Jaimini Bharata

225 

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)

THE

JAIMINI

BHARATA,

A CELEBRATED

CANARESE

POEM.

WITH

TRANSLATION

AND

NOTES

BY

DANIEL

SANDERSON,

WB8LITAN MlSnONART.

BANGALORE:

PBIMTED AT THH WBSLBYAN HISSIOX 7BESS. 1853.

(8)

I.njZ.4^r^'/o

FEB

2C

1916

(9)

c?;5Xo7;J'd7jtf xt)rs;" "i" j^^zi^X ^o

a^b-zSiJ^7^di:)?S^"ioX^ot7ot"7i)i5

75^;3^T^e;oSo";A,^TJsl)r"?^7o^8^oc^75oz5^ol)?\e(^

||o||

ib^i;6^^"^TJijo^^Ti)3dT3 coTJ QDjoz3i^eA);5^o7gdboSjd5j* I

TRANSLATION.

Verse. 1. May the moon-face^ of Vishnu of D^vapura^,

always suffused by moonlight-smile full of delightful

favour-ambrosial

rays ^," at which the Chakora

eye of Lakshmi is

enraptured *, the lotus-bud heart of the devout expands *, and

the sea of the world's

pure happiness rises and overflows its

l)ounds 6,

" give us joy.

2. May he whose spotless form shines adorned with the unri-valled

serpent-ornament, " at whose lotus-feet N"rada and all

the Munis bow, " whose head-jewel is the moon, " who fulfils

Notel. A

very common figure in Hindu 4. Or nourished. The Chak6ra is a

poetry. "Women are often distinguished bird said to live exclusively in the air,

as the moon-faced ones. never coming to the ground, and to feed 2. i.

e. as worshipped at D^vapura, only on the rays of the moon. When

where the descendants of the poet still the moon rises, it remains in a fixed po-reside. sition with its mouth open towards the

3. Properiy digits ; of which the Hin- moon, and drinks in its rays with intoxi-dus reckon sixteen. The moon is the eating delight.

So the

eye of Lakshmi

repository of the ambrosia of the gods, towards her husband. Its waning is caused by their drinking 5. The lotus-bud

opens at night, and the ambrosia, which preserves their im- closes at day-break,

mortality, and which is replenished by 6. The influence of the moon causing

(10)

^AIMIKI

BkARATA,

Cpi"i5^c"SD7i^5SDo7S^i5Xoi^^7;S-do73e/s658^o^:$;l^^

||_r:|

the desire of

P"rvati,

" who receives the

homage

of all

deities,

" of world-wide

glory,

" the

triple

eyed,

" the sustainer of the

heavenly

Ganges

7,

" ever preserve us.

3.

May

Vindyaka,

giver

of all success

",

heautiful

by

his

elephant

form

huge

as the eastern mountain " whose unsullied

7.The followingisa briefsummary of

the originof the Ganges, as detailed in

several sections of the firstpart of the

Bamdyana. Ganga was the daughterof

Himavat kingofmountaias,and givenby

him to the gods.

Sdgara kingofAy6dhyahad by one of hiswives sixtythousand sons. "Whilst

performingthe horse-sacrifice,the horse

was stolen. He commanded hissons to go and search for it. Not findingiton

theearthythey dug down to Pdtfila,where

Iheyfound the horse feeding,and Kapila Muni near it in profound meditation.

On beingchargedwith the theft,he by

one glancereduced them all to ashes. On account oftheirlong absence,S^ara sent hisgrandson,Ansumat, to seek for

them. He found theirashes,and the horse feedingnear them. Unable to find

water to pour on the ashes,he was di-rected

by Kapila (whowas a minor incar-nation

ofVishnu,) not to pour common water upon them, but now to take the hor")e and completehisgrandfather'ssa-crifice

; and be assured that his

(Ansu-mat's)grandsonshould obtain for their ashes the heavenly Ganges. Sdgara reigned30,000 years; Ansumat 32,000;

his son Dilipa30,000;hisgrandson

Bha-girathaintent,as hisancestors had been,

on bringingdown theGanges,persevered

ina longcourse of austerities. After

1000 years Bramha signifiedhis

plea-sure

by commandinghim tc ask a boon.

He begged that the sons of

Sdgara mightoltainwater for their fimeralrites; that,their ashes beingwetted by the

celestialGanges, they mightascend to

heaven. Bramha grantedhisrequeston

condition that he prevailedon Siva to

break the fallof the waters; else the earth would be washed away.

By further austerities be propitiated

Siva,who engaged to receive the god-dess, and commanded her to descend. In anger she resolved tobear him down by her stream; but he, aware of her

proud resolve,detained her in his hair. When Bhagiratha appliedto him forthe

waters, Siva reminded him that his re-quest was only that he should "re-ceive" the Ganges. Bhagirathaengaged in further austerities,and Siva being

pleasedwith them dischargedthe waters

from his locks inseven streams ; one of

which followed the king. As he led the

way in a splendidchariot,the Ganges

followed;but, overflowinga sacrifice

which Jahnu was performing,the enra-ged

Muni drank up the whole,but was

afterwards prevailedupon to dischargeit

from his ear. Thence the stream follow-ed the kingto Pat61a,washed the ashes, and liberated his ancestors the sons of

Sagara.

8. Vin^yaka,the godof difficulties,is

invoked beforeundertaking

(11)

CHAPTER 1. 3

S^sro^lAT5e-^e^7:b3l)S(5BooSt":"^^si)c"^?^Xje)a^J5)5a||

^ 11

"^"d-zSxjUiDZiJs-sl"o^-dc"i)S7^^oXol"o

/tS:5tTSJr*oi)o)

s;"'d75?i8tfT)^^c5i"i^cSoX^

tSj^C^rso

a"^"dtSo^ii7C"psXrstfe;^7f")tWd95'd2Szi5'Oo*

tO^

^I

tusks are the firstbeams of the

mornings

the crimson on his forehead the rosy

dawn,

his brilliant

jewelled

crown the sun

rising

with

golden

rays," ^remove from us all

impediment.

4. O

mother,

queen of Bramha adored

by

all the

gods,

(them-

selves

worshipped

in

heaven,

earth,

and

hell,)

the

bountiful,

the

auspicious,

the

serpent-haired

9,

the

goddess

of

speech,

" that this

poem may

delight

all the

world,

smile thou upon me, per-vade my

lotus-mouth^o,

and vouchsafe to me clear

understanding.

6.

Through

the favour of Saraswati I shall utter a poem

resembling

the

dignified

character of a

good

man

walking

in the way of

righteousness,

who looks not upon the

property

of

others,

(departs

not from the proper

meaning

of

words,)

shews no disres-pect

to the

holy,(preserves

the

pause,)

maintains the honour of his

family,

(makes

no

faultyconstruction,)

retains all excellen-cies,

learning,

and

respectability,

(adheres

to

elegance

of

expres-importance,and frequentlyou the most in the east,and setbehind another in the

trivialoccasions. He isrepresentedwith west ; hence the comparison,

an elephant'shead and largebody. On 9. i.e. whose longhairhangsdown the his head is a rich crown, and on his back likea serpent;a mark ofbeauty,

brow the sectarian mark. The sun is 10. Saraswati isrepresentedsittingon,,

(12)

4 JAIMINI BHARATA^

c"5ooTS^;5T;i)'dz5e;;^"'doi)r"^ozSt)'do^^^o^7Se/^

7;jo"^'dj""lie- 11

^^je)57"^z$

jarso5^oai""psoz^"T5D5l"^^T^^^

^'C3")l)7do;5i3js"

||

811

sion,

metre,

learning,

and

dignity,)

uses no bad

language,(no

improper

words.)

Let allput away

fault-finding,

and attend". 6. Let all the

good,

instead of

abusing

the poem as

having

neither metre,

property,

ornament,

meaning,

sqptiment,

learn-ing,

nor

skill,

and therefore not fit to be heard " ^know that

Vishnu of

D^vapura,

in order that I

might

not be

laughed

at as

havingonly

made

myself

ridiculous

by writing

poetry, has gra-ciously

given

me a clear

understanding,

" and attend.

7. If instead of

churning

the cream,

taking

the fresh

butter,

and

enjoying

it,

one should

put

in

vinegar

and

spoil

the cream,

is the cow to blame ? So if instead of

hearing

the poem, examin-ing, and

fullyunderstanding

the

meaning

of

it,

one should

find fault and revile it because

modern,

what fault is there in the

poet?

Let all wise men know

this,

lay

aside envy, and listen.

8. Let all

well-disposed

persons understand

that,

as a skilful musician

plays

upon a

lute,

Vishnu of

D^vapura,knowing

that

11. By the use of words havinga dou- the same terms. The renderingsenclosed blemeaning, the qualities-of a virtuous in brackets applytothe poem,

(13)

CHAPTER I. 6

75"/"Xoaai^'z5Ti^^X^^a7;5i5^jsy3u^88ri"^?^^^tii3?5aXyt"

I

^KJe/'rf'rfOoZS^^^E-Tj^^OXi^

^S)jR}j3^o^")S55^^^

||oo||

whatever verse when uttered does not make the learned wag the head^^ is

faulty,

has

himself,

in the most

agreeable

language,

by

my voice uttered this poem "

^lay

aside

hatred,

censure the envi-ous,

and listen with open ear.

9.

Though

bitten

by

the fierce

poisonous

mouth of a vile

snake,*'^(wicked enemy,)

though having

dark

spots,

(faults,)

and

thoughsubject

to loss of

brightness,

(lacking

great

learning,)

the sentiment

(ambrosia)

of my poem, like the moon, cannot be

otherwise than

agreeable

to the

good**,

(gods.)

If to any one it

be

disagreeable,

who in the world can doubt that he is like a thiefor an adulterer** ?

10. Does a diamond mirror reflect otherwise than the very

image

of the face

presented

to it? So I am unable to do other-wise

than as those

who,

skilled in the famous Canarese

language,

uttered the ancient poems. To former able

poets,

therefore,

I

prostrate

myself,

and

sing.

13. As is done in toVen ofpleasureand 14. lit.the virtaouslyminded,an

epi-admiration. thetof the gods.See Note 3.

13.^The serpentRfihu seizingthesun " 16. Who hate the moon because

(14)

6 JAIMINI BHARATA,

11. One

Lakshmisha^

son of

Annam"nka^

of the race of

Bha-radw"ja,

Spring

to the mango orchard of illustriousCanarese

poets^^,

through

the virtue of

worshipping

with

great

humility

the feet of those who in their lotus-heart ever meditate on the feet of Vishnu of

D^vapura,

composed

the excellentJaimini

Bh"rata for the information of the learned.

12. Can the

charming

six-footed*

7^

(verses

and

bees,)

gliding

alongelegantby

their excellent

order,

(colour,)

beautiful

by

abundant

figures,

(variousforms,)

shining

replete

with the nine

poetic

sentiments*^^

(ladenwith sweet new

honey,)

famed

by

the

esteem of the

good,

(their

love of the Sumanassu

flower,)

delightful

to the ear

by

their

perpetually

pleasing

sound,

be otherwise than

ceaselessly

booming

in the lotus-lake*^ of the learned

assembly.

16. The titleor diplomahe received carpenter-bee,whose dark blue metallic from the learned : as delightfulto poets colour and boomingnoise are frequent as the season of springto trees. Other figuresin poetrj.

copiesread chaitra wana chuta, 18.The nine sentiments necessary to

mango tree in Kub^ra's garden. goodpoetry.

17.The measure in which the Jaimini 19.lit.the placeoflotuses; which are

(15)

8#;f:^s")TOUDS(A)iA"5"^lJ^7J;5tf^9D8^e;o^;6xi)'dad

||c||

CHAPTER 11,

Contents. The great king Dharmardya enquires of Vida^

Vydsa the mode of performing the horse-sacrijlcey and by the

advice of Krishna sends Bhima^ for the horse. Verse 1. Within the

egg of Bramhais the earth, 500,000,000

yojanas^ in extent, and encircled by the seven seas ^. In the

centre (of the earth) is the celebrated Jambu Dwipa. In the midst of this the bright golden mountain^ glitters to the

eye like^ the aggregate beauty of the celestial nymphs met for

per-petual

happy intercourse, or a mass of autumnal lightning^.

2. On the south of this golden mountain stands Hastindpura, renowned for its kings of the lunar race crowned with imperial

1. His brother. Kusa Dwipa, the sea of clarified batter,

2. About 4,600,000,000 miles. Krauncha Dwipa, the sea of cards, S"ka

3. The seven great insular continents Dwipa, the sea ofmilk,Pashkara Dwipa,

and the seven seas are supposed to form and the sea of liresh water.

alternate concentric circles : Jambu Dwi- 4. Mount M^ru.

pa in the centre encircled by the sea of 5. lit. so that one involantarily

ex-salt water ; then in outward succession claims, Is this the aggregrate beauty, "c. Plaksha Dwipa, the sea of sugar-cane 6. Lightning of the wet season,

more

(16)

s

^

7

JAIMINI BHARATA, I

"S^^^7i^p7^7S^%l"^:^^Jk)^t^^o'^'fiolS7i"R^si^oZi!^^^^

j|-D||

'

i3oSf

c5i)^ji)^a'd-dzS^^^rs-6oTi"8tf?oSb53tf(5iDoi38o^^e;^

-I [

7oo^S^^?t"-;5^o7;J")^rfoZ;t5'd^'d8p-d^TJ7g^^7|5(5i)^

||S||

vzffT^Sj^^^-S^cj

ai9!^;;5T^5o^:3^^-dT35a7dT)irfjs;2i^05

[ ;

3U9'rfo^-d^^^^Co373;t"^DDC5i)'do

8393'?j)T5;5-dc5S:x"5ilA.-d7St)^^T5^^7Sj"

fe^9fjae5o3^T5Ti"^8rf'd^i;^5^o.'doXai"db7^T;l90sTOn^

I

dominion. Its

sovereign,

kingJanam^jaya,

with eager and fixed

attention,

thus demanded of V^da

Vy"sa,

from the wonderful

story

of the Maha

Bh"rata,

an account ofthe horse-sacrifice:"

3.

Formerly,

when the F"ndus had

vanquished

the Kurus and obtained

imperial

dominion,

how did

they

protect

the earth? what did

they?

When

Janam^jaya, guardian

of

theworld^,

with

joy

made these

enquiries

of Jaimini

Muni,

he,

to the

delight^

of all

generations,

thus related to the

king

the

pleasing

and excellent

story

of the Bh"rata:"

4.

Hear,

O

king,

the

story

of the

P"ndus;

is itnot to the

increase of merit ? After he had overcome the monarch

Suyo-dhana in

battle,

Dharmar"ya

in

conjunction

with his younger brothers so

improved

the

empire

of

Hastin"pura

that the world

praised

him,

saying

Bharata,

Niala,

Nahusha,

and all other

kings

cannot be mentioned as

having

so

great

excellence.

5. In the

country

ruled

by

the

good

kingDharmar"ya

" what

(17)

CHAPTER It. 9

t^

6i3ct)tS^^ildaS2o"^5X"^o83a^

"^63d3oj5"^c;

tSToc;tSD

o3oooi;5aJ:"s-^^(33oo'6i"S7"5a";i^e;7Sj")5fj5)

||8||

chall I say ?" there did not

appear even the germ of

theft,

mur-der,

adultery,

lying,robbery,enmity,persecution,

deceit,

fear,

dread,

toil,

harshness,insolence,

alarm,contention,

anger, im-purity,

complaint,

imprisonment,

ingratitude,

trouble,

destruc-tion,

abuse,

injustice,

evasion,

trickery,

revenge,

vexation^

oppression,

separation,

weariness,

or

severity.

6. But in the country where the chief of men

^,

Dharmar"ya,

reigned,

righteousness,

skill,

fame,

happiness,

enjoyment,

love,

hospitality,

humility,good

fortune,wealth,

victory,

renown,

learning,

blessedness,

health,

ease,

perfect

truth,

unfailing

vi-gour,

observance of caste,

devotion,

virtue,

superhuman

power^"",

meekness, moderation,

liberality,

apd

compassion

were in the

highest

estimation,

and abounded,

7. In the land

protected

by Dharmardya

crookedness,

unstea-diness,

hardness,thinness,

or slowness had no existence except

in the abundant

curls,

quickglance,

breasts,waist,

and

gait

of

beautiful

young damsels^^

Madness,

pain

of

fetters,

enmity

to

9. An epithetforkiiig. ofbeauty; therewas no trickery,

fickle-10. Supposed to be attainable by vo- ness, cruelty,emaciation,nor dulnessin luntaryausterities"c. the land.

(18)

10 JAIMIKI BHARATA,

Sari, (Krishna,

or the

lion,)

and

stupidity,

were found

only

in

the herds of

elephants^^^

8. In

Dharmar"ya's

kingdom

ahitatwa was found

only

in the

charmers'

books,

ddnawdrana in the

forest,

saddruna in the

glow

of the beautiful

coral,

kalahamsamaya

in the

lakes,

hdravalaya

on the necks of the

lily-eyed,

anikdgraU

in the trees,mahdshoka

in the green

forest,

mdrahita in the

Spring,

" but had no exis-tence

elsewhere^^,

9. Kod^

(I

won't

give)

was the name for a

parasol,

j^oef^

(beat

him)

the

abdomen,

kadk (cut him

down)

the command to churn

with

good-will,

ali

(kill

him)

a

bee,

tork

(have

nothing

to do with

him)

a stream of water,

madi,

(destroy

him)

a clean gar-ment,

mudi

(put

an end to

him)

a female's

top-knot,

/at^e(crush

him)

an unbroken canopy of

clouds,

ar^

(pound

him)

a

large

rock.

Except

in these senses the words were not uttered in

the

country

where he

reigned^*.

12.The references here are to the fury sivans, and tumults ;necklacesiand cries of the elephantinthe ruttingseason, its ofthe perishing; many extremities,and beingcaughtand bound, its natural en- dissensions;the largeA8h6ka tree,and

mity tothe lion,and itsheavy appear- intense grief;joyto Cupid, and absence

ance, vvhich is attributedto dulness. of wealth. The poet means that the 13.The words in italics have a double thingsindicated by the lattersenses did

sense, and mean severally,theknowledge not exist.

of serpents, and enmity; furious ele- U. i.e. not used in the senses marked

phants,and the restrainingofliberality; by brackets,

(19)

CHAPTER 11. II

"6v

"djon^ig^pa^^Bs-X^

^Q5o(yov;"53^^7\""57o'djs

I

"^c;

"d:)oXor3ai"o^^s-e"roT557i5i)s-^arf

"6c^-do

oty;)o3t)"dSX)^^^X7d

o?ii5^oe--atf^-6Ji7o*d^^""c""a"^je"

||oo||

"d7d"ioi::5(2;^75i""5X^A"?"7j7Sje)zS^o^^o

0'i^i:5(^^^ae"5(^jS5X^sl"(yi5ji"zS5^0^^Fi)'^^5i^"^ri*de;js"

I

e;7CT$i5^T3je"5C^^^?d^ep^X^^j")oti-d'zSj""

zS(";io7)^^o"^oX'dsi)^c5Jj^^7d"ocr3

(^??j""X7od0^tar;"tvdo\

a87^75jea^36^?,"T5ac55^?oi"u;"7iB;^Kt"("oai-5d^

||oo[

10. In his

kingdom

allwere

Bhogis^^

;

yet

not inhabitants of

of hell. All were

Vidyddharas^^

;

yet

not

people

of the air. All were known to be

Ddkshinyawartis^'^

;

yet

not natives of

Ceylon.

All were

5'wmaw("ra^a5^8;

yet

not bees. All were

Gwm*-yutas^^;

yet not inflexible. All were Kdntdramitas'^^ ;

yet

not

trees

(or

wicked.)

11. If itwere not blissful

by

riches,

(gods,)

salubrious

by

perfumes,

(the

produce

of K"madh^nu^*

,)

eternally

suited

(as

a

residence)

to the

pure-minded,(gods,)happy by

its beautiful

lakes,

(nymphs,)

and

gardens,

and the

resplendent

palace

of the illustrious emperor,

(Dharmar"ya

or

Indra,)

would the learned

say that this Hastindvati is

equal

to Amar"vati^^ ?

12. The

spotless

fame of

Dharmardya

has

always

bowed the

16. A term for persons livingin luxu- 19. Virtuous;also bow*.

ry ; and the name of the serpents that 20. Connubially happy; also having inhabit P"tdla. only the limited enjoyment of the

fo-16. Learned perisons ; also a class of rest.

demigodsdwellingin the air. 21. The cow producedat the churning

17. Bountiful ; alsopersons inhabiting of thesea; which belongsto the gods,and. the south; i.e. Ceylon,the supposed giveswhatever is desired.

placeof B"kshasas or demons. 22. The cityof Indra,famed for th"

18. Lovers ofthegood;also fond ofthe thingswithin theparentheses. Sumanassu flower.

(20)

12 JAIMiNt BHARATA,

king

of

serpents23

;

expelled

the wisdom of Indra's

mighty

elephant^*;

fixed in amazement the

City-destroyer's

lofty

mountain's ; made the

dwelling

of Him who reclines on the

king

of serpents

jadadhi^^

; hollowed out the weapon of the

Benefactor of the

mighty elephant

which

praised

him'^.

put

to

flight

the

daughter

of Him who

supported

the

churning

mountain's ; and shone

greatly

throughout

the three worlds.

23. Pure whiteness is the Hindu at-tribute

of fame ; and is,in this verse,

fiven in full measure to the fame of

Dharmaraya.

The chiefof thd serpentrace issaid to

supportthe earth on his thousand heads,

which are adorned with jewelsso brilli-ant

thatywithout a sun, they giveabun-dant

lightto the regionsunder the earth.

Tliepoet here informs us that the bend-ing

of the head is not owing,as vulgarly

supposed,to the weightofthe earth ; but

that the serpent,thoughhimself of the most snowy whiteness, cannot liftup his

head in the presence of Dharmardya's

fame.

S{4.The elephantof Indra was produ-ced

at the churningof the milk sea, and

isofperfectwhiteness ; but isso farsur-passed

bythe whiteness ofDharmardya's

fame thathe stands in a state of stupor.

Stupidityissaidto be a natural quality elephants.The poetthus accountu forit*

36. PuRAMARDANA, the

city-destroy-er, isa name ofShiva,whose residence

isKaildsa, a mountain believed to be of

pure silver,and brilliantlywhite. In

former

ages, it is said,all the moun-tains

had wings; but their flightswere

productiveof so much mischief and dan-ger,

that Indra struckofftheirwingswith histhunderbolts,and fixed them in their

present position.But the poet here

at-tributes

the fixed positionof Kail^a to its standingin astonishment at the

whiteness ofDharmar"ya'sfame.

26. Vishnu makes the kingofserpents

hiscouch, and in the Krishna incarna" tion had his residence in the milk-sea. Jadadhi signifiesboth "*sea" and "stupi-dity."

Dharmar^ya's,fame exceeded the milk-sea in whiteness.

27. The allusion here is tothe storyof

a certain kingwho, bythe curse ofa rishi

beoame an elephant. As he went one

day to a late forWater, a largecrocodile

seizedhisleg,and attemptedto draghim

under. When the contest had conti-nued about a thousand years, th*iking's understanding returned,and he prayed

to Vishnu, who slew the crocodile,and

gave the kingeverlastingblessedness.

One of Vishnu's weapons isa large

white conch, which became hollow be-cause

Itswhiteness was exceeded by the

purityofDharmaraya'sfame.

28. To supportthe mountain Mandara

which was used as a stickinchurning

the milk-sea,Vishnu became incarnate

as a huge turtle,and upheld it on his

back. The Ganges ishisdaughter,i.e.

sprung from his foot. She is said to be perfectlywhite,but runs away ("o

the poet accounts forher stream,)from

the superiorwhiteness of t)harmar"ya*s fame.

(21)

CHAPTER II. 18

]

^Orfj3"drd^8p^l5sl"oai^^^7^0^1537j

13. The world extolled

Dharmar"ya

as, like

Vishnu,

power-ful ;

(related

to Bala^^

;)

like

Shiva,

king

of

kings,

(moon-crest-

ed;)

like

Bramha,

eloquent,

(four-

faced;)

like the chief of wa^

ters,

(the

sea,)

abounding injewels^^^;

like the fount of

day,

free from blemish ; like

Indra,

delightedby

the

possession

of

perfumes,(Kamadh^nu)

like the

nectar-rayed

(the

moon,)

pos-sessing

wide

domain,

(accompaniedby

full-blown

lotuses.)

Thus it was when one

day

V^da

Vy"sa

arrived at

Hasti-n"vatL

14. On his

arrival,

when the

king

with his brothers

prostrat-

ed

himself at the

good

Muni's

feet,

he,

stooping,

raised

him,

caressed

him,

gave him a

benediction,

and the sacred rice; and

when he had received the

customary

honours,

and was

seated,

the

king

bowed his head with

grief

like a delicate mango tree

drooping

in a

blazing

midsummer's sun when not a breath of

air is

stirring,

and remained silent.

15. When the chief of Munis saw the

king's

condition,

he

smiled,

and thus demanded of him :" O

king,

the state of

your

countenance

destroys

the increase of your

happiness

who conduct all the world's

empire*". Enough

; tellme your distress. The 29. Vishnu's brother. In thisverse the 31. The idea intended is that,the

meanings in parenthesesrefer to the dei- king's dispiritedcountenance indicated

tiesmentioned;the othersto Dharmaraya. such sorrow of heart as nullified all the

30. The sea issupposedto contain all happinessthat be had from universal

(22)

//

14 JAIMINI BHARATA,

" " A" O

7;S^'^c;^5l)oso^a)""oz;5^Tj?i^z3i"a7S^8;iT5oT^"e^?i^""(5oj5)^^

||o8||

king replied,

My belly

is dried up with

grieP2,

I cannot endure it. To which the hermit :"

16. Who shall carry a torch for the sun when he cannot find his way in the thick darkness? Who shall fan the wind^s when

he

perspires

by

the

unintermitting,

intense heat? Who shall

charm amulets when Garuda'** is

dying

from the infection of

subtle

poison?

O

king,

who shall relieve you when you

give

way to

pressing

grief?

17. As he

spoke

the

king

looked at the great

Muni,

and,

with

a

deep

sigh,

slowly

replied.

How can I cease my mental

grief?

Alas! We devised evil

against

the ancestor who reared us from

infancy35

^ Not

knowing

that he was our elder

brother,

we slew

Karna^s. ^e

brought

about the death of our

preceptor37.

Suyodhana, Shalya,

our nearest

relatives,

we

destroyed.Why

should I

longer

live in the world?

32. lit. isbecome pith,a light,sapless 36. The mother of the Pdndus bore

substance,well known in India. Kama to the sun, before her marriage.

33* Befarded as a deity. This was not discovered tillhis death;

34. The braminy kite,which feeds on and then onlyby her lamentation, snakes ;also regardedas a deity.

^

37. Dr6na, who was slain in battle by

36. Bhishma, theirgrandfather'sbro" a device when theywere net able to con-ther,whom theyslew inbattle. quer him.

(23)
(24)

16 JAIMINI BHARATA^

ing

to the

forest,

instead of

upholding

the world

hy

just

gover-ment? The

king replied:

"

21. Hear me, my

lord;

but without

Kama,

G"ng^ya*^,

Drona,

Shalya,

and the other

Kurus,

I have no

pleasure

in

universal dominion. I will

place

the world under

Bhima,

and carry to retirement in the

forest,

this

body

that caused the

slaughter

of my race. V^da

Vyisa laughing heartily,

said,

What's that? What's that?

Say

that

again,

O

king.

22. In

observing

the duties of a

Kshetrya,

can you sin

by

the

slaughter

of your race? God forbid! And will you become

pure

by ceasing

to

protect

the earth? I don't know. I wonder in

whut

chapter

and verse you found the notion of

taking

that

body

of yours to the forest!

Very

well ! very well I Be offto the forest

with you ; and we'll make Bhima

king^^.

88. Son of Dharma !are you mad ?Will the wise approve when you talk thus ?

Enough!

Let that pass.

Kings

of the lunar race

cannot but offer

great

sacrifices.

Therefore,

that you may have

(25)

A

CHAPTSR n. 17

^S)os-^i5'^;5pf7s'*"8l-c"5ji"?\8"^^

'6c"7^"A/5"jATi^ioT:$^

||_r"3||

in tbe world unsullied renown, you shall

perform

sacrificesand other virtuous deeds ;

and,

delivered from the sin contracted

by

the

slaughter

of your race, shall live

purely.

The

king,

with

joined

hands*',

thus

replied

:"

24. Well

then,

by

the virtue of your

benediction,

I will con-tinue

to govern the earth. Tell me

by

what means the sin of

slaying

my race may be

wiped

away ! Protect me, that the renowned

history

of the lunar race may not stink

through

me !

Graciously

cause my

good

fortune to dawn ! The

good

Muni

replied

:"

25. Be not

troubled,

my son.

Formerly

R"ma slew

R"va-na**,

and at a horse-sacrifice satiated the bramins. You also

shall

perform

a similar

sacrifice,

and there willnot be your

equal

in the three worlds." ^How shall I

perform

it ? What

descrip-

tion

of horse? How many

priests

? What amount of

gifts?

Tell me the manner ! The lord of Munis

replied:"

43^,As is done inrespectfulsalutation inghim had committed braminicide,the or entreaty. greatestof allsins;and performedtbe

44. lUvana, beinga bramin as all the horse-sacrificeto fttoneforit. T"kshasas or demons are, Rama in

kill-^

(26)

';

/"

18 JAIMINI BHARATA^

7j^^^?foe;t)83=t"'dXof";S^"rfFt)7o

iTSo

oi"^^?"X^OTjZSTl"ro^c55ji"?S?fo^

Tis

-^^(5i)ot?j""^a)""iTO

26. A monarch who governs well all the earth

by

his

single

sceptre^s^

havingprocured

an

elegant

horse whose

body

is of the

purest

white,

with a most beautiful

.yellow

tail,good action,

and a

single

ear of brilliant

black,

" and

being

also desirous of

offering

the

great

sacrifice,

"

by

him it will be

perfectly

accom-plished.

Hear,

O

king,lamp

of your race, what isto be done.

27.

Twenty

thousand bramins

honest, undefiled,strict,

of noble

descent,

well versed in the vedas and shastras must be honoured with beautiful

garments

and other

respectful

atten-tions.

To each

severally

must be

given

a measure of

pearls,

a

magnificent

horse,

elephant,

and

chariot,

a thousand cows

richly

adorned,

(with

jewels,

"c.)

and three hundred

poundsweight

of

gold.

28. When this number of bramins of

high

caste,

strict,

virtu-ous, and well versed in the vedas and

shastras,

have received these most

gratifying

honours,

sat in

council,

and

given

direc-tions,

they

fix upon the horse's forehead a

goldenplate

on which 45. lit.by one parasol. The large parasol;i.e. havingall the world under

parasolis the mark of royalty;and an hissingleauthority,

(27)

CHAPTER II. 19

D

oS7oo^^aTi^Je"(5i"^^z;5oS;^^^5^i5^a75p5T;5^^ji)^j"

||3o||

are inscribed the

king's

titles and this

challenge

:" If in the

world any be of

greater

mighty

let such

powerful

heroes*^,

detain this horse.

29.

They

liberate the

horse;

which goes wheresoever it

wills,

attended

by

numerous

princes

who satiate the world

by

scatter-ing

from time to time

heaps

of

jewels

and

gold.

If in any

region

it be detained

by

valiant

heroes,

the

princes

must rescue it. If

they

all

fail,

the

king

himself must go and release it.

30. Until the horse has roamed at will

through

the earth for an entire year, and returned to itsown

land,

the

king

must

keep

the

great

Asipatra

vow, and

afterwards,

according

to the vedas

perform

the sacrifice.

This,

O son of

Kunti,

is the manner. If you are

able,

undertake it. The

despairing

king slowly

re-plied

:"

81. Treasure I have none. If I seek it in the

world,

the

(28)

ItO JAlMnCI BHABjLTA^

ps;i"^7izi)i:;^i"di(*s;t:iGa9^^^

l|3o||

""c5S^7ooSjt"C"^^oi3o5^^ii-"u"^?\7?;ierd7o5of

ot3^

((3-X||

JiiWsix)^oa^(5Jo^^xiTJ*)055iD5^?;5';3c5i:"^W^?^

||33||

earth is afflicted

through

the Kurus^^. A beautiful horse with so many

qualities,

I have not.

My

brothers are wearied

by

war, I have no assistance. The friend of

Arjoon(Krishna)

is

not here. How can the sacrificesucceed with me?

Vydsa

Muni

graciously

replied

:"

82, Be not

distressed,

O

king,

on this account. I will show you treasure,

assistance,

and a horse.

Marutta,

king

in a for-mer

age,

performed

the

horse-sacrifice,

and gave much

gold

to the bramins. In

carrying

it oflF

they

grew tired

by

the way, and threw it down in

disgust.

That treasure is in the Hima-layas.

The labour isnot

great;

fetch and use it. The

king

replied

:"

88. Alas ! Will a dolt become

bright

if you

give

him the

mad-plant*8

?

My

lord,

shall I obtain fame in this

world,

and a

happy

lot in the world to come,

by

performing,

with the pro-perty

of those

bramins*^,

a sacrificeto efface the sin of murder-ing

my race ?"

My

son, does not the whole earth

belong

to the

47. By thebadKOTermentoftbeEiuniB 49. Takingthe propertyofbramiiw U the world had been ruined. regardedas one ofthe greatestsins.

48. A plantthat causes temporary

(29)

CHAPTER II. ftl

bramins*""? Did not Parashur"ma

give

this earth to the bra-mins when he had slain the

Kshetrya

race^^ ?

34

Kings

of

mighty

arm are the lords of the earth. Of that there isno doubt. Therefore itcannot

belong

to the bramins. If you

wish^

that treasure in the

Himalayas

is yours. In the

city

of Bhadr"vati

king

Youvan"shwa

fondlyguards

such a rare horse with an army often akshohinis**. Will not that be yours "if you haye the

courage?

85. Is this

M^ghan4da, offspring

of

Ghatotkatcha,

a

weak-lingss

? Is

Vrishak^tu,

son of

Kama,

a mere

braggart?

Your younger

brothers,

are

they

men of littleworth ? If you think of

him'*,

will Krishna

stay

away. Call not this a

great

matter.

Undertake the sacrifice. It will

proceed

of itself.

Why

further

doubt? Call the bramin tribes." ^The

king laughing,

looked at

the

mighty

Bhima ; who thus addressed him :"

50. One of their common names is wlio then refused him permissiontodwell

" godsof the earth.'' The questionhere in it.

impliesthat the king, though shrink- 62. An akshdhini consists of 109,360

Ulgwith horror from touchingthe pro- infantry;66,610cavalry;21,870chariots;

psTtyofbramins,had taken possession and 21,870elephants.

ofthe eartk,which ofrightbelongedto 63. Ghat6tkatcha was the son of

Bhi-them. ma by Hidimba. Therefore M^ghan"da

61. Parashur"ma is saidto have twenty was Bhima's grandson.

one times swept the Kshetryarace from 64. In Hindu stories the hero obtains

the "ce of the earth. At a sacrifice a^ the presence of a deityimmedialelyen

(30)

22 JAIMINI BHARATA,

^5dio"zSji)zS5i'd"ji)^??a),)"'do3i)^^;;j^oz5o;ijs'd"S^ai5^

||36_|(

T^^aao-zSj^zS-do^^o^cra-doT^aS^zS^^^zfTi^^ftS^oTS^

||38||

83X;Coro^oi""-ol)oS'd"oTSjt)ti;i;:i5'^^-do7:i"^ofo"rf^

||3^||

36.

Why

this

doubt,

my lord?

Begin.

V^da

Vy"sa

has

plainly

shewn you treasure,

aid,

and horse. I will go to

Bha-dr"vati,

and may I never enter

heaven,

if I do not conquer that

Youvandshwa, slaughter

the multitude ofhis army,

bring

the

horse,

and

present

it for the sacrifice.

37. When Bhima made oath that he would

bring

the horse for the

sacrifice,

instantly,

Vrishak^tu,

the skilfulin

battle,

rose, and

smiling,

with

joined

hands addressed the

king:

"

Sire,

Give m6 command. If Bhima's word be

broken,

am I sprung from the Sun's son^s ? -Mark my prowess.

38. At the

youth's

earnest

speech,

the

king embracing

him in

ecstacy,

exclaimed.

My

son, I know

thymighty

prowess. But hear me. If besides

killing

my elder brother^^ from lust of

territory,

I should send

thee,

my

boy,

to thiswar, alas ! how shall I endure it? Let the horse remain. The son ofKama thus

replied

:"

55.i.e. I pledgemy nobilitytothe fill- 56. Kama the father of Vrishak^a* filmentofhispromise. See note 36. See note 36.

(31)
(32)

t4 JAIMINX BHARATA^

himself ^^ cannot stand before him in battle.

Enough

! The

mighty

power that hews down the forest of

foes,

isnot mine. Yet I will seize the

horse,

and deliver itto your host.

42. On which Bhlma :" ^What

though

the son of Karna come?

What

though M^ghan"da

come? What

though

I

go?

If the power of Vishnu be

present

it will succeed.

Accompanied by

these two, I will blot out the name of Youvan"shwa's

ocean-host,

obtain the

horse,

and deliver it to you. Give us the

parting

gifts^s.

43.

Hear,

O chief ofmen,

Janam^jya,

ornament of the lunar

race! As those three stood

entreating

permission

to fetch the

horse,

Dharmardya looking

on V^da

Vy"sa,

said.

Should I now

send

these,

will itnot cause the leastdissatisfactionto Krishna? Favour me, my

lord,

for in thismatter I cannot see beforeme. To whom the Muni :"

44. O

king,

are you insane? Is it

possible

forKrishna to be dissatisfiedwith you ? Is Bhima who entreats your

permission

58. lodra. See note 25. accordingtoeastern enstom,as the token

(33)

CHAPTER It. S6

a coward? Let him

depart

with Vrishak^tu and

M^ghan"da

for the horse ;

dispatch

this son of the wind^".

In accordance with the

meek,

persuasive

speech

of the chief

of

saints,

the

king

gave to

Bhima,

M6ghan"da,

and

Vrishak^tu,

his consent.

45. The chief of Munis

having

blessed the

king,

and taken

leave,

had no sooner set out for his

hermitage

than

Dharma-r"ya, giving

way to

fear,

was

anxiouslythinking

vrithhim-self. If I

begin

thissacrifice in the absence of Krishna it will

not

proceed

; I will now send

Arjun

to call him ; when " ^likea

creeper

entangling

the

legs

of one who wanders about

seeking

it" a messenger in

joyful

haste

approached

the excellent

king,

and addressed him :"

46. Attention"i !

My

lord,

the chief of the Y"davas"" has this instant arrived at the skirts of this our

city. Hastily

the

king

arose, rewarded his message, and set out from the

palace,

saying,

60. BMma. bar several persons are stationed for this

61, This is apparentlya peremptory purpose; who duringa visit ofstrangers,

demand on the part of a servant tohis call *"attention*'atintervals of abont a

king ;but a king'smind issupposedto be minute, in order tokeep the royalmind

always so deeplyoccupied by the cares awake tothe presence of his visitors.

of government, as to requirecontinual 62. Krishna.

(34)

dar-26 JAIMINI BHARATA^

How eager isKrishna to fulfilthe desire of his

worshippers

!

Bless me ! I am the most fortunate man in the three worlds ! I have seen wonders

to-day

!

47. At sunrise came V^da

Vy"sa

Muni,

persuaded

Dharma-r"ya

to

perform

the

horse-sacrifice,

and returned. In the same

night

Krishna

graciously

visited

Hastinfipura.

And the P"ndu

princes

met him with the pomp of loud

acclaiming

heralds^^^

bands of

music,

and streets of torches^*.

48. The

king

then saw him whose

lovely

countenance shone

with the

beauty

of his

brilliant,

jewelled

crown, well

arranged

tresses, the musk on his broad

forehead^',

handsome

eyebrows,

largeeyelids,

long

eyes, fine nose,

gentle

smile that

slightly

shewed his

bright

teeth,

and

ear-drops

pendent

on his cheeks "

the abode of fascination" the

very form that

begat

the

perfectly

beautiful

Cupid^^.

63. Kings are always attended by a colours oflightsdisplayed,givethem an

number of heralds who loudly proclaim imposingappearance.

their titlesand greatness. 65. The sectarian mark made with

64. Processionsat nightare very com- musk.

(35)

CHAPTER H. *7

CO

TSoi58^tAsi)^7^8!)$fj""^aoj7oo-dr5^^-d

49.

Hear,

O lord of earth^^ i To the astonishment of the Mu-nis^,

Vishnu,

incarnate in human

form,

alighted

from a

golden

car, and with a sweet smile fell at

Dharmar"ya's

feet. The

king instantly

stepping

aside,

bowed at the bud-like feet of the

lotus-eyed^^,

who took and embraced him ; and the

king

affec-tionately and

tightly

clasped

Krishna in return.

50. Krishna then embraced the

prostrate

Bhima and the other brothers of the

king,

and

joyfully

proceeded

to the

palace;

when P"nch"l^^o came and fellat his

feet,

saying.

Save,

O lo-tus-eyed,

Recliner on the

king

ofserpents.Remover of the sins of

those who trust in

him.

Slayer

of

demons,

Upholder

of

Gover-dhana^i,

The

yellow-robed.

Wearer of the Koustubha

jewel7".

51. Krishna

kindly

raised the

daughter

of

Drupada,

conde-scendingly

addressed,

and gave her

permission

to return home.

Then

saluting

each

according

to his

rank,

he

graciously

dismis-sed the countless crowds of citizens and

retinue,

gave his hand

67. JaDaiD^jya. Krishna is saidto have held aloftoa one

66. Notwithstandingtheir incessant hand forseven daysand nights,to shelter and austere devotion,Vishnu had never the cowherds from a tempent raised by

90 appearedtothem. Indra todestroythem,because at Krish*

69. Krishna. Feet are often compared na's instigationtheyhad withheld from to a tender shoot,on account of their de- him the accustomed offerings.

licate softness. 72. Produced at the churningof the

70. Droupadi, daughterof Drupada, milk-sea,and worn by Vishnu on his

Mid wife of the five Pindu princes. breast.

71" The name of

(36)

as JAIMINI BHARATA,

CO 00

to the

king,

and,

accompaniedby

the officersof state,

proceeded

to the hall of

council,

and sat down ; where

great

was the

joy

of that

day'sijight.

62, Krishna

looking

round on the council

chamber,

which in

magnificence

exceeded the hall of

Indra,

said with a

rising

smile,

O

king,

the world contains no rivals of this your wealth. In the conduct of state affairs

Nala, Pururava,

Harischandra and the other emperors must

yield

the

palm

to you. In thiswe are indeed

happy.

53. Yes. But what of that ? In the

greatness

of those who

worship

your feet you are indeed

happy

! Is there any doubt of this ? Whilst the earth

endures,

will men cease to call you

Upholder

of the P"ndus ?

Enough

! Direct me what business of state I must now undertake. The

king

turned his face to-wards

Bhima;

and Krishna

laughing,

thus

replied:

"

54. Tou have no distant relatives^^; there isnot even a hint of

opposing foreign

potentates

; nowhere in the world is your

(37)

CHAPTBR II. t9

?R"8j^a"oT5o55T5s5;)^7ooix"5;5'do8aoTfcw)*ddr"^2iocP

I

law resisted; there are no further

conquests

to be made ;no ur-gent chase^^ ; no

hostility

in Bhima and

Aijoon

; no fault in Nakula and Sahad^va ;no unfriendliness in the army. O

king^

what state business have you to do ? To which the

king

:"

55. Is any

thing

hid from your feet who

pervade

all animate

and inanimate

things

? It cannot be.

Enough

!

Why

do you

merely

put

me to the blush ? To

day

V^da

Vy"sa

Muni came^

and

graciously

explained

to me at a

fitting

season^^,

the manner of the

horse-sacrifice^

saying

that itwas a custom of the lunar

race; and Bhima made oath that he would fetch the horse

for it.

56.

By

the

protection

of your lotus-feet we have

passed

many successionsof

adversity,

and obtained

royal

power. If then we

selfishly

enjoy

this

bliss,

will the

good

approve ? What would it avail that we are bom of Bharata's race ? How shall I per-form

the

world-purifying

horse-sacrifice? What say you to this?

74.One of the datiesas wellas amuse- 75.i.e. whilstthekingwas brooding

ments ofkingiis to rid the country of over the sin ofkillinghisreUtives.

(38)

30 JAIMINI BHARATA^

^Ti^^t^o"rf5^"5So^^7;5!^o^j"^

"?vljT558^'^oT5j5^^a'd

c^

ll^f

8||

67, Krishna

replied

: Are you

mad,

O

king

? Will you be

caught

in the noose of Y^da

Yy"sa's

snare ? Don't you know what a scoundrel that Bhima is ? Youvan"shwa's chiefsare not like those you have hitherto had to do with ;

they

are

mighty

heroes. Because the young bee

frequents

the full blown

jasmin

bush,

is it able also to resort to the

champaca grove^^

?

Say,

will you in

boyishplay

attempt

the horse-sacrifice?

58. Krishna

reviling

Bhima to the

king

continued : If he

had any sense, would this fellow cram his

big paunch

with

food

prepared

for a demon's sacrifice^^? Were he virtuous

76.The smell onlyof the champaca him with an immense vessel,which he

flower is said tokillbees. afterwards used inbegging;and though

77.As Bbfma and his deeds are often itwas filleddaily,he was half-starved,

mentioned inthe poem, a summary of the As Kunti was thinkingone day what storyhere referred to, isgivenfrom the return she could make to the poor bramin Mahd Bh"rata to shew his person and inwhose house they abode,she heard in character. hisapartment the noise ofweeping.

6o-The Pindu princesescapingwith their ingto the door,she overheard the man, mother from the destruction attempted hiswife,daughter,and littleson

contend-againstthem bytheKurus, came disguis- ingwith eager affectiontobe offered in ed as bramins to Y^kachakrapatna, and sacrificetoa demon. She entered*and

took up their abode in the house ofa poor enquiredinto the circumftance ; when bramin. Bhima, Aijuna, Nakula, and

the bramin told her thatinthe

neighbour-Sahad^va practisedbegging;and the

hood liveda demon who was in the habit,

people,guessingthem to beprinces,gave f^pm^^y yg^rg, of devouringmultitudes them food in greatquantity.This they ofpeople. The survivors being keptin broughtto Kunti, who portionedhalf

perpetualterror,agreedwith him to

fur-to Bhima, the other half to hisfour bro- nish in

turn dailya cart-load of food thers and herself. But this was not drawn bytwo buffaloes,and accompanied

enoughforBhima. Having the power

by a driver. All these he daily devour-of ten thousand elephants,he one day ed,recompensingthem by keepingthe

broughtfora potterday equalto a bun- country free from all other foes. But It dred ox-loads. The potter rewarded

any neglectedto come at the appointed

(39)
(40)

SS JAIMIMI BHARATA^

of a bear""^? Oho ! I wonder who is the most terrificform in the world ! I know your

thoughts.

The

promise

I have

given

I will not break.

60. Krishna

waggishly

replied:

No,

no! You are not the man to break a

promise

; 1 know you

fully.

Once in

battle,

ogre-like,

you

glutted

your stomach

by

drinking

blood with unloa

thingeagerness^^ Disgraceful

this! Is itan ornament to your prowess ?

Go,

you cook^^ 1 You fear no

reproach.

61. To whom Bhima :

Well-a-day

!

Fearingreproach,

I sup-pose,

you committed theft and

adulteryss

f

Though

a woman you didn't understand

cooking,

of course"* ! I wonder who itwas

that,

without

disgust,

sucked the demon's life^ ! But what has a

80. To reeoTcr a certain jewel,Krishna 84. When the amhrosia wa" produced ftmght with and oyercame J"mbaTanta, by churningthe milk^sea, Vishnu took

king of the bears ; who gave him his the form of a beautiful^woman to cheat

daughterto wife. the demons out of their share. He fasci-al.

Bhima publiclyaverred that he nated them byhisbeautywhilst the gods

would slay,and drink the blood of Dush- drunk their portion,and carried offthe y"sana;which he did. ^eMel t"""t contained it.-*The pointof

82. During the year that the P"ndus Bhima's remark is,you arc more a cook

were requiredto spend incognito,Bhima

than I, having been a woman ; whose assumed the disguiseofa cook. chiefdutyiscooking.

83. Krishna when a childstole butter ; 85. Whilst Krishna was a child,Pdta*

and is thence called,Nayanitach6ra. In na, an infant-destroyingogress,

attempt-additionto eightwives,he had a hundred ed his life. Any child,to which she gate

others,and the sixteen thousand mention- the breast,died. When she gave the

(41)

CHAPTfiR It. S3

cSi^tf

^iv/")ii"d^^Ti"a8g=t"'dilr")^^^^a5)oax)iS^q^

jf)

"d^e/JiofoTS^

||e d||

K^;59a""Je"^oo65^cSoT5'd-d^o^5?

9N^s3t)a3""^7;5sSj5^8^"dSo^^^j5)y30Ti3s-^7i35^o'rf^

||e-3||

^"^T^js^^tii^ai^i

g)d^7;5^8tf38o5-^?^'rf-dotfoi5i-5c5i)o^5oiT5oTSi?37o^^

I

cowherd to do with a

king^c

? I fear to say more.

My

word I will not hreak. I'llfetch the horse. Do you

perform

the

sa-crifice,

or abandon the

attempt.

62.

Krishna^

laughing

at Bhima's

speech,

replied,

Come^come

!

you are never tired of

quarrelling.

If you are desirous of

fetching

the

horse,

be off with you ! Cease your idle

prate

? I

give

you command. But

mind,

there's trouble before you; there are heroes in the world. To undertake this sacrificeis difficult; when

begun,

not to

complete

it isa dishonour to the

race"^. Take care how you undertake it. The

king

replied:

"

63.

My

lord,

ifwe have but the favour of your

feet,

we are ever successful.Whomsoever else we

have,

what can

they

do ?What is there

impossible

with you ? You must

graciously

support

me.

The

king spoke,

and fellat Krishna's

feet,

who took hold of

hiscrown, and raised him up,

saying,

Is there in all the racs

of

kings

a

king

like you ? What then is this horse-sacrificeto

you ? Undertake it I I will be

present

and conduct it.

64.

Hearing

the words of

Kriphna,

the

king

was

overjoyed,

SS. Krishna had been broughttip a- 87. The maririoalreadingis, To

Mm-mongst cowherds ; Bhima was of royal pletethe sacrificeadonis therace.

deioent,

(42)

84 JAIMINI

BHARATA,

resolved on

performing

the

sacrifice,

commanded

Bhima,

Vrisha-k^tu,

and

M^ghan"da

to fetch the horse ; then dismissed the

council,

dined

sumptuously

with Krishna in the

palace,

and

sought

rest on a beautiful swan-down

couch,

just

as the chario-teer

of the sun

appeared.

65. Crimson suffused the east ; the stars fled away ; a cool

breeze sprung up ; the lotus

expanded

; the young bees boomed

along;

the chakras

paired^s

; the

lily

drooped;

the sun, in radi-ant

glory,

climbed the eastern mountain's

top,

to see whither the

encamped

hosts of darkness had fled^^.

66.

Through

the

joy

of

reflecting,

" How

is it that

to-day

V^da

Vy"sa

the chief Munis

kindly

visitedme, and commanded me to

perform

the horse-sacrifice? How is it that

immediately

afterwards Krishna

graciously

appeared?"

" the

king

at once

cast away

sleep,

arose, and held a council.

67. Then came

Bhima, prostrated

himself at the

king's

lotus-88. These birdtare saidto roostapart, 89. The sun isrepresentedas alwaysin

(43)

CHAPTER III. Sd

Z5^-^^6i:^i^^^^XTif*5t^o'^'ri^^75^^s"^^

||6-8||

^^iXorfb^^^'rfjA^S^O^Oc"jaei^j^oaj^LozS^iiiTiiS

||o(|

feet,

received

permission

to

depart,appointedArjoon

to

guard

the

king,

called

M^ghandda

and

Yrishaketu,

took with him these two

heroes,

called for his

chariot,

worshipped

the feet of Vishnu of

Devapura,

and,

accompaniedTjy

a multitude of

heralds,

set out from Hastin"vati.

CHAPTER

III.

Contents. Bhima sets out

from

Hastindtati. From the sum-mit

of

a

neighbouring

mountain,

he

fondly

points

out to

VrishaMtu the

greatness

of

Bhadrdvati,

Verse 1.

Hear,

O lord of

earth,

(Janam^jya)

the continuance of the

story

:

By

successive

journeys

Bhima,

Vrishak^tu,

and

M^ghan"da

entered the

kingdom

of Bhadr"vati ; which

glist-

ened

with the

pride

of

being

like

Krishna,

in ever

possessing

the hand of the faultless Lakshmi*

, ever

resplendentby

the

celebrated' t(?anawid/^*

,

and the

progenitor

of

Cupid^.

1. The words mean also, receiving 2. Krishna's garland;also,lines of

wealthytribate. groves.

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :