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Modified In-School Off-School Approach Modules (MISOSA)

Distance Education for Elementary Schools

SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

IDENTIFYING COMPLEX

SENTENCES

Department of Education

BUREAU OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

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Revised 2010

by the Learning Resource Management and Development System (LRMDS),

DepEd - Division of Negros Occidental

under the Strengthening the Implementation of Basic Education

in Selected Provinces in the Visayas (STRIVE).

This edition has been revised with permission for online distribution through the Learning Resource Management Development System (LRMDS) Portal (http://lrmds.deped.gov.ph/) under Project STRIVE for BESRA, a project supported by AusAID.

Section 9 of Presidential Decree No. 49 provides:

“No copyright shall subsist in any work of the

Government of the Republic of the Philippines. However,

prior approval of the government agency or office wherein

the work is created shall be necessary for exploitation of

such work for profit.”

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1 GRADE VI

USING COMPLEX SENTENCES

As of now, you are already familiar with the kinds of

sentences according to use: declarative, interrogative,

imperative and exclamatory.

In this module you are going to learn one particular kind of

sentence according to structure:

identify a complex sentence

differentiate the dependent clause from an

independent clause

Read and do the exercise you will be asked to do.

Start now and good luck.

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When you were in Grade V, you have learned about the kinds of sentences according to structure: the simple, the compound and the complex sentences.

However, we shall first find out how well you have mastered the skill of identifying these kinds of sentences.

You only have to answer a five-item test now. Are you ready? Do this in your notebook.

Identify the kind of sentence by writing simple, if it is a simple sentence, compound, if it is a compound sentence and complex, if it is a complex sentence.

1. Martin had always wanted a dog of his own.

2. His father and mother would never allow him to have one.

3. He has been crippled because of a bicycle accident.

4. He had been strapped in a wheelchair for four years now, but he still has the use of his arms.

5. His parents would like to grant his wish, but Martin could not simply care for a dog by himself.

Check your work using the Key to Corrections found at the

end of the module.

You must have done quite well.

However, we are going to strengthen your skill in identifying

complex sentences, the dependent or subordinate clause

and the independent clause.

Let us have a discussion in our Study Time.

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Read this news item taken from the Philippine Star, April 20, 2005.

VATICAN CITY (AP) – When the new pope was elected, bells chimed at St. Peter’s Basilica.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, who chose the name Pope Benedict XVI, was elected Tuesday evening. It was the first Roman Catholic meeting of the new millennium where 115 cardinals from all over the world met to choose a successor to Pope John Paul II, who died last April 2.

Ratzinger emerged onto the balcony where he waved to a wildly cheering crowd of tens of thousands. He then gave his first blessing as pope. Other cardinals, who were clad in their crimson robes came out on other balconies to watch.

In the conservative Alpine foothills of Bavaria where he grew up, he remains a favorite son who many think will make a good pope.

Who is the subject of the news article?

Yes, you are right. The subject of the news article is Pope Benedict XVI.

What is the news article about?

Good. The news article is about Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger’s election as the new pope.

Where did the event take place?

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Let us take a closer look.

What have you learned about a simple sentence and a compound sentence?

You have learned that a simple sentence has one subject and one predicate, either or both of which may be compound.

The big day arrived early.

Both Mom and Daw saw the accident and reported it.

You also learned that two or more simple sentences may be joined to make a compound sentence.

Read the sentences below.

1. When the new pope was elected, bells chimed at St. Peter’s Basilica.

2. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, who chose the name Pope Benedict XVI, was elected Tuesday evening.

Each part of a compound sentence is an independent clause. An independent clause does not modify anything else in the sentence, nor does it depend on the rest of the sentence for its meaning.

To whom does who refer?

Who refers to Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany.

Would you say that who chose the name Pope Benedict XVI a clause? Why?

Yes, it is a clause because it is a group of words with its own subject and a verb.

But can it stand alone? Does it express a complete meaning?

No, it cannot stand alone.

No, it does not express a complete meaning.

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Each sentence has two clauses. And surely one is an independent clause.

What is the independent clause in the first sentence?

What can you say about the underlined part?

bells chimed at St. Peter’s Basilica

Does it also have a subject and a predicate?

Yes, it does.

What is the subject and the predicate?

Who is the subject; chose is the predicate

In addition, this clause also modifies another word in the sentence.

We went to the mall yesterday, but we did not buy anything.

In the sentence above, two independent clauses joined by but are:

1. We went to the mall yesterday. 2. We did not buy anything.

Does each clause express a complete thought?

Each clause is itself a complete thought

Point out the independent clauses in the following sentences.

1. Rain clouds gathered and lightning lit up the sky. 2. They may have stopped to eat, or they may be lost.

If you have pointed out the clauses written below as independent clauses then you are ready to learn the other type of clause.

1. Rain clouds gathered.

2. Lightning lit up the sky.

3. They may have stopped to eat.

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Now, study the sentences below. Notice the underlined words.

1. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, who chose the name Pope Benedict XVI, was elected Tuesday evening. 2. When the new pope was elected, bells chimed at St.

Peter’s Basilica.

3. Ratzinger emerged onto the balcony where he waved to a wildly cheering crowd of tens of thousands.

As shown below by the arrows, what word does the dependent clause modify in the first sentence? second sentence? third sentence?

1. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, who chose the name

Pope Benedict XVI, was elected Tuesday evening.

The dependent clause modifies Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger.

2. When the new pope was elected, bells chimed at St. Peter’s Basilica.

The dependent clause modifies chimed

2. Ratzinger emerged onto the balcony where he waved to a

wildly cheering crowd of tens of thousands.

The dependent clause modifies balcony.

Each sentence above is called complex sentence. What clauses make up this kind of sentence?

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Study more complex sentences below. Find out how the dependent clauses are used in the sentences.

1. Adjective Clauses

I finished reading the book that you loaned me.

We gave the stray kitten which we found a hearty meal.

Anyone who comes in will be fed.

2. Adverb Clauses

When it is raining, you should bring an umbrella.

Marilen seemed happy wherever she was.

Driving a car if you do not have a license is illegal.

We decided to keep quiet so that we could hear our teacher well.

What words begin each adverb clause?

Words like when, wherever, if, and so that introduce clauses and connect them to the main clause. They are called subordinating

conjunctions.

Here is a list of some common subordinating conjunctions.

after as long as if though

although because since unless

as before so that until

as if even though than when

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Let us now build your understanding and skills.

A. STARTER

Write the answers to all the exercises in your notebook. a. Choose the dependent clauses.

1. The boy set off down the road until he came to the market. 2. When the people found out he was an ex-convict, they

avoided him.

3. Though she was good and lovely, she had one strange habit. 4. The men who mine gold near the stream are very poor

people.

5. Children run whenever they saw the hunchback. 6. The couple stayed at the lake until the break of dawn. 7. As long as he needs me, I will help him.

Practice Time

KEY POINTS

A complex sentence consists of one independent clause or one or more dependent or subordinate clauses.

A clause is a group of words with its own subject and a verb.

An independent clause can stand by itself as a complete sentence.

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8. The man whose playing you admired is an internationally famous violinist.

9. I made whoever was hungry a sandwich. 10.We came when she called.

b. Choose the appropriate subordinating conjunction for each sentence.

1. Kublai Khan, the Chinese emperor was richer (than, that) any European king.

2. New roads, canals and cities were built (so that, because) people could travel easily and safely.

3. (When, Where) his mother dies, he was barely five years old. 4. (Before, After) years of war, most people would want to live

quietly.

5. The composer still has to decide (which, whom) instruments should be playing at one time.

6. The flight was delayed (because, on account of) the wind was so strong.

7. It looks (that, as if) it is going to rain.

8. (Since, While) she cannot come over, we’ll just have to go to her place.

9. The firemen left the place (before, after) the fire was totally put out.

10. (Although, Because) the sun was hot, the farmers continued to work.

Check your work using the Key to Corrections

How well did you do? Good work!

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B. REINFORCER

Now that you can differentiate a dependent clause from an independent clause and the use of subordinating conjunctions, let us try if you can now make a complex sentence.

You are not going to write a complete sentence. You are going to complete the sentence by adding clauses to make it more meaningful.

Do the exercise in your notebook.

You need the guidance of your teacher in doing this.

Example:

The children continued to go to school. though they had to walk for a mile or so.

1. We will make our projects if ____________________.

2. Mang Imon has been our tenant since ___________________. 3. Unless ____________________, the strikers will not stop.

4. Working until __________________, the laundry woman became arthritic.

5. My father has to work for hours because __________________. 6. Will we ever sing as well as __________________?

7. Leaves use sunlight to make food for the plant so ________________.

8. No one has ever seen the ozone layer because ________________.

9. The field which ___________________.

10. The trouble with learning English is that __________________.

Were you able to complete the sentences?

Very well.

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Identify the dependent/subordinate clause and the independent clause.

Write the answers in your notebook using two columns: one for dependent clause and another for independent clause.

1. When something that causes diseases goes into the body, the immune system goes to work.

2. Nobody knows why some people’s bodies fight harmless things. 3. The thicker ozone blanket keeps out the sunlight, so the weather

becomes cooler.

4. Astronomers who study stars and planets are very curious about sunspots.

5. Long ago because the earth was so cold, the glaciers didn’t melt.

Check your work using the Key to Corrections below.

Sure you did well!

The final activity will allow you to express yourself as well as

your ideas.

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12 WRAPPING UP

Congratulations!

It is a job well done!

Look at the picture. Is that who you are?

You are now going to write a paragraph describing yourself in five to seven (5 – 7) sentences using complex sentences.

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Key to Corrections

REVIEW TIME

1. simple 2. simple 3. complex 4. compound 5. compound

STARTER

a. 1. until he came to the market

2. When the people found out he was an ex-convict 3. Though she was good and lovely

4. who mine gold near the stream 5. whenever they saw the hunchback 6. until the break of dawn

7. As long as he needs me 8. whose playing you admired 9. whoever was hungry

10. when she called

b. 1. than 2. so that 3. when 4. after 5. which 6. because 7. as if

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TEST YOURSELF

Independent Clause Dependent Clause 1. When something goes into the

body, the immune system goes to work

1. that causes diseases

2. Nobody knows 2. why some people’s bodies fight harmless things

3. The thicker ozone blanket keeps

out the sunlight 3. so the weather becomes cooler 4. Astronomers are very curious

about sunspots 4. who study stars and planets 5. Long ago, the glaciers didn’t

melt 5. because the earth was cold

Rating Scale

10 Outstanding

9 Very Satisfactory 7 - 8 Satisfactory

5 - 6 Fairly Satisfactory 3 - 4 Fair

1 - 2 Needs Improvement

5 Outstanding

4 Very Satisfactory 3 Satisfactory

2 Fairly Satisfactory 1 Fair

References

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