Page No , ,10 11,

44 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

Crops and markets

First quarter

2006

Volume 87

No 927

Issued by the Directorate Agricultural Statistics

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

(2)

C

CO

ON

NT

TE

EN

NT

TS

S

SECTION A

Economic indicators and trends

1.

Crop forecasts

2.

Economic indicators of the South African agricultural sector

3.

Economic Overview

4.

Indices of producer prices of agricultural products

5.

Consumer price index for food

6.

Price indices of farming requisites

7.

Rooibos tea

8.

Agricultural imports and exports

SECTION B

Fresh produce markets overview

Interesting fruit: Persimmon

Fresh market statistics and graphical presentations

Mass, value and average price of vegetables sold on the twenty major fresh produce markets

Mass, value and average price of fruit sold on the twenty major fresh produce markets

1.

Apples

2.

Pears

3.

Oranges

4.

Lemons

5.

Avocados

6.

Bananas

7.

Papayas

8.

Pineapples

9.

Potatoes

10.

Sweet potatoes

11.

Onions

12.

Tomatoes

13.

Carrots

14.

Cabbages

15.

Cauliflower

16.

Lettuce

17.

Green beans

18.

Pumpkins

19.

Gem squashes

20.

Hubbard squashes

21.

Butternut squashes

22.

Peppers

23.

English cucumbers

Page No.

1-3

4

5, 6

7

8

9,10

11,12

13-15

16

17

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

(3)

SECTION A

ECONOMIC INDICATORS AND TRENDS

1. CROP FORECASTS

Area planted and

fourth production forecast for summer crops for the 2005/06 production season

Maize production in South Africa is set to decline considerably this season owing to a marked reduction in area

planted, coupled with a delayed start of the 2005/06 season across many parts of the country, including the maize

triangle. Despite the poor start, however, good rainfall has been received countrywide since the second half of

December and crop growing conditions have been favourable, although excessive rains occurred in parts of the

country, which led to water logging and nutrient leaching (yellowness and drowning of crops). Available soil

moisture is adequate up to harvest time. The Crop Estimates Committee (CEC) released the estimate of the areas

planted and the fourth production forecast for summer crops on 23 May 2006. The estimated area that South African

commercial maize producers planted to maize during the current (2005/06) season is 1,566 million ha. This is 44 %

down from the 2,810 million ha planted the previous season.

The expected commercial maize crop is 6,003 million tons, which is 47,6 % less than the 11,450 million tons of the

2004/05 season.

The ratio of white to yellow maize plantings is 63:37

,

as against 60:40 the previous season. The estimated white

maize plantings are 985 000 ha, down 42,1 % from the previous season’s plantings of 1,7 million ha, while the

yellow maize plantings are estimated to be 580 700 ha, down 47,7 % from 1,110 million ha for 2004/05.

The majority of South Africa's maize is planted in the Free State, Mpumalanga and North West provinces. Plantings

in Mpumalanga are an estimated 341 000 ha

a decrease of 39,1 % compared to 560 000 ha planted in 2004/05. The

plantings of maize in the Free State decreased by an estimated 48,3 %, from 1,045 million ha to 540 000 ha, and in

North West by 45,0 %, from 895 000 ha to 492 000 ha.

The production forecast for white maize is 3,616 million tons, which is 44,7 % less than the 6,541 million tons of last

season. The expected yield for white maize is 3,67 t/ha, as against 3,85 t/ha the previous season. In the case of yellow

maize, the production forecast is 2,387 million tons, which is 51,4 % less than the 4,909 million tons last season. The

yield for yellow maize is 4,11 t/ha, as against 4,42 t/ha the previous season.

A

sunflower seed

crop of 556 970 tons is expected, which is 10,2 % less than the 620 000 tons of the previous

season. The area planted to sunflower seed is estimated at 472 480 ha, which is 2,7 % more than the 460 000 ha

planted last season. The expected yield is 1,18 t/ha, as against 1,35 t/ha the previous season.

The production forecast for

sorghum

is 79 821 tons

69,3 % lower than the 260 000 tons the previous season. The

area planted to sorghum is estimated to be 33 520 ha, which is 61,3 % or 52 980 ha less than the 86 500 ha planted

last season. The expected yield is 2,38 t/ha, as against 3,01 t/ha the previous season.

The expected

groundnut

crop is 76 025 tons, which is 18,8 % higher than the 64 000 tons of last season. The area

planted to groundnuts is an estimated 48 550 ha, which is 21,4 % or 8 550 ha more than the 40 000 ha planted last

season. The expected yield is 1,57 t/ha, as against 1,60 t/ha last season.

The production forecast for

soya-beans

is 390 245 tons, which is 43,2 % more than the 272 500 tons the previous

season. The estimated area planted to soya-beans is 239 570 ha, which is 59,7 % or 89 570 ha more than the 150 000

ha planted last season. The expected yield is 1,63 t/ha, as against 1,82 t/ha last season.

The production of

dry beans

is expected to be 69 335 tons

0,7 % less than the 69 820 tons the previous season.

The estimated area planted is 54 880 ha, or 11,3 % more than the 49 300 ha planted last season. The expected yield is

1,26 t/ha, as against 1,42 t/ha for 2004/05.

(4)

Area estimate and fourth production forecast of summer crops: 2005/06 production season

Area planted

2005/06

Fourth forecast

2005/06

Area planted

2004/05

Final crop

2004/05

Change - Tons

2005/06 vs

2004/05

Crop

Ha

Tons

Ha

Tons

%

White maize

Yellow maize

Total maize

Sorghum

Groundnuts

Sunflower seed

Soya-beans

Dry beans

985 000

580 700

1 565 700

33 520

48 550

472 480

239 570

54 880

3 615 650

2 387 275

6 002 925

79 821

76 025

556 970

390 245

69 335

1 700 000

1 110 000

2 810 000

86 500

40 000

460 000

150 000

49 300

6 540 700

4 909 300

11 450 000

260 000

64 000

620 000

272 500

69 820

-44,7

-51,4

-47,6

-69,3

+18,8

-10,2

+43,2

-0,7

Forecasts and estimates exclude subsistence agriculture.

The following map indicates the distribution of the production of maize (2005/06) in South Africa:

Northern Cape 2,3 % Limpopo 1,1 % Mpumalanga 21,8 % Free State 34,5 % North West 31,4 % KwaZulu-Natal 3,8 % Western Cape 0,2 % Eastern Cape 0,8 % Gauteng 4,1 %

Revised intention to plant winter crops for the 2006 production season

The CEC released the revised intention to plant winter crops for the 2006 production season on 23 May 2006. The

producers indicated that they intended to plant 793 500 ha of wheat. This is 11 500 ha (1,4 %) less than in 2005. The

main producing areas are within the Free State with 375 000 ha (47,3 %)—1,3 % down on the previous season,

followed by the Western Cape with 294 500 ha (37,1 %)—2,5 % down compared to the previous season.

(5)

The producers indicated that the decrease in the expected planting of wheat could mainly be ascribed to the current

lower wheat prices. Various factors can, however, still influence these intentions up to planting time.

The expected area to be planted to malting barley shows an increase of 2 700 ha (3,0 %), from 90 000 to 92 700 ha

compared to the previous season. The intention to plant canola is expected to decrease by 9,0 % to 36 600 ha, and

the area planted to sweet lupines is expected to increase by 9,9 % to 15 500 ha.

Revised intention to plant winter crops for the 2006 production season

Area planted

2005

First intentions

2006

as at the end of

February 2006

Revised intentions

2006

as at the end of

April 2006

Change

2006 vs 2005

Crop

Ha

Ha

Ha

%

Wheat

Malting barley

Canola

Sweet lupines

805 000

90 000

40 200

14 100

820 900

93 600

33 900

15 200

793 500

92 700

36 600

15 500

-1,4

+3,0

-9,0

+9,9

The percentage distribution of the area planted to wheat according to

the intentions to plant - 2006 production season in South Africa

W. Cape 37 % N Cape 6 % Free State 48 % Rest 6 % North West 3 %

(6)

2.

ECONOMIC INDICATORS OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

Indicator (at current prices)

April ’04 to March ’05

April ’05 to March ’06

% Change

Total gross farm income (R’million)

70 022

68 515

-2,2

Intermediate expenditure (R’million)

39 796

41 958

5,4

Total farm cost (R’million)

56 837

59 687

5,0

Net farm income (R’million)

15 497

11 114

-28,3

Domestic terms of trade (2000 = 1)

0,95

0,91

-4,0

Gross income from major products at current prices

Field crops (R’million)

April ’04 to March ’05

April ’05 to March ’06

% Change

Maize

7 876

7 482

-5,0

Wheat

1 814

1 940

6,9

Sugar cane

2 460

3 134

27

Sunflower seed

1 142

1 022

-10,5

Tobacco

351

204

-41,9

All field crops

16 375

15 563

-5,0

Horticulture (R’million)

April ’04 to March ’05

April ’05 to March ’06

% Change

Vegetables (including potatoes)

6 496

7 069

8,8

Deciduous and other fruit

6 608

4 779

-27,7

Citrus fruit

3 733

2 575

-31,0

Viticulture

2 626

2 415

-8,0

Subtropical fruit

1 354

1 527

12,8

All horticultural products

21 978

19 619

-10,7

Animal products (R’million)

April ’04 to March ’05

April ’05 to March ’06

% Change

Poultry meat

10 453

11 041

5,6

Cattle and calves slaughtered

7 126

8 303

16,5

Milk

5 131

4 709

-8,2

Eggs

3 249

3 303

1,7

Sheep slaughtered

1 688

1 825

8,1

(7)

3. ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

This article gives an overview of the major macroeconomic trends in the agricultural sector for the period 1 April 2005 to

31 March 2006. Aggregates are compared with the period 1 April 2004 to 31 March 2005.

Gross farming income

Gross farming income refers to both that part of agricultural production that is marketed and production for own

consumption, valued at basic prices.

Gross income from all agricultural products amounted to R68 515 million for the year ended 31 March 2006, which

is 2,2 % lower than the previous year. This decrease can mainly be attributed to a decrease of 10,7 % in the gross

income from horticulture.

The gross income from field crops decreased by R812 million and amounted to R15 563 million. The income from

maize decreased by 5,0 % and that from tobacco decreased by 42,9 %. Income from sugar cane increased by 27 %.

The income from horticultural products decreased by 10,7 % to R19 619 as the result of a decrease of 27,7% in the

income from deciduous fruit and a 31% decrease from citrus. The decrease in income from deciduous fruit is

attributed to a decrease in production and the decrease in the income from citrus is the result of a 13 % decrease in

prices received.

Income from animal products showed an increase of 5,3 %, from R31 670 million to R33 334 million. This increase

is mainly the result of an increase in the income from animals slaughtered.

Gross farming income (GFI)

2004/05-2005/06 (April to March)

5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 2004/05 2005/06 Year R'm illion

Field crops Horticulture Animal products

Expenditure on intermediate production inputs

Expenditure on intermediate production inputs refers to the value of the goods and services that were purchased to

be consumed as inputs during the production process.

Expenditure on intermediate goods and services increased by 5,4 % to R41 944 million for the year ended 31 March

2006. Expenditure on farm feeds remained the biggest expenditure item, accounting for 28,4 % of total expenditure,

followed by 12,0 % for fuel, 11,6 % for farm services and 10,5 % for maintenance of machinery and implements.

Large increases occurred in expenditure on fuel, which increased by 27,2 %, farm services by 13,5 and farm feeds

by 10,5 %. These increases are mainly the result of price increases of 3,4 % for fuel and 8,3 % for fertilisers.

Prices received and prices paid by farmers as well as terms of trade

On average, prices received by farmers for their products decreased by 2,2 %. The weighted average price of field

crops decreased by 15,3 %, mainly because of decreases in the prices of cotton (30,8 %), summer grains (28,0 %),

winter grains (14,4 %) and oil seeds (14,1 %). Prices of horticultural products increased by 3,6 %. Prices of

vegetables increased by 9,8 %, while prices of fruit showed a slight increase of 1,0 %. The average price of pastoral

products increased by 17,5 %, while prices received for animals slaughtered for red meat increased by 8,1 % and

prices for poultry increased by 2,8 %. However, the price of milk decreased by 1,6 %.

The prices paid for farming requisites, including machinery and implements, material for fixed improvements as

well as intermediate goods and services, increased by 1,9 %, compared to 4,2 % for the previous period. Prices for

fuel showed an increase of 3,4 % while prices paid by farmers for fertilisers increased by 8,3 %.

(8)

Prices paid and received by farmers

2003/04-2005/06 (April to March)

115 125 135 145 155 165 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2000 = 100

Prices paid for production inputs Prices received for field crops Prices received for horticultural products Prices received for animal products

Net farm income and cash flow

A decrease of 2,2 % in gross farm income against an increase of 5,4 % in expenditure on intermediate production

inputs resulted in a decrease in farming profit by 28,3 % to R11 114 million. Interest payments decreased slightly

because of favourable interest rates. Labour and rent payments increased by approximately 4 and 7 %, respectively,

despite the shedding of jobs within the sector.

Conclusion

The gross income of farmers for the period April 2004-March 2005 to April 2005-March 2006 decreased by 2,2 %,

as a result of lower income from both field crops and horticultural products, while income from animal products

showed a moderate increase of 5,3 %. The lower income can mainly be attributed to the continuing downward trend

in prices that farmers received for their products, especially field crops. In addition to this, farming expenses showed

a bigger increase than during the previous period. This is because the prices of some of the important inputs, such as

fuel, fertilisers and farm feeds, showed increases. The drop in the net income of farmers will have an adverse impact

on the cash flow of farmers.

(9)

4. INDICES OF PRODUCER PRICES OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS

February

March

2005

2006

2005

2006

Product

Weight

2000 = 100

Field crops

Horticulture

Animal husbandry

Combined

Field crops

Summer grains

Winter cereals

Oilseeds

Sugar cane

Hay

Dry beans

Cotton

Tobacco

Combined

Horticulture

Viticulture

Vegetables

Fruit

Combined

Animal husbandry

Pastoral products

Stock slaughtered

Dairy

Poultry

Combined

34

23

43

100

42

19

6

16

11

2

1

3

100

15

43

42

100

4

31

17

48

100

130,6

145,9

143,7

140,3

140,0

112,6

135,4

124,4

141,3

123,9

140,4

120,2

130,6

157,9

116,9

165,4

145,9

122,2

157,7

145,6

134,8

143,7

122,9

160,4

156,8

147,5

106,4

104,1

139,6

135,4

163,0

124,5

97,1

116,6

122,9

157,9

122,4

191,2

160,4

160,2

180,5

145,6

144,3

156,8

130,6

149,7

145,4

142,0

140,0

112,6

135,4

124,4

141,3

123,9

140,4

120,2

130,6

157,9

119,8

171,1

149,7

120,9

158,7

148,0

137,1

145,4

122,9

160,0

159,9

148,8

106,4

104,1

139,6

135,4

163,0

124,5

97,1

116,6

122,9

157,9

136,2

179,6

160,0

170,3

188,8

145,6

144,5

159,9

Producer price index for vegetables, fruit and stock slaughtered

100 120 140 160 180 200

Mar. '05 May '05 Jul. '05 Sep. '05 Nov. '05 Jan.'06 Mar.'06 Month

2000 =

100

(10)

5. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR FOOD

January 2006

February 2006

March 2006

Item

Weight

2000 = 100

All items

All items, excluding food

Food

Grain products

Meat

Fish and other seafood

Milk, cheese and eggs

Fats and oils

Fruit and nuts

Vegetables

Sugar

Coffee, tea and cocoa

Other

100,00

79,01

20,99

3,81

5,66

0,69

1,96

0,76

1,09

2,00

0,50

1,07

3,45

130,4

127,4

143,1

132,1

153,9

142,3

153,7

131,8

146,3

137,6

134,4

124,4

141,9

130,5

127,5

143,7

133,2

154,4

145,6

153,7

132,6

148,1

136,4

138,3

124,2

141,9

131,5

128,0

144,6

133,7

155,6

145,8

153,3

132,8

151,9

140,0

139,1

124,4

141,9

(11)

6. PRICE INDICES OF FARMING REQUISITES (BASE YEAR: 2000 = 100)

Machinery and implements

Material for fixed improvements

Period

Tractors

Lorries Implements

Irrigation

equipment

Combined

index

Building

materials

Fencing

materials

Combined

index

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

January

April

2003/04

July

October

2005

January

April

2004/05

July

October

2006

January

100,0

129,7

191,3

208,0

201,2

206,2

206,2

206,5

206,8

191,9

191,6

191,6

192,3

193,9

191,8

191,6

191,6

100,0

116,9

137,9

141,1

141,9

141,2

141,9

140,1

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

142,4

100,0

109,4

130,3

139,6

140,1

140,0

140,0

140,1

140,2

140,2

139,7

139,7

139,8

140,0

139,6

139,9

139,7

100,0

107,2

129,9

143,1

143,7

143,4

143,4

144,3

144,0

143,8

139,4

144,6

147,0

144,0

149,2

144,8

144,6

100,0

117,4

150,8

161,0

159,4

160,6

160,8

160,8

159,4

156,8

156,0

156,6

157,1

157,3

157,2

156,7

156,6

100,0

106,7

119,7

132,4

139,5

134,2

137,6

134,9

142,7

143,6

150,4

147,0

149,0

145,6

154,5

151,3

149,5

100,0

115,9

133,0

158,8

169,0

159,8

164,2

161,3

174,7

177,4

194,8

189,3

192,8

182,6

194,3

202,1

189,3

100,0

110,3

125,0

142,9

151,3

144,5

148,2

145,5

155,5

157,1

168,2

163,9

166,5

160,4

170,8

171,6

165,5

Intermediate goods and services

Period

Fertilisers

Fuel

Stock feed

Dips and

sprays

Packing

materials

Maintenance

and repairs

Combined

index

All

farming

requisites

combined

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

January

April

2003/04

July

October

2005

January

April

2004/05

July

October

2006

January

100,0

124,7

149,5

145,6

146,1

142,8

148,3

144,2

144,5

148,0

158,5

153,3

158,3

151,0

166,2

156,3

162,6

100,0

115,4

123,1

122,9

133,4

115,8

129,2

118,0

136,5

152,1

141,0

138,5

138,7

141,5

143,3

143,7

149,4

100,0

113,4

153,0

160,5

162,8

161,2

162,3

161,5

165,1

162,6

160,2

160,6

162,5

164,2

160,5

152,7

161,6

100,0

106,8

122,3

119,7

115,0

114,1

114,5

115,6

116,5

114,7

114,9

114,4

114,5

115,1

115,1

115,7

117,0

100,0

111,7

114,0

116,3

120,0

118,8

120,7

118,3

120,7

120,0

120,4

119,5

120,2

120,1

121,3

120,4

121,6

100,0

107,6

124,1

143,2

150,0

149,7

148,9

148,0

152,0

150,4

156,9

153,3

154,0

152,0

156,0

160,6

163,8

100,0

114,1

136,0

143,2

148,0

144,1

147,0

144,5

149,8

151,1

151,3

149,8

151,1

150,9

153,1

149,8

155,5

100,0

114,1

136,6

145,0

149,4

145,8

148,5

146,2

151,2

152,3

153,1

151,6

153,0

152,3

154,9

152,3

156,4

(12)

Price indices of farming requisites

140 150 160 170 180

Jan. '04 Apr. '04 Jul. '04 Oct. '04 Jan. '05 Apr. '05 Jul. '05 Oct. '05 Jan. '06 Quarter

20

00 =

1

00

Machinery and implements Material for fixed improvements Intermediate goods

(13)

7. ROOIBOS TEA

Introduction

South Africa’s Western Cape is home to a vast number of plant species, which thrive only in micro climate, of which the

beautiful Cedarberg mountain area is one. It is only here that rooibos grows in its natural state, in an area of

Mediterranean rainfall and coarse sandy soil.

Before it became a commercial enterprise, the development, production and consumption of rooibos tea was carried out

by the local inhabitants of the Western Cape. They began harvesting the wild plants by cutting these during the summer

months. The plants were then chopped with axes, bruised with wooden hammers, fermented in heaps and finally dried.

The same basic method is still used today, although it is now mechanised and refined.

Production and production areas

Rooibos is grown only in a small area 250 km north of Cape Town in the Cedarberg area and no alternative source of

supply of this unique product is available anywhere in the world.

The rooibos plant has adapted well to the harsh conditions of the Cedarberg region, where temperatures drop to zero

degrees Centigrade during the winter months and rise to a blistering 48 degrees Centigrade at the height of summer. The

winter rains vary between as little as 180 mm and 500 mm for the year. No irrigation is used and the rooibos plant is

often subjected to severe drought conditions. The survival mechanism of this hardy bush is its tap root that digs down 3

metres or more into the well-drained, cool, sandy soil that has a high acidity level. A farmer can expect his first crop

after two years and the bush will be in full production in its third year. Approximately 10 000 tea bushes can be

established per hectare.

There are more than 300 commercial rooibos producers, the majority of which are shareholders and contract suppliers of

Rooibos Limited, located in and around the Clanwilliam area in the Western Cape. There are also fewer than 200

small-scale rooibos farmers farming in Wupperthal in the Cedarberg mountain area in the Western Cape and the Suid

Bokkeveld area south of Nieuwoudtville in the Northern Cape. Both communities are involved in the primary

production of rooibos tea as their farming activity, supplemented by limited sheep, goat and vegetable farming.

Together, they produce less than 2 % of the total rooibos industry production.

Production statistics

On average, rooibos tea production increased by 1,3 % per annum from 2001/02 to 2005/06. Production for 2005/06 is

estimated at 9 million kilogrammes. The total gross value of rooibos tea has been increasing moderately over the past

four years, with an average increase of 4,2 % per annum from 2001/02 to 2005/06.

The following graph shows the total production and the gross value of rooibos tea over the past five years:

Production and gross value of rooibos tea 2001/02–2005/06 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 Year '0 00 kg 20 000 40 000 60 000 80 000 100 000 120 000 140 000 Gro ss v alu e R '000

(14)

Producer prices

The producer prices of rooibos tea from 2001/02 to 2005/06 compare as follows:

Year

2001/02 2002/03 2003/04

c/kg

2004/05 2005/06*

Producer price

1 150

1 150

1 600

1 400

1 200

* Preliminary

Unique properties of rooibos tea

Rooibos tea is a popular drink owing to its health properties. It is rich in essential minerals and contains a low

percentage of tannin and no caffeine. It can serve as an ingredient in cosmetics to help prevent the ravages of skin

associated with age, as an ingredient in slimming products, as a cure for colic in babies, for insomnia and for allergies.

Because of these properties, the tea is sold in many countries as a health beverage.

Rooibos tea is popular with sophisticated and health-conscious markets as a stand-alone tea, as well as blended with

other herbal teas and fruit juices. The European market, mainly Germany and The Netherlands, accounts for the highest

export volumes, followed by Japan, the UK and Malaysia.

Compiled by: Mokatane Abel Ramokoma

Source: Rooibos Limited

(15)

8.

AGRICULTURAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

South Africa has a dual agricultural economy, with both well-developed commercial farming and predominantly

subsistence-based production in the deep rural areas. Primary commercial agriculture contributes about 3 % to the Gross

Domestic Product and for the past five years has contributed on average 8 % of South African total exports.

Export and import values of agricultural products (f.o.b.)

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005*

Year

R’million

Exports

Total: South Africa

Total: agricultural

Agriculture as % of

total exports

245 448

20 075

8,2

314 927

25 460

8,1

273 127

22 794

8,3

292 079

22 074

7,6

327 125

25 458

7,8

Imports

Total s.a

Total agricultural

Agriculture as % of

total imports

217 116

10 704

4,9

273 702

14 939

5,5

256 978

13 842

5,4

304 746

16 341

5,4

349 164

16 270

4,7

*

Summary of monthly data from January to December 2005 to obtain an annual preliminary figure for 2005.

Exchange of goods and services exists between regions because different regions have a comparable advantage in the

production of some tradable commodity or because the size of different regions allows for the benefit of mass

production of a particular commodity.

The biodiversity of the South African weather conditions, from Mediterranean to subtropical to semidesert, favours the

cultivation of a highly diverse range of agricultural products, ranging from deciduous, citrus and subtropical fruit to

grain, wool, cut flowers, bush tea, livestock and game. The deregulation and liberalisation of the South African

agricultural sector has brought with it many challenges, some of which include competitiveness and assessment of the

global market. The most important factor limiting agricultural production is the availability of water; rainfall is

distributed unevenly across the country.

10-year overview: 1996 to 2005*

Agricultural exports showed on average an annual growth rate of 11 % from 1996 to 2005, which is an impressive

performance given the challenges and obstacles that the export market is facing. These challenges include subsidisation

of farmers by rich countries and, locally, unfavourable weather conditions and a relatively small area of arable land.

Only about 13 % of South Africa’s surface area can be used for crop production.

South Africa is self-sufficient in most primary foods, with the exception of wheat, rice and oilseeds. However, imports

show an average growth rate of 9 % per annum.

(16)

Imports and exports of agricultural products

1996 to 2005*

0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005* Year R 'm illion Imports Exports

*

Summarised monthly data from January to December 2005 to obtain an annual preliminary figure for 2005.

South African exports have acceded imports for the past ten years, and exports to almost all countries have increased

significantly with the exception of Brazilian exports, which decreased annually on average by 18 %, while imports

showed an annual increase of 36 % from 1996 to 2005. Exports to the European Region show an average annual growth

of 12 %. The United Kingdom was South Africa’s main export destination with exports to the value of R1,3 billion in

1996. In 2005 it was still the main destination, with an export value of R3,4 billion. Japan was second in 1996 with an

export value of R1,09 billion, and ranked number four in 2005, with an export value of R1,4 billion. The Netherlands

ranked second in 2005, with an export value of 2,8 billion.

Wine exports showed an annual increase of 25 %. In 1996, wine ranked third, with exports to the value of R798 million.

Wine was the main export product in 2005, with exports reaching R3,8 million, which contributes 15 % to total

agricultural exports. Wine exports to the European Region amounted to R2,9 million. Rice and wheat imports show an

average annual increase of 10 and 8 %, respectively and ranked first and second in 1996 and 2005. The highest imports

of wheat were in 2004, when South Africa imported wheat to the value of R1,3 billion.

South African exports to regions in 2005*

NAFTA

7 % Middle East

7 % West Africa

3 % East Asia and Pacific

15 %

SADC 17 %

Rest of the world 10 % European Countries

41 %

*

Summarised monthly data from January 2005 to December 2005 to obtain an annual preliminary figure for 2005.

SADC - Southern African Development Community

NAFTA - North American Free Trade Agreement

In 1996, agricultural imports totalled R7,8 billion and the major suppliers were the United States, with imports to the

value of R1,3 billion, Argentina with R845 million, United Kingdom with R660 million, Australia R655 million and

Zimbabwe with R495 million.

(17)

South Africa’s 2005* total agricultural imports amounted to R16,2 billion. The leading suppliers were Brazil (R2,06

billion), Argentina (R2 billion), the United States (R1,3 billion), Thailand (R1,09 billion) and United Kingdom with

R1,05 billion. Rice and wheat are still the most imported products

in 2005* these amounted to R2,6 billion.

Trade of major agricultural products for the calendar year 2005

Trade of agricultural products between South Africa and the rest of the world in 2005*

South Africa’s major imports

January to December 2005

South Africa’s major exports

January to December 2005

Products R’million Products R’million

Rice

R1 465 Wine of fresh grapes

R3 808

Wheat and meslin

R1 152 Citrus fruit

R3 178

Undenatured ethyl alcohol

R1 141 Grapes, fresh or dried

R2 010

Poultry meat

R939 Sugar cane/ beet

R1 770

Oilcake R756

Maize (corn)

R1 666

Soya-bean oil

R702 Apples, pears and quinces

R1 532

Palm oil

R664

Fruit, nuts and other edible parts of

plants

R1 134

Food preparations not elsewhere

specified or included

R614 Fruit

juices

R823

Unmanufactured tobacco

R492 Cereal groats, meal and pellets

R680

Cotton

R424 Undenatured ethyl alcohol

R647

Total imports

R16 270 Total exports

R25 458

*

Summarised monthly data from January 2005 to December 2005 to obtain an annual preliminary figure for 2005.

South African agriculture and agribusiness have a number of competitive advantages, such as holding their ground on

the world market, especially through exports of products such as wine, fruit (including citrus fruit) and sugar, therefore

making the country an important trading partner.

Compiled By: Pheladi Mashao

Sources:

www.Wikipedia.org

www.Southafrica.info

SARS: Customs and Excise

(18)

SECTION B

FRESH PRODUCE MARKETS OVERVIEW

INTERESTING FRUIT: PERSIMMON

The word persimmon comes from an Algonquin language of the eastern United States, meaning “a dry fruit”.

Origin

: The oriental persimmon is native to China, where it has been cultivated for centuries and more than two

thousand different cultivars exist. It spread to Korea and Japan many years ago, where additional cultivars were

developed. The plant was introduced to California in the mid-1800s.

Description

: The persimmon is a multitrunked or single-stemmed deciduous tree, up to 7,5 metres tall and at least as

wide. It is an attractive ornamental with drooping leaves and branches that give it a languid, rather tropical appearance.

The branches are moderately brittle and can be damaged in high winds.

Climate

: Persimmons do best in areas that have mild winters and relatively mild summers. It can tolerate temperatures

of -18

o

C when fully dormant. However, because of its low chilling requirements (less than 100 hours), it may break

dormancy during early warm spells only to be damaged by the following spring frosts. The leaves die off at -3

o

C when

growing. Trees do not produce well in the high summer heat of desert regions, which may also result in sunburn damage

to the bark.

Fruit:

Persimmons can be classified into two general categories: those that bear astringent fruit until they are soft/ripe

and those that bear nonastringent fruit. A nonastringent persimmon can be eaten like an apple when it is crisp. These

cultivars require hot summers, and the fruit may retain some astringency when grown in cooler regions.

Pollination-constent nonastingent persimmons are always edible when still firm; pollination variant nonastringent fruit is edible

when firm only if they have been pollinated. The shape of the fruit varies according to cultivar, from spherical to acron

to flattened or squarish, and vary from 2 to 8 cm in diameter according to species. The colour of the fruit varies from

light yellow-orange to dark orange-red. The mass can be up to approximately 500 grammes. The entire fruit is edible,

except for the seed calyx. Alternate bearing is frequent. This can be partially overcome by thinning the fruit or

moderately pruning after a light-crop year. Unharvested fruit remaining on the tree after leaf fall creates a very

decorative effect. Many immature fruit drop from May to September.

.

Food uses:

The persimmon fruit is eaten fresh, dried, cooked and canned. The persimmon is high in glucose and protein,

and also has various medicinal and chemical uses. In Korean culture, a punch called sujeonggwa is made from dried

persimmons. In some Chinese cultures, dried persimmon leaves are used for tea. At the annual Persimmon Festival

during September a persimmon pudding contest is held. It is a baked pudding that has the consistency of pumpkin pie

but resembles a brownie and is almost always served with a topping of whipped cream. Persimmons are used to cook

jam and chutney. Soft-ripe persimmons are peeled and cut into sections, pressed through a sieve to make a purée, packed

into containers, sealed and frozen.

Sources:

(19)

FRESH MARKET STATISTICS AND GRAPHIC PRESENTATION OF SEASONAL FLUCTUATIONS IN

QUANTITIES AND PRICES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLES SOLD ON THE MAJOR FRESH PRODUCE

MARKETS

The purpose of this overview is to show the short–term price and volume trends (seasonal fluctuations) of various types

of fruit and vegetables sold on the major fresh produce markets and to enable the making of comparisons between

markets.

Market prices are determined by the interaction between supply and demand, both of which are influenced by various

factors. Supply factors include climate, seasonal production, perishability of products and the reaction of producers to

prices realised in preceding periods, etc. Demand factors include consumer preferences, substitution between products

and

per capita income. Therefore the seasonal pattern of quantities sold and prices realised may differ appreciably on

different markets.

The graphs in this overview depict the trends for fruit and vegetables sold on the Bloemfontein Fresh Produce Market

and give an indication of the variations in monthly volumes sold and prices received, based on the average for the 5 year

period 2001 to 2005.

Detailed information regarding the specific varieties of fruit and vegetables sold on the markets are available on request

from Ms L Lezar, Directorate Agricultural Statistics, tel. (012) 319 8051, fax (012) 319 8031, or e-mail:

LindieL@nda.agric.za

Mass, value and average price of vegetables sold on the twenty major fresh produce markets: January to March

2006

Code Market

Rands

Tons

Rands/ton

JHB

Johannesburg

313 563 776

155 735

2 013,44

TSW

Tshwane (Pretoria)

145 497 123

78 094

1 863,11

CT

Cape Town

105 820 735

58 314

1 814,68

DBN

Durban

83 204 921

45 639

1 823,11

SPR

Springs

35 974 126

22 934

1 568,57

PE

Port Elizabeth

30 153 032

17 528

1 720,23

PMB

Pietermaritzburg

27 005 095

15 996

1 688,26

KDP

Klerksdorp

25 183 216

16 524

1 524,04

EL

East London

22 959 691

14 030

1 636,47

BFN

Bloemfontein

22 534 646

13 363

1 686,38

VER

Vereeniging

17 141 630

12 017

1 426,44

WLK

Welkom

17 128 870

10 735

1 595,65

MPL

Mpumalanga

12 594 448

7 072

1 780,92

KIM

Kimberley

8 907 471

5 626

1 583,37

UIT

Uitenhage

6 684 863

4 108

1 627,38

POL

Polokwane (Pietersburg)

3 942 115

2 197

1 794,19

WBK

Witbank

3 902 077

2 377

1 641,21

GEO

George

2 950 129

1 602

1 841,58

KEI

Kei (Umtata)

2 373 447

1 398

1 697,13

(20)

Mass, value and average price of fruit sold on the twenty major fresh produce markets: January to March 2006

Code Market

Rands

Tons

Rands/ton

JHB

Johannesburg

202 888 447

57 136

3 550,94

TSW

Tshwane (Pretoria)

108 175 224

35 220

3 071,43

CT

Cape Town

68 524 538

26 917

2 545,79

DBN

Durban

64 999 296

20 920

3 107,05

PMB

Pietermaritzburg

26 342 032

8 764

3 005,66

SPR

Springs

23 420 778

8 334

2 810,32

BFM

Bloemfontein

20 943 878

7 725

2 711,18

EL

East London

20 314 573

6 912

2 939,06

KDP

Klerksdorp

14 588 460

6 843

2 131,84

PE

Port Elizabeth

13 261 356

4 756

2 788,21

WLK

Welkom

8 272 424

3 086

2 680,38

VER

Vereeniging

5 350 611

2 265

2 362,40

KIM

Kimberley

4 409 071

1 934

2 280,19

KEI

Kei (Umtata)

3 635 257

1 224

2 969,55

WBK

Witbank

1 965 471

741

2 650,93

MPL

Mpumalanga

960 413

370

2 598,45

UIT

Uitenhage

546 391

484

1 129,71

POL

Polokwane (Pietersburg)

298 713

119

2 517,38

GEO

George

90 053

76

1 191,89

(21)

1. Apples

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 2 262 3 592 630 78 339 35 563 1 347 622 305 520 233 996 10 51 – 2 84 173 – 11 850 1 464 2 471 470 56 194 40 529 836 480 204 368 156 695 6 24 – 1 68 104 – 8 174 966 1 810 336 253 195 15 336 664 365 74 173 97 407 1 5 – 27 21 28 – 5 780 1 852 2 691 359 78 461 20 320 1 424 571 116 294 119 540 7 35 – 28 80 101 4 9 111 2 641 4 235 587 110 607 39 535 2 428 977 278 552 168 981 14 60 14 14 71 194 1 14 517 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/Ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 3 580 3 992 3 477 2 923 3 520 4 639 3 835 3 459 3 377 3 381 2 969 3 537 3 631 1 947 3 078 – 3 170 2 002 2 277 – 3 622 3 824 4 350 3 551 3 267 4 386 4 620 3 888 4 171 3 760 3 531 2 933 3 520 4 001 1 319 2 802 – 3 384 2 121 2 296 7 000 3 940 4 634 5 216 3 846 798 5 424 4 295 4 036 4 317 4 448 3 990 3 780 4 047 4 003 2 097 3 309 – 1 861 2 451 3 423 – 4 428 3 450 4 015 3 592 3 868 3 660 2 462 3 539 3 450 3 435 3 612 2 857 3 600 3 373 1 209 3 466 – 3 300 2 164 3 072 2 306 3 599 2 900 3 128 2 659 2 903 2 679 2 254 2 575 2 640 2 556 2 816 2 212 3 045 2 709 1 078 3 023 3 792 2 928 3 330 2 113 2 256 2 819 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of apples and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

1 000 1 500 2 000 2 500 3 000 3 500 4 000 4 500 5 000 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month T ons 1 600 1 900 2 200 2 500 2 800 3 100 3 400 R/ton

(22)

2. Pears

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 519 825 125 38 81 14 69 190 86 118 151 50 177 – 2 – – 41 14 – 2 508 213 364 95 25 61 7 9 61 80 90 47 45 78 – 6 – – 1 4 – 1 191 847 1 066 230 40 206 21 192 688 234 112 228 80 244 14 15 – 4 8 71 – 4 308 1 161 1 643 325 64 268 59 287 1 055 402 146 287 128 411 9 26 – – 29 100 1 6 409 1 121 1 496 321 48 264 50 292 790 346 159 308 90 426 9 25 – 6 25 125 – 5 912 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 3 483 3 879 3 694 3 264 3 073 4 613 4 081 3 743 3 504 3 098 2 543 3 414 3 692 – 1 271 – – 1 306 1 933 – 3 542 4 210 3 772 3 942 3 999 2 433 5 446 5 314 4 098 3 984 3 800 3 011 3 447 3 060 – 4 050 – – 2 160 3 046 – 3 765 2 223 2 682 2 425 2 572 1 951 2 122 2 153 2 123 2 522 2 142 1 975 2 492 2 434 1 244 3 468 – 1 665 2 318 2 382 2 530 2 139 2 271 2 080 2 097 1 881 1 630 2 090 2 139 2 259 2 093 1 684 1 817 2 048 1 218 2 943 – – 1 579 2 353 1 077 2 128 2 235 2 424 2 238 2 839 1 757 1 978 1 940 2 339 2 481 2 143 1 760 2 441 2 135 1 278 2 841 – 3 253 2 898 2 091 1 187 2 249 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of pears and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 300 600 900 1 200 1 500 1 800 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month Tons 1 000 1 400 1 800 2 200 2 600 3 000 3 400 3 800 R/t o n Quantity Price

(23)

3. Oranges

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 1 008 2 180 137 45 568 51 81 939 368 41 15 58 316 27 38 – – – – – 5 879 131 887 6 17 386 50 34 435 237 7 8 39 33 22 – – – – – – 2 299 17 84 – 2 271 8 – 92 64 10 2 – 1 3 – – – – – – 559 26 182 – 4 110 – – 6 – – 3 – – – – – 1 – – – 336 623 1 928 92 26 212 3 19 341 102 18 81 11 151 – 11 – – – – – 3 626 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 1 693 1 848 1 469 1 467 1 398 820 1 009 1 598 907 575 3 042 1 490 1 672 729 1 582 – – – – – 1 621 1 884 2 302 1 217 1 648 1 717 911 1 950 1 991 965 1 598 2 700 1 388 1 235 721 – – – – – – 1 892 1 889 3 354 – 2 054 2 458 256 – 1 623 901 714 2 064 – 1 000 512 – – – – – – 2 173 2 001 3 139 – 1 171 3 650 – – 4 943 – – 1 929 – 1 678 – – – 1 321 – – – 3 204 1 527 1 753 1 704 2 234 2 409 1 671 1 867 1 937 1 244 1 863 1 740 1 831 1 304 – 1 547 – 1 596 – – – 1 739 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the pecific market was not available at the time of printing.

s

Sales of oranges and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 1 000 2 000 3 000 4 000 5 000 6 000 7 000 8 000 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month T ons 500 750 1 000 1 250 1 500 1 750 2 000 R/ton

(24)

4. Lemons

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 118 410 20 – 178 13 13 70 14 – 4 – 4 1 – – – – – – 936 120 414 9 – 181 28 9 89 13 – 4 – 3 1 – – – – – – 875 149 373 9 – 171 23 6 67 9 – 5 3 10 1 – – – – – – 834 140 357 6 – 194 19 9 63 5 – 7 – 5 – – – – – – – 809 169 443 21 – 168 19 12 77 9 – 4 – 16 – – – – – – – 944 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 2 853 2 415 2 775 4 285 1 512 946 2 113 2 505 1 620 – 2 469 285 802 889 – – – – – – 2 046 3 185 2 389 2 949 4 282 1 742 1 022 1 929 2 087 1 841 – 2 102 – 3 930 639 – – – – – 1 373 2 288 2 453 2 510 2 577 5 019 1 505 1 219 1 443 2 572 1 931 – 2 596 1 026 2 482 511 – – – – – 1 416 2 239 2 410 2 016 3 967 4 715 1 418 1 057 1 927 2 086 4 180 924 1 105 395 2 055 1 000 – – – 1 950 – 942 1 946 1 830 1 705 2 403 5 945 1 432 1 178 1 199 1 864 2 721 2 000 2 751 – 1 536 1 183 – – – 1 252 – – 1 705 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of lemons and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 20 40 60 80 100 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month T ons 900 1 200 1 500 1 800 2 100 2 400 2 700 3 000 R/ton

(25)

5. Avocados

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 128 543 15 1 324 10 1 6 7 – 2 – 12 – – – 1 – – – 1 053 95 356 14 – 184 7 – 8 6 – 1 – 6 – – – 2 – – – 681 46 177 4 – 84 1 – 3 2 – – – 3 – – – – – – – 324 57 354 2 – 127 6 1 – 1 – 2 – 14 – – – – – – – 568 395 828 38 12 388 21 1 1 5 13 30 8 63 – 2 – – – – – 1 810 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 7 144 6 674 6 105 5 681 8 342 6 650 11 480 4 541 2 694 – 4 860 – 3 030 – 3 402 – 9 556 – – 1 398 7 156 6 291 6 608 7 217 – 8 946 7 935 7 628 6 796 4 490 – 5 844 – 5 321 – 1 250 – 11 386 – – 5 452 7 206 9 352 9 384 993 – 11 376 10 791 1 102 5 610 5 361 – – – 6 358 – – – – – – – 9 672 5 876 6 167 8 717 – 11 348 11 414 5 954 11 626 8 333 – 10 002 – 4 812 – – – – – – – 7 360 3 307 3 406 4 417 4 547 5 662 4 760 6 161 6 066 3 259 4 672 5 474 4 095 2 714 6 715 3 092 – – – – – 3 940 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of avocados and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 70 140 210 280 350 420 490 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month T ons 1 000 1 700 2 400 3 100 3 800 4 500 5 200 R/ton

(26)

6. Bananas

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 4 059 6 944 1 034 149 2 232 878 759 2 022 937 525 603 238 1 154 – 159 – 1 16 – 2 21 718 3 057 5 472 874 116 2 473 831 750 1 893 821 396 556 193 968 – 185 – 27 17 – – 18 636 3 093 5 185 841 112 1 934 843 807 1 938 776 428 572 138 776 – 113 – 7 13 – – 17 584 3 367 5 141 750 106 2 137 739 753 1 735 988 402 575 173 913 – 109 – 7 16 2 – 17 921 3 015 4 839 786 122 2 253 809 805 1 687 842 376 583 216 887 – 164 – 11 12 – – 17 414 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 2 560 2 554 2 720 2 855 3 076 3 250 3 070 2 494 2 377 2 721 2 427 2 576 2 402 – 2 334 – 1 594 1 327 – 3 460 2 642 3 069 2 930 3 358 3 631 3 555 3 703 3 704 2 852 2 692 3 200 2 985 2 905 2 762 – 2 451 – 2 452 1 495 – 7 398 3 099 2 754 2 648 3 059 3 396 3 440 3 545 3 315 2 320 2 288 2 924 2 580 2 932 2 604 – 2 745 – 2 406 1 493 3 120 – 2 804 2 762 2 777 2 907 3 347 3 140 3 329 3 012 2 307 2 113 2 645 2 547 2 913 2 597 – 2 284 – 1 818 1 088 3 163 – 2 754 3 038 3 007 3 172 3 605 3 764 3 581 3 166 2 504 2 596 2 966 2 803 3 119 2 813 – 2 701 – 1 984 1 291 – – 3 066 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of bananas and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

2 000 2 500 3 000 3 500 4 000 4 500 5 000 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month T ons 1 600 1 800 2 000 2 200 2 400 2 600 2 800 R/ton

(27)

7. Papayas

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 280 466 45 7 210 10 1 28 36 8 49 – 10 – – – – – – 5 1 161 143 264 31 1 102 5 2 24 22 – 2 – 3 – – – – – – – 605 120 203 13 – 76 2 – 19 30 – – – 3 – – – – – – – 472 142 258 22 – 83 2 – 11 43 2 6 – 6 – – – – – – – 579 121 234 23 1 110 6 6 15 34 1 5 – 4 – – – – – – – 566 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 4 227 3 954 3 706 2 514 3 613 4 574 6 473 3 985 3 824 2 230 2 576 – 7 193 – – – – – – 1 751 3 893 4 997 5 050 3 996 1 909 3 737 4 068 3 432 3 892 4 226 5 251 5 060 – 7 839 – – – – – – – 4 674 6 150 6 718 3 889 – 4 202 9 576 7 333 3 846 4 191 4 255 5 650 – 12 598 – – – – – – – 5 857 5 133 5 202 3 440 4 000 4 332 7 809 – 4 124 2 988 1 686 4 010 – 5 716 – – – – – – – 4 796 5 394 5 709 4 101 2 619 3 552 5 352 4 779 4 396 3 598 2 317 3 749 – 3 944 – – – – – – 7 750 4 920 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of papayas and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 50 100 150 200 250 300 J F M A M J J A S O N D T ons 1 000 1 500 2 000 2 500 3 000 3 500 4 000 R/ton

(28)

8. Pineapples

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 503 860 70 36 484 39 109 191 44 24 46 8 34 1 – – – 5 – – 2 461 659 952 93 35 647 35 113 289 76 32 67 17 47 – – – – 10 – – 3 081 435 805 67 24 693 21 265 270 62 29 54 6 37 – 2 – – – – – 2 779 276 482 87 32 376 21 155 154 39 17 25 10 20 – – – – – – 10 1 711 311 568 201 33 345 35 126 143 45 19 37 10 25 1 – – – – – 1 1 907 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 3 470 3 491 3 198 2 670 4 240 1 289 1 075 2 752 2 797 4 176 3 438 3 365 2 847 3 709 – – – 3 262 – 2 922 3 396 2 622 3 062 3 335 3 376 3 983 1 457 1 335 2 351 2 448 4 164 2 768 3 719 2 643 4 306 – – – 3 387 – 5 065 3 013 2 309 2 472 3 375 3 777 2 768 2 211 603 1 682 1 827 3 431 2 498 3 280 2 377 3 678 1 538 – – 2 455 – 1 452 2 293 4 021 3 987 2 569 3 261 4 546 1 220 790 3 350 3 134 4 764 4 290 2 027 3 030 4 151 – – – – – 298 3 594 3 325 3 510 1 085 3 314 4 236 1 082 1 114 3 178 3 265 4 155 3 984 2 590 2 986 3 345 – – – – – 1 589 3 119 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of pineapples and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month Tons 1 500 2 000 2 500 3 000 3 500 4 000 R/t o n

(29)

9. Potatoes

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 10 180 21 493 2 023 999 8 790 2 483 1 899 7 081 2 932 1 624 2 458 1 735 4 324 551 498 459 232 1 710 172 316 71 969 9 671 21 056 1 750 788 8 589 3 313 2 541 7 773 2 903 1 491 1 960 1 652 3 804 726 367 462 247 1 886 262 299 71 550 9 675 19 491 1 589 809 7 319 2 826 1 989 6 387 2 461 1 624 1 989 1 399 3 974 749 341 340 463 1 540 115 278 65 368 10 120 19 221 1 834 870 9 062 2 676 1 823 6 947 2 603 1 324 1 955 1 561 3 617 753 325 371 563 1 276 202 307 67 420 11 723 21 928 1 728 877 8 608 3 483 2 136 9 340 3 041 1 381 2 383 1 598 3 907 856 310 363 535 1 423 169 544 76 342 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 2 419 2 451 2 574 2 498 2 493 2 549 2 707 2 359 2 203 2 544 2 441 2 466 2 336 2 602 2 383 2 246 2 297 2 414 2 446 2 647 2 441 2 522 2 559 2 674 2 672 2 162 2 195 2 492 2 361 2 091 2 592 2 533 2 499 2 395 2 173 2 426 2 750 2 299 2 512 2 648 2 332 2 435 2 195 2 175 2 095 1 894 2 180 2 020 2 000 2 143 1 931 1 943 1 869 2 106 1 875 1 958 2 193 2 231 2 091 2 165 2 157 2 077 2 111 1 822 1 931 1 851 1 963 1 755 1 943 1 909 1 854 1 640 1 918 1 772 1 779 1 714 1 914 1 895 1 728 1 941 1 978 1 844 1 969 1 849 1 837 1 928 1 878 1 911 1 866 1 924 1 875 1 790 1 489 1 616 1 688 1 667 1 721 1 803 1 787 1 719 1 898 1 922 1 571 1 894 1 836 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of potatoes and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

5 000 6 000 7 000 8 000 9 000 10 000 11 000 12 000 J F M A M J J A S O N D Ton s 500 800 1 100 1 400 1 700 2 000 2 300 R/ton

(30)

10. Sweet potatoes

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 202 384 60 2 288 140 10 40 6 32 151 – 6 51 10 – – – – 2 1 390 213 290 40 2 144 83 9 37 2 15 119 – 4 47 17 – – 3 – 3 1 036 208 196 1 5 188 55 8 21 12 – 97 – 24 34 8 – – 2 – 3 869 329 341 14 8 200 45 5 45 11 4 69 10 46 34 21 – – 6 – – 1 195 448 560 34 9 304 84 – 64 27 12 110 79 84 37 33 – – 3 – 2 1 900 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 2 712 2 676 1 117 1 918 2 053 1 490 1 929 1 769 3 568 1 072 579 – 3 772 1 000 1 641 – 842 – – 1 532 2 002 2 230 2 785 804 2 115 2 506 1 328 1 434 928 7 295 787 597 – 3 001 1 052 1 308 – 952 1 851 – 1 891 1 976 2 370 3 662 2 500 1 040 2 811 1 429 1 697 2 114 2 453 1 016 573 – 2 418 862 1 384 – 588 1 660 – 1 243 2 401 1 462 2 003 1 489 2 128 2 864 1 259 1 699 1 299 1 927 1 550 833 1 862 1 628 920 1 031 – 774 1 828 – 1 392 1 800 1 270 1 793 1 567 2 275 1 959 1 495 3 005 1 168 947 1 730 984 457 1 025 1 256 1 133 – 1 000 1 895 – 3 233 1 490 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of sweet potatoes and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 J F M A M J J A S O N D Month To ns 500 700 900 1 100 1 300 1 500 R/ton

(31)

11. Onions

2005 Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. 2006 Tons TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total 3 964 6 596 712 194 3 349 783 992 3 731 1 333 460 530 317 1 125 113 156 103 192 770 216 92 25 739 4 660 7 719 749 144 3 771 804 1 300 3 920 1 413 442 489 289 1 211 84 114 75 115 975 252 62 28 597 4 007 6 164 629 176 2 887 748 960 3 025 1 023 405 515 235 1 168 110 115 17 138 926 157 79 23 492 3 877 6 235 565 196 2 527 737 810 2 953 1 282 362 550 290 1 012 71 134 79 172 864 207 46 22 977 3 461 6 564 464 186 2 199 800 833 2 827 1 018 365 414 268 1 052 53 121 11 113 914 175 74 21 923 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Total R/ton TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average 817 850 978 883 1 059 1 078 1 000 896 862 911 908 871 773 1 074 820 711 880 737 987 1 192 895 1 019 1 056 990 845 1 053 1 092 1 181 1 081 990 923 1 041 1 048 857 1 158 1 088 896 947 1 109 1 138 1 232 1 045 1 013 1 067 974 871 1 061 947 1 009 1 093 982 1 005 979 1 154 901 958 1 182 873 1 346 1 154 1 152 1 016 1 042 953 1 040 929 780 1 014 1 105 1 114 1 072 1 034 962 795 931 915 1 023 1 024 1 214 1 263 1 079 1 173 1 170 1 017 1 695 1 730 1 633 1 169 1 521 1 635 1 847 1 761 1 725 1 628 1 609 1 599 1 543 1 377 1 581 1 575 2 186 1 918 1 700 1 598 1 695 TSW JHB BFN KIM CT PE EL DBN PMB WLK KDP VER SPR UIT WBK NLS POL MPL KEI GEO Average

Note: A dash (–) indicates that the volume sold was less than a ton or that there were no sales. An asterisk (*) indicates that the information on the specific market was not available at the time of printing.

Sales of onions and prices received on the Bloemfontein Market: Five year average (2001-2005)

1 500 1 800 2 100 2 400 2 700 3 000 3 300 3 600 3 900 J F M A M J J A S O N D T ons 900 1 100 1 300 1 500 1 700 1 900 2 100 R/ton

Figure

Updating...

Related subjects :