Top PDF WP: Social and Emotional Intelligence

WP: Social and Emotional Intelligence

WP: Social and Emotional Intelligence

Emotions and feelings not the same. Emotions are energy in motion; composite biological signals like a fast beating heart or sweaty palms. We are all experiencing emotions every single moment of every single day but we don’t necessarily feel them. Feelings are the awareness in our minds of the ‘energy in motion’. The energy is there, but we don’t necessarily feel it: we have not really learned to understand our own emotional life. To transform our lives, we have to understand that ultimately emotions will predict our health, personal sense of wellbeing, success, fulfilment, motivation and decisions. The good news is with awareness comes the ability to direct and manage our emotions – they are part of us, not something that is imposed on us.
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Emotional and Social Developmental Benefits of Summer Camp for Children: Examining the relationship between social capital and emotional intelligence

Emotional and Social Developmental Benefits of Summer Camp for Children: Examining the relationship between social capital and emotional intelligence

Over the last 150 years, camps have been providing children with opportunities for positive youth development. It is believed that attending camp allows children to develop supportive relationships with fellow campers and staff, engage in challenging activities, make decisions, and participate in new activities. This belief is consistent with research that leisure activities involve a variety of tasks which help increase adolescent development (Caldwell & Witt, 2011). These tasks include: autonomy development and self-determination; intrinsic and identified motivation, initiative, and goal-setting; achievement and competence; identity; civic engagement, community connections, and developing a moral compass; social skills and social connections; emotional response to leisure (Caldwell & Witt, 2011; Dworkin et al., 2003; Henderson et al., 2007; Thurber et al., 2007). Consequently, there is good reason to suggest that camps represent environments in which children can develop their social capital and emotional intelligence insofar as camp activities teach children how to relate to others emotionally and build positive relationships that lead to positive outcomes. For this study, the effect of social capital on the development of emotional intelligence is of particular interest.
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Creativity and Social Competence of Young Children: The Mediating Role of Emotional Intelligence

Creativity and Social Competence of Young Children: The Mediating Role of Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence of a child is the mental ability to grasp and control the mood of oneself and others [7]. Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to correctly perceive and express one's emotions with others and to control emotions in a positive way. Children who have emotional control ability are easy to adapt to society, while infants who lack emotional intelligence can’t control their own and others' emotions efficiently and have difficulties in interpersonal adjustment and also they showed maladaptive behaviors [7,8]. The social competence of young children refers to the ability to develop in a positive direction while effectively acquiring social goals while interacting with the environment [9]. Young children whose social competence is positively developed in early childhood are independent, achievement-oriented, and have a variety of social behaviors including effective interaction with others [10]. On the other hand, children with a lack of social competence have developmental difficulties such as having a negative self-concept for themselves or being rejected by peers [11].
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STUDY OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF ADOLESCENTS Mrs. Neetu Khokhar

STUDY OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF ADOLESCENTS Mrs. Neetu Khokhar

The youth is said to be the future of the nation upon which the destiny of the country depends to a large extent. Most of the students during adolescence suffer from frustrations, conflicts, complexes, anxieties and worries. They experience problems in physical, mental, social, emotional & other adjustments. Since, it is encountered by students during psychologically disturbing and difficult years of their adolescence; it is consequently major mental experience for most of them. However, whatever is needed is an understanding of their adjustment problems and thereby seeking the solution of those problems. Therefore, it becomes an important area of studying their adjustment problems. This study has been taken to know the relationship between emotional intelligence and social adjustment in adolescents because emotional intelligence includes traits like self-awareness, social deftness, and the ability to delay gratification, to be optimistic in the face of adversity, to channel strong emotions and show empathy towards others. It involves recognition, use, understanding and management of one’s and others emotional state to solve problems and regulate behavior.
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS IN RELATION TO THEIR GENDER, STREAM AND SOCIAL CATEGORY

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS IN RELATION TO THEIR GENDER, STREAM AND SOCIAL CATEGORY

The study was conducted to assess the emotional intelligence of prospective teachers. A sample comprised of 400 prospective teachers (200 male, 100 of each stream i.e., science and arts and 100 of each social category i.e., general and reserved as well as 200 female, 100 of each stream i.e., science and arts and 100 of each social category i.e., general and reserved) from the selected colleges of education from H.P. For this purpose data was collected using Roqan Emotional Intelligence Test by Prof. Roquiya Zainuddin and Anjum Ahmed. For analysis of the obtained data ‘Analysis of Variance’, (2x2x2) factorial design was used. The results indicated that Prospective teachers do not differ and interact significantly in the Emotional intelligence with respect to their gender, stream and social category.
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Organizational Support and Managers’ Ambidexterity in Social Enterprise: The Mediating Role of Emotional Intelligence

Organizational Support and Managers’ Ambidexterity in Social Enterprise: The Mediating Role of Emotional Intelligence

Instrumental support provided by the organization, especially information and resources, allows managers to make positive predictions by increasing flex- ibility of decision-making and creative thinking. Besides, it enhances the man- agers’ confidence to accomplish multiple tasks and make them proactively regu- late personal emotions to adapt to ambidextrous activities. What’s more, in- strumental support will make it convenient for managers to forecast and perce- ive others’ emotions. Emotional support provided by the organization, including respect, trust and concern from the superior, subordinate and other managers will inspire managers’ emotional intelligence. Firstly, emotional support will promote interpersonal communication to create a harmonious organizational atmosphere. It’s beneficial to enhance the cohesion by facilitating information sharing and emotional interaction which makes them more expert in identify emotions of themselves and others. This will help managers to identify them- selves and others “emotions, understand conflicting emotions, and better predict their own and others” emotions. Secondly, emotional support will endow man- agers with greater decision-making power and tolerance of errors so that they can improve their own ability to withstand pressure and cope with risk, which helps managers regulate emotions to hold positive and optimistic attitude to- wards failure and contradictory innovation activities. In terms of emotional reg- ulation, organizational supports will enable managers to self-discipline and self-motivate based on the principles of social exchange [54]. Managers will gen- erate a positive and optimistic emotional state of the work environment and tasks and become more confident in dealing with complex and conflicting tasks with the support of the organization [55]. In terms of emotional management, organizational support will help managers to regulate negative emotions rapidly and relieve emotional stress to respond positively to conflict activities [56].
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The Benefits of Teachers’ Workshops on Their Social and Emotional Intelligence in Four Countries

The Benefits of Teachers’ Workshops on Their Social and Emotional Intelligence in Four Countries

(SEL), has become increasingly important in many countries. The present study in- vestigated in four countries the development of teachers’ SEL, through which people develop their social and emotional intelligence, by using internationally widely-used Lions Quest (LQ) teacher workshops as an intervention. Possible changes in teachers’ attitudes, values, knowledge, and skills during the LQ were explored. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted using data from the pre-test responses of two coun- tries. This analysis produced three factors. The created factor structure was further confirmed using pre-test data from another two countries. Repeated measures ANOVA (GLM), giving its ability to perform overall comparisons in one step, and the specified follow-up comparisons were used to examine the gain scores between and within groups, and to statistically control for some characteristics. The results showed that the teachers perceived the importance of the LQ goals as more important after participating in the LQ teachers’ workshop. In addition, they felt more competence in implementing the LQ content in their classrooms. Further, teachers valued the LQ higher after the workshop. In the comparison group, however, no changes were found. In conclusion, LQ appears to fulfill the expectations of supporting teachers in implementing LQ content, including 21 st skills and SEL, in the classroom.
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Why Social and Emotional Intelligence Matters in Workplace: An Evidence from a Developing Country

Why Social and Emotional Intelligence Matters in Workplace: An Evidence from a Developing Country

in their private and professional lives. Although this belief may certainly apply in some contexts, it should be viewed with caution. It may be true that certain Intelligence Quotient (IQ) levels are required for a person to get a certain job and maintain it. However, it has been shown that people who really stand out in their work are those who possess traits beyond intellect i.e. maturity, experience in dealing with people and situations, and that Goleman [1] has been called emotional health. Intelligence, on the other hand, refers to a person’s ability to learn and remember information, to recognize concepts and their relations, and to apply the information in daily life in an adaptive way. In other words, it is a set of cognitive abilities that enable us to acquire knowledge for learning and solving problems. The importance of emotion in a person’s daily dealings at the workplace is inevitably interrelated with his intellect. Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Social and Emotional Intelligence (SEL)
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SOCIAL MATURITY IN RELATION TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF ADOLESCENTS

SOCIAL MATURITY IN RELATION TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF ADOLESCENTS

Table 1 show that the coefficient of correlation between emotional intelligence and social maturity of adolescents is 0.20,which is positive and significant at 0.01 level.So social maturity and emotional intelligence of adolescents are positively correlated.Therefore, Hypothesis 1: there exists no significant relationship between emotional intelligence and social maturity of adolescents stands rejected.Study conducted by Devi and Rani (2011),Pushpa (2015) supported ourresults that emotional intelligence was positively related to social maturity.This relationship appeared to result from the common influence of emotional stability of the adolescents. Emotional stability influence social development of the individual.
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Emotional intelligence, social emotions, parental involvement in the emotional life of senior preschoolers: development and interrelation

Emotional intelligence, social emotions, parental involvement in the emotional life of senior preschoolers: development and interrelation

socialization of the whole process of child development. Psychologists note the emergence of "intellectual emotions" in connection with the integration of the emotional and intellectual spheres. Preschoolers undergo the process of formation of social emotions (emotional processes that are affected by social standards). While developing, social emotions regulate human activity, influencing and regulating contacts with society, eventually becoming the main mechanism of socialization. In their opinion, in senior preschool age arises one of the central new formations of development: “emotional correction of behavior”, due to which emotional regulation becomes accessible to the child, which is manifested in the coordination of his behavior with a certain situation and the actions that the child performs. All this allows the child to adapt to the environment. [11] Emotional instability, anxiety or aggressiveness in a child’s behavior can not only complicate his communication with the world around, but also lead to a deformation of the personal development of preschoolers in general. Therefore, in modern studies of the emotional intelligence of preschoolers, the need for organizing targeted psychological and pedagogical work focused on developing emotional intelligence and enriching the emotional experience of preschoolers is substantiated [12, 13, 14].
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Emotional Intelligence and Ethics on Organizations

Emotional Intelligence and Ethics on Organizations

problem in data analysis according with the extrapolation method of Reference [57], since there was no significant differences for p > 0.05 between the values of the first (n = 101) and last (n = 101) quartiles of respondents. So, were not found significant differences between those who responded to the questionnaire before and after his forwarding. Companies’ contacts (e-mail) were collected on: http://www.portugalglobal.pt/PT/Internacionalizar/. The questionnaire application was accompanied by their filling instructions and a study objectives presentation. Participants were asked to respond the survey the most sincerely as possible, were assured of anonymity exis- tence and data confidentiality, and in case of interest in getting the results had the possibility to indicate an e-mail for sending. It was also pointed the voluntary na- ture of participation. The data collection process was performed automatically, hosting the questionnaire in an internet domain of the Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, consolidating all information in digital for- mat for subsequent export and statistical analysis in SPSS, version “IBM SPSS Statistics 19” and Microsoft Office Excel. The non-duplication of response was also assured with the creation of a code for each company. The companies were contacted by e-mail where was at- tached the link of the questionnaire, created and managed by the tool “Lime Survey”. The research key variables are Emotional Intelligence (EI), Individual Ethics (IE), Perceptions of Others Ethics (POE), Ethics and Success Perceptions (ESP) and Self-Esteem (SE). The Social De- sirability (SD), the biographical variables Age and Gen- der, and organizational variables Economic Activities Classification (EAC), number of Employees (NE), Turnover of last year (T) and Exports Percentage (EXP) are control variables.
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Emotional Intelligence: A Review of Researches

Emotional Intelligence: A Review of Researches

In recent time, the human mind added a new dimension which is now being held responsible for more success than intelligence. The term is called emotional intelligence (EI) and is measured as Emotional Quotient (EQ). Over the past several years, the term emotional intelligence has received much attention as a factor that is useful in understanding and predicting individual’s performance at work, at home, at school etc., (Katya and Swasthi 2005). A number of studies have concluded that emotional intelligence and related traditional measures of intelligence and human performance are as more predictive of academic and career success than intelligence quotient (IQ) tests and other measures of scholastic aptitude and achievement (Nelson and Low 2003). Research findings emphasized the necessity of including emotional skills development programs designed to improve student achievement and academic success. Elias et al.(1991) concluded that the teaching emotional and social skills is very important at school, it can affect academic achievement positively not only during the year they are taught , but during the years that fallow as well, teaching these skills has a long-term effect an achievement.
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Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Education

Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Education

Researchers found that transformational leadership predict higher ratings of effectiveness and satisfaction, higher group performance (Keller, 1995), and higher amount of effort on the part of subordinates (Seltzer & Bass, 1990) compared to transactional leadership. Researchers in the area of leadership have likewise proposed that effective transformational leaders must possess social and emotional intelligence. These elements can also be include in teacher education system as Goleman emphasized that leaders high in emotional intelligence are key to organizational success; leaders must have the capacity to sense employees' feelings about their work environments, to intervene when problems arise, to manage their own emotions in order to gain the trust of the employees, and to understand the political and social conventions within an organization (Goleman, 2001).
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Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

Regarding the whole sample, it was proved that Hungarian teachers are the most uncertain in sensing and controlling emotions (mode 3 in the case of both items, standard deviation 1.006 and 1.064). Other components of emotional intelligence are felt to be more characteristic features of themselves (mode 4). The social aspect of emotions is well-known. Hochschild (1990) claims emotions show our place in the world in relation to other people, our aims and interests. We learn to control our emotions through socialization. The ability to control emotions is one of the most significant aspects of emotional intelligence, which makes it possible to process emotions with different content and degrees of intensity. Different emotional skills constitute the conditions of emotional intelligence as the social situations and problems are mostly connected to some sort of emotional information. Emotions play an important part in the workplace as well as in other fields of life, but in the case of helping jobs such as education, or healthcare it seems to appear much stronger emotions and the expectations of the society do emphasize the intensive emotions. It should be mentioned, however, that these expectations might have shortcomings beside the advantages, like suppressing or altering emotions might lead to emotional exhaustion or
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

The origin of the Concept of EI dates back to Darwin's work on the importance of emotional expression to survival and successful adaptation. R. K. Thorndike( 1920), used the term social intelligence to describe the skill of understanding and managing other people. Howard Gardner (1983), introduced the idea of multiple intelligence which included both interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. Payne(1985), wrote a doctoral dissertation which included the term EI. This seems to be the first academic use of the term "emotional intelligence". Mayer and Salovey (1990), were trying to develop a way of scientifically measuring the difference between people's ability in the area of emotions. As a result of the growing acknowledgment by professionals of the importance and relevance of emotions to work outcomes, the research on the topic continued to gain wide popularity. Goleman(1995) in his book discussed about “ True emotional Intelligence".
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENT TEACHERS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENT TEACHERS

Need for the study : Teaching is measured to be one of the stressful occupations, especially because it involves daily work based on social interactions. The teacher must make great endeavor to control not only his own emotions and also emotions of students, parents, administrators and colleagues. It is evident that the capability of student teachers to perform the work not only depends on their teaching skills, and intellectual capability (IQ) but also emotional intelligence (EI).So the researcher wants to test the emotional intelligence of the pupil teachers.
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The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

This idea was supported by the data. Table 3 shows that of the 21 self-other differences, participants rated themselves significantly higher on all but five. The biggest differences were on flexibility, independence and self-regard. Participants gave themselves highest rating for stress tolerance. There are two further interesting features of this part of the study. The first is the exception of the Interpersonal EQi total and subscale scores where there was no difference between self- and other-reports possibly because of the fact that the participants scored themselves below average on this scale. This component and subscale scores indicate social adeptness, the ability to understand others, and to interact and relate well to people. It is interesting but unclear why this sample scored themselves consistently lower on this component and scales, particularly on interpersonal rela- tions. The second is the size of the difference which is, on average, around a third of a standard deviation.
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(2004) Controversies in Emotional Intelligence

(2004) Controversies in Emotional Intelligence

Mayer: I agree they are (if well measured) both truths—but not necessarily truths about emotional intelligence. Overt social behavior is overt social behavior. Is it important? Yes. Is it important for key social outcomes such as leadership or a person’s well-being? Absolutely. Such social behavior is, first and foremost, however, social behavior. To the degree that it relates to internal mental processes, it is (so far as I see it) most correlated with key socioemotional and features of the social actor such as warmth, tact, extroversion, and many other qualities. Indeed, emotional intelligence no doubt contributes as well. The empirical research that indicates that those measures are largely uncorrelated with the MSCEIT tells us, however, that the general social intelligence, informed though it may be by emotional intelligence, contains much, much more than emotional intelligence. Much of that social behavior contains socio- emotional styles, such as extroversion, warmth, and non-verbal styles, but styles that are predominantly independent of emotional intelligence -- as I define it -- that is, as a mental ability -- in the aspects that can be judged by, say, peer raters.
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Emotional Intelligence In Effective Management

Emotional Intelligence In Effective Management

For quite some time now almost every one believed in the age old paradigm that IQ is solely responsible for success in life, even though time and again one comes across contra indications that academic excellence does not necessarily follow success in career or social life, leading one to accepts IQ as the sole determinant of success with a pinch of salt.

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Emotional intelligence in nursing students

Emotional intelligence in nursing students

Moreover, it was shown that there was no correlation between the emotional intelligence and gender, age, and interest in nursing. Namdar, (16) in their study on the nursing students in the University of Tabriz found similar results. In that survey, there was just a meaningful correlation between the emotional intelligence and economic and social satisfaction. But in the survey conducted by Samari and Tahmasbi (12), there was a meaningful correlation between the emotional intelligence and the academic achievement. It was not so for gender or any other trait. It seems that more surveys with larger samples are needed in order to investigate the correlation between the emotional intelligence and personal and social traits. Of course, it was found in this survey that there was a statistically significant negative correlation between the components of public mood and age (p=0.005). The components of public mood include happiness and optimism for which those who were younger scored higher. Some students did not answer some of the items of the questionnaire, due to our study limitations.
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