how the novel form responds to digital interactivity through the cross-sited novel ‘Once in a Lifetime’

I headed home on the tram feeling shattered. I felt like I’d been running for the past year, but the closer I got to home the more restless I felt. In my hands I carried the envelope and the cheque Dan had given me. I looked at the cheque. It wasn’t from the ABC. It was a personal cheque written by him. Was it really my share of the fee or was he giving me more money? Fuck, how rich could he be? Surely it must be my share. I’d never know unless I asked him and I didn’t want to do that. I stared at the three, the five and the two zeros. I wanted that amount of money, but I didn’t want those particular dollars: his dollars. I knew, though, that I would cash the cheque eventually. Sooner or later I’d find a way to rationalise that money into my account. A way to convince myself it was my money and I was somehow entitled to it. Poverty has a way of doing that to a person, especially a person like me. I didn’t want to be a person like me anymore. Almost without thinking, as I hopped off the tram and definitely without looking back, I screwed the cheque up and piffed it down a storm water drain. Gone. Don’t think about it. No big deal. I ran into the flat, hoping for what, I didn’t know. Amberley wasn’t there. There was, however, an envelope containing her key and a note from her brother stating that she’d asked him to clear out her stuff. There were no contact details. Nothing.
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