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Authoritarianism in Police College Students and Non Police College Students

Authoritarianism in Police College Students and Non Police College Students

Suxn~fRY In comparing the authoritarianism of police college students and non-police college students, it was found that as measured by the Rokeach and Piven scales the freshmen police o[r]

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LEVEL OF STRESS AND MANAGEMENTS IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

LEVEL OF STRESS AND MANAGEMENTS IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

This paper study finding there was a high recurrence of stress in scholarly range among optional college students. Stress may be identified with academic and causative components of stress would be identified with college preparing, students and parents. Preparing students on positive adapting methodologies, diminishing stressor-related school preparing, and enhancing parents and educator backing to the students will enhance this condition. (Suldo SM et. al2008) 10 Students ought to be guided for stress element by school advisor or school heath medical attendant. Instructors ought to attempt to expel scholarly push creating components from learning environment by making proper strides.
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Perceptions of Cyberstalking Among College Students

Perceptions of Cyberstalking Among College Students

Researchers have only recently begun to in- vestigate the phenomenon of cyberstalking (D’Ovidio & Doyle, 2003; Finkelhor, Mitchell, & Wolak, 2000; Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000, 2002; Lee, 1998; Pathe´ & Mullen, 1997; Spitzberg & Hoobler, 2002). Findings from these studies support the notion that the ability of an online stalker to instill fear and gain control over a victim reflects the modus operandi of an offline stalker. Although the prevalence and incidence of cyberstalking re- main unknown, anecdotal reports suggest that cyberstalking appears to be expanding at a rapid pace, especially among the nation’s youth. Lee (1998) reported the extent of cyberstalk- ing behavior in a college context and posited that, to a certain extent, it was ‘‘a socially- sanctioned behavior, instituted and encouraged by Western courtship mores and ideas of romance’’ (pp. 373–374). To assess how college students view mutual romance compared to online and offline stalking, the investigator distributed a survey to 556 male and female college students at six universities. Six sce- narios were presented to students, two of which addressed cyberstalking. In the first cyber- stalking scenario, a stranger contacted a woman strictly through e-mail and chat rooms. In the second scenario, the stranger contacted the woman through e-mail and chat rooms, but he also began to employ conventional offline stalking behaviors, such as leaving messages on her answering machine and gifts on her doorstep. Slightly more than 50% of students responded that the woman was stalked in the first scenario. In the second scenario, 60.9% recognized the behavior as stalking.
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First-Generation College Students

First-Generation College Students

Despite the disadvantages that accrued to them in the selectivity of the institutions they attend and the experiences they have once enrolled, first-generation students who persisted in college appeared to be suffi- ciently resilient that these disadvantages did not necessarily translate into a parallel pattern of disadvantages in cognitive and noncognitive outcomes. Indeed, we found only trivial, chance differences between first-generation and other students in second-year writing skills, third- year reading comprehension, third-year critical thinking, and both sec- ond- and third-year openness to diversity and challenge. At the end of the second year of college, first generation students had modestly lower levels of science reasoning and learning for self-understanding than other students. However, there was counterbalancing evidence suggest- ing that the three-year gains in internal locus of attribution for academic success and preference for higher-order cognitive tasks made by first- generation students were actually somewhat larger than those made by their peers. The only consistent evidence across both the second and third years of the study was on the degree plans variable. In both analy- ses, first-generation students made significantly smaller increases in the highest degree they planned to obtain than did the high parental educa- tion group. This may also be a function of differences between the two groups in the cultural capital they bring to college. Students with highly educated parents may simply be more aware of the importance that ad- vanced degrees play in one’s occupational life and labor-market oppor- tunities than their first-generation counterparts.
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PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED BY WOMEN COLLEGE STUDENTS

PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED BY WOMEN COLLEGE STUDENTS

This contemporary research is an attempt to study on Problems Encountered by Women College Students.210 samples were taken for the assessment about the Problems Encountered by Women College Students from government and self-financing colleges. Problem faced by college women students’ scale (2017) constructed and standardized by the investigator and research guide is used in this present study. Descriptive analysis, inferential, Correlation analysis and regression were used to analyses the data. The overall result of the study revealed that they are facing moderate level of problems. There is significant difference among the College students related to personal variables only in their College type, Locality, Department, Mother qualification and No of family members plays significant role in college women student’s problems. The prediction model contained 4 of the fourteen predictors and was reached in four steps with 10 variables removed. The model was statistically significant, F (4,205) = 9.909,p < .001, and accounted for approximately 16% of the variance of college women students problem (R 2 =.162, Adjusted R 2 =.146). The Department and no of family members were relatively strong indicators of college women student’s problem, and cell phone usage and Mother’s Qualification was a moderate indicator of college women students’ problem.
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EVALUATION OF STRESS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

EVALUATION OF STRESS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

In all levels of schools, deaths caused by self-injury and suicide account for 12% of all deaths, a ratio slightly smaller than that of traffic accidents. [3] According to Campus Security Report Center, Ministry of Education (2009), college students have most reported suicide cases, followed by senior/vocational high school students and junior high school students. College students are at a critical period where they will enter adulthood. They are expected to be the elites in the society. Thus, they should enhance their stress management abilities so as to live a healthy life after entering the society.
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Adjustments of college students on selected dimensions

Adjustments of college students on selected dimensions

Parental guidance is very much important in this regard, which includes deliberate expression of affection, concern about the adolescent's problems, harmony in the home, participation in family activities, availability to give organized help when needed or asked for, setting clear and fair rules, understanding peer influences on self-esteem, adjustment to college environment can help the adolescents to a great extent. In the light of the above discussion an attempt was made by the researcher to study the adjustments of college students in the selected dimensions.
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Are College Students Borrowing Blindly?

Are College Students Borrowing Blindly?

going is almost certainly leading some students into decisions that they later come to regret. The problem with the lack of financial savvy among enrolled college students is that the consequences of their decisions come as a surprise to them once it’s too late. The consequences of confusion about debt may be most severe after college. It is possible, even likely, that this lack of knowledge will cause students to be surprised when their financial circumstances become apparent, perhaps when their first loan payment comes due. This surprise, or even fear, may impose an emotional burden on borrowers. More broadly, it may contribute to popular narratives about crushing student loan burdens, which are inconsistent with the reality that these burdens remain manageable for most borrowers (Akers and Chingos 2014). The potential cost of perpetuating these narratives is discouraging students from using debt to make investments in themselves that they could not otherwise afford.
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Hispanic College Students Library Experience

Hispanic College Students Library Experience

While popular rhetoric would have us believe that all young people are generally savvy with digital media, data clearly show that considerable variation exists even among fully wired college students when it comes to understanding various aspects of internet use. Add to this the fact that Hispanic students are more likely to be accessing the internet via smartphones, which default to mobile internet sites with reduced functionality, and the issue becomes even more complex. Students of lower socioeconomic status, women, students of Hispanic origin, and African Americans exhibit lower levels of online know-how than others (Hargittai, 2010). Also students whose parents have no more than a high school degree visit a lower diversity of sites, and engage in fewer information- seeking activities online on a regular basis than those whose parents have a college degree (Hargittai, 2010). This aligns with Salinas’ finding (2008) that Hispanic students do not have strong networks of social support to assist them in accessing digital information. In much the same way that students can speak English for years without developing academic literacy, students can also be computer users for years and still lack basic computer skills or understanding, which may result in an inability to access information that may be critical to their academic success (Salinas, 2008).
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College Chinese Teaching and Improvement of College Students’ Humanistic Quality

College Chinese Teaching and Improvement of College Students’ Humanistic Quality

However, in the past ten years, the relevant survey data have reflected the lack of contemporary college students’ Chinese culture knowledge. In 2006 the re- sults of traditional culture survey in one university of Shanghai show that: “The quality of the traditional culture of college students is generally inadequate.” In the investigation of the basic knowledge of ancient literature, nearly 30% of the students chose the wrong answer, 73.73% of students admitted that they had not read traditional literary classics for more than half a year. The proportion of students who correctly answer the date of traditional festival and the western festival is only about 50% (Li, Liu, Chen, Huang, & Wang, 2006). The results of the survey on the cognitive level of traditional culture among the freshmen of one university of Beijing in 2016 show that: “Students’ mastery of the basic common sense of traditional culture is not high on the whole.” Only 8 of the 20 common cultural questions were correct at more than 60%. About 21% of the students have read all four masterpieces. The rest or read 3 (about 27%), 2
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College Adaptation among Traditional and Non-traditional College Students

College Adaptation among Traditional and Non-traditional College Students

In addition to factors internal to the student (e.g., personality, self-esteem), external factors may also impact adjustment to college. For example, college students tend to adjust to college easier when they come from an authoritative family (Hickman, Bartholomae, & McKenry, 2000). An authoritative family is accepting, warm, and encouraging, but is also firm. They teach clear principals, giving suitable expectation without being invasive or restrictive (Blondal & Adalbjamardottir, 2009). Similarly, Johnson, Gans, Kerr, and LaValle (2010) found that traditional aged students who viewed their family as cohesive displayed little difficulty adjusting academically and emotionally to college. On the other hand, students that come from families that have conflict and poor coping skills do not adapt well to college (Feenstra, Banyard, Rines, & Hopkins, 2001). Again, these studies were conducted using traditional aged college students; thus, little is known about the impact of family-of-origin on non-traditional aged college students. The present study examined the relation between family-of-origin environment and academic and emotional adaptation to college. Given that non-traditional students have been away from their family-of-origin longer than traditional students, we wanted to ascertain whether these relationships may differ for traditional and non-traditional college students. For example, would these relationships have less of an impact on non-traditional students as they are older and more removed from their family-of-origin?
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College students perception of ethics

College students perception of ethics

Given the recent incidences of major corporations engaging in unethical employee behaviors and the aftermath of the financial meltdown in 2008, more and more businesses are under governmental scrutiny and hence expect their employees to maintain high ethical standards at all times. Learning how college students perceived ethics can be a key for employers, as college students are the main source for new employment due to their fresh knowledge in the field, their potent interpersonal skills, and their well-built communication strategies. By gaining an insight into how college students perceive an activity to be ethical or unethical, businesses can determine how these potential hires will make ethical business decisions when confronted with similar moral dilemmas in the real world. Hence, it is understandable why many firms today are placing the ability to make ethical decisions in the real world first and foremost on their lists of desired qualifications for new hires. Further, many AACSB-accredited business school deans are under the pressure to prepare graduates for the unavoidable ethical predicaments in the business world. Many top business schools have continue to stimulate a sense of ethics, accountability, corporate social responsibility, and environmental sustainability through teaching, classroom discussions, research, institutional best practices, as well as active citizenship.
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College Students’ Perceptions of Intelligent Design

College Students’ Perceptions of Intelligent Design

Given all of these events, we believe it is critical to assess college students ’ perceptions of ID. As indicated in the introductory paragraph, college students have been the focus of previous research on evolution, undoubtedly not only because they are the new generation of political decision makers but also because they serve as a barometer of the quality of current science education in the U.S. Learning what college students think about ID is important for the same reasons, particularly given the continued presence of ID on the public stage. Ascertaining how students view ID also provides a measure of students’ ability to discern the subtle differences presented in the discourse regarding evolution, creationism, and ID. We anticipate these data will inform the curriculum at all levels and influence future academic research on and assessment of scientific literacy. For instance, if students believe that ID is a scientific alternative to evolution because they cannot distinguish between scientific and religious explan- ations, curricula should be changed to emphasize such topics as the definition of science and its procedural limitations. The findings of this study will also provide some preliminary data regarding how the next generation of young voters and politicians may decide to shape science education policy, whether at the voting booth and school board meetings or through social movements.
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Behavioral Health Among College Students

Behavioral Health Among College Students

Tobacco use among college students, though linked with other substance use, is less widespread, has trended downward, and displays complex patterns. Many college students who smoke cigarettes do not consider themselves to be smokers. For these students, occasional smoking at parties, often in combination with alcohol use, is a social activity rather than a problematic habit. One form of tobacco use that has increased among college students is waterpipe, or hookah smoking, a social activity that is viewed as less harmful than cigarette smoking. Because tobacco use is legal for virtually all college students, most campus-based prevention efforts focus on ensuring a smoke-free environment. Tobacco prevention messages should be targeted carefully to focus on reducing positive attitudes toward use rather than trying to increase negative ones.
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EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

Transitions through education from school-college-career are challenging and difficult, especially for minority, first generation, and non-traditional college students. These Transitions are critical to academic achievement, program completion, and college success. With the current emphasis on academic accountability as measured by tested performance, there needs to be an increased emphasis, and more balanced perspective, on the development of social and emotional learning essential to academic and career excellence. Educational gaps have been created by underachievement and attrition.Nationally and in Texas, colleges and universities are challenged to provide educationalaccess and opportunity for greater numbers of students and to improve their participationand success rates. Research findings indicate that personal factors and emotionalintelligence skills are important to student achievement and college success. Newprogram models are needed to address the issues of low achievement, attrition, lack ofmotivation, and student engagement.Research findings indicate that emotional intelligence skills are important and perhapscritical factors of student achievement, retention, and personal health (Nelson and Low,1999, 2003, 2004, 2005; Epstein, 1998; Bartlett, 2002; Stottlemyre, 2002; Vela, 2003;Chao, 2003; Nelson, Jin, and Wang, 2002; Elkins and Low, 2004; Nelson & Nelson, 2003; Williams, 2004; Potter, 2005; and Smith 2004). Extensive interdisciplinaryresearch indicates that emotional intelligence and related non-traditional measures ofhuman performance may be as or more predictive of academic and career success than IQor other tested measures of scholastic aptitude and achievement (Gardner, 1983, 1993,1997; Sternberg, 1985, 1995; Goleman, 1995, 1997; Dryden and Vos, 1994; Astin andAssociates, 1993; Townsend and Gephardt, 1997; Weisenger, 1985, 1998; Cooper andSaway, 1997; Epstein, 1998; Nelson and Low, 2003; and Low and Nelson 2004, 2005).
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A STUDY ON INTERPERSONAL SKILLS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS

A STUDY ON INTERPERSONAL SKILLS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS

Interpersonal Skills refer to the level of mental and communicative algorithms applied during social communications and interactions in order to reach certain effects or results. These skills are character traits possessed by an individual rather than skills that can be taught in a classroom. The purpose of this study is to explore the interpersonal skills of college students in relation to certain personal and demographic variables. The sample consisted of 300 college students selected from Chennai city for this study. Communicative Competence Scale developed by Wiemann (1977) was administered to collect the data. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis and scores of the sample were computed. The result shows significant difference in students Interpersonal Skills with respect to their Gender, Degree Studying, Medium of Instruction, Residential Locality and Type of Family. The study also shows that no significant difference in students Interpersonal Skills with respect to their Stream of the Study, Type of College Management and Number of Siblings.
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Survey of Canadian Career College Students

Survey of Canadian Career College Students

By and large, the Graduate Survey confirms that many graduates achieved the employment outcome that they were expecting. The labour force participation rate of career college students was greater than that of public college graduates, as almost nine in ten graduates (89 percent) reported that they were in the labour force six to nine months post-graduation. More than three-quarters (79 percent) of graduates were also working at the time of the survey. Comparison of employment outcomes suggests that the labour force participation rate for career college graduates is higher than that of public college graduates (for BC and Ontario) and found work rates are generally consistent with those of public college system graduates. However, the proportion of employed PTI graduates who were working full time is below that of the two public college systems examined (i.e., BC, Ontario), and this could partially explain the lower average earnings of PTI graduates relative to their public college counterparts. Such comparisons should, however, be interpreted with caution due to differences in survey methodology between this study and the research completed in BC and Ontario. National public college data are not available.
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A leadership development instrument for college students

A leadership development instrument for college students

The Leadership Practices I nventory is adapted for use with college students and validated in a nationwide survey of fraternity chapter presidents.. Few people question the i[r]

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Mediating Factors of Personal Wellbeing in Gifted College Students: Early-College Entrants and Honors College Students

Mediating Factors of Personal Wellbeing in Gifted College Students: Early-College Entrants and Honors College Students

Many educational, behavioral, dietary, safety, and other factors influence the wellbeing of adolescents around the world (Currie et al., 2008). Previous studies examined multiple adolescent subpopulations, but none looked at academically advanced students. In this study, the Personal Wellbeing Index (International Wellbeing Group, 2005) was used to assess the wellbeing of 213 gifted college students who entered university in either an early-college-entrance program or entered at normal ages and were accepted into an honors college. One hundred twenty-two participants were students from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science (TAMS). TAMS is an early-college entrance program allowing gifted students to enter college after their sophomore (second) year of high school, approximately 15 to 16 years old at the time of entrance to the University. Ninety-one participants were students who attended the UNT Honors College. Honors College students are gifted students who enter college at a traditional age in America, after high school graduation (18 to 19 years old). This study also examined the participants’ general self-efficacy, beliefs about of intelligence, hope, gratitude, religiosity, and resiliency; and assessed any mediating effects they had on personal wellbeing in the high-ability college students. Data analysis included latent transition, general linear model, repeated measures, and regression. Results of the study revealed that dispositional mood and hope-agency were significantly related to the development of personal wellbeing for high-ability students during their first year of college regardless of age. Knowledge of psychological constructs that are facilitative of the positive personal wellbeing helps parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors prepare gifted students for success in college and beyond.
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College Students’ Attitudes toward Debt

College Students’ Attitudes toward Debt

Davies and Lea’s scale was designed to measure attitudes toward debt. This 14- item scale was measured on a Likert scale, 1 being “strongly agree” and 5 being “strongly disagree.” Sample items were “You should always save up before buying something” and “There is no excuse for borrowing money.” Higher scores indicate more positive attitudes toward debt. Davies and Lea reported an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha of 0.79 (1995) but in Norvilitis, Szablicki, and Wilson’s (2003) study of college students, the alpha was substantially lower at 0.30, suggesting that this scale did not measure a unified construct in their sample.
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