Housing for the Elderly (Architecture)

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Elderly people : local government and housing

Elderly people : local government and housing

Local Government and the State Government Housing Ministry to expand their housing programs not only by providing more rental accommodation for elderly people but also assisting elderl[r]

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Life Satisfaction among Elderly Households in Public Rental Housing in Singapore

Life Satisfaction among Elderly Households in Public Rental Housing in Singapore

Among the variables under factor 3 on “housing quality”, it is observed that “workmanship” has a higher fac- tor loading of 0.511(compared to 0.364) while “size of the rental flat” has a lower loading of 0.306 (as compared to 0.324). The elderly respondents stated that although they will be satisfied with an improved living environ- ment, they foresee that modifications will take up more space in their already small-sized units. Thus, while modifying their current housing to suit elderly lifestyle by the provision of elderly-friendly features could im- prove their life satisfaction, the reduction in the area of an already small unit size as a result of such modification could militate against any improvement in life satisfaction. A satisfactory trade-off may be difficult to achieve. Thus, modification of the rental units to suit elderly lifestyle may have to be accompanied by at least a propor- tionate enlargement of the units to achieve the desired result of improving the life satisfaction of the elderly res- idents. This will entail extra cost which the elderly tenants may not be able to afford. Government subsidy would appear to be the most practicable means of resolving the problem.
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How to reach everyone? : Factors influencing the use of digital services in the area of public housing by elderly people

How to reach everyone? : Factors influencing the use of digital services in the area of public housing by elderly people

The internet is an increasingly important part of our daily lives. Many organizations have digital services. Digital services are online services of an organization. More and more information and services of these organizations are now (only) available through the internet. Even though the Netherlands has a high level of internet penetration, not everyone can perform all the tasks on the internet by themselves. The level of internet skills of certain Dutch people is low, especially the skills of elderly people. Combining the internet skills of elderly and the trend of organizations communicating more digitally, it seems that the elderly are a vulnerable group that could have trouble with the digitalizing world. This study focuses on the factors that influence the use of elderly of digital services in the area of public housing in the Netherlands.
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Housing Wealth, Elderly Labor Outcomes and Financing Retirement

Housing Wealth, Elderly Labor Outcomes and Financing Retirement

Since the housing measures in the HRS are self-reported, a potentially valid criticism of using this measure is that respondents report perceived price variations, as opposed to actual market values. Figure 1.6.2 compares real growth rates of self- reported home value and housing wealth with the national real appreciation of home equity derived from MSA specific home price index, each deflated by the national consumer price index. [Insert Figure 1.6.2 about here] While the measures clearly show co-movement, more volatility is seen in the self-reported values. The figure illustrates overly optimistic prospects on home values during the boom and slightly pessimistic Fgiexpectations during the housing market collapse. Perceptions over fluctuations in housing wealth may more directly influence homeowners‟ decision, which provides one argument for using self-reported value as the housing wealth measure. However, our extension of merging MSA-specific home value index with our household data will allow our study to be the first to examine the effect of perceptions versus reality when it comes to elderly homeowners‟ labor decisions. We match MSA level house price indexes from the FHFA, along with MSA level unemployment rates from the BLS, and state level tax burden rate from the Tax Foundation, with household survey data through state-county identifiers provided by restricted HRS data. 2
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The changing face of sheltered housing for the elderly : past, present and the future

The changing face of sheltered housing for the elderly : past, present and the future

In contrast to sheltered housing, extra-care sheltered housing offers a new way of supporting the older people to live independently while providing 24- hour on-site care and support services that can be delivered flexibly according to a person’s changing needs. According to Oldman (2000), the provision of a meal, additional services and a more barrier-free environment distinguish extra-care sheltered housing from ordinary sheltered housing. Baker (2002) noted not just care services as part of the provision in extra care sheltered housing, but support with domestic tasks and opportunities for social interaction within the scheme as well as in the community. Extra-care sheltered housing provides a more intensive level of support than standard sheltered housing. Due to the increasing demand, many extra-care sheltered housing are being built and others have been remodelled from sheltered housing complexes and residential care homes. One of the reasons older people move into extra-care sheltered housing is the flexibility of care provision; which is considered one of the main strengths of extra-care sheltered housing so that, as someone’s care needs change, a responsive service can be reconfigured around those new demands. Therefore, the development of extra-care sheltered housing provides a further choice of accommodation to the elderly, as it responds to the need to ensure that older people have the option of living in a modern caring environment where they can live an independent life with care and support available when needed.
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Integrating housing wealth into the social safety net : the elderly in Moscow

Integrating housing wealth into the social safety net : the elderly in Moscow

For Russia to make a similar calculation requires three kinds of empirical data for the elderly: income; the value of the housing owned by them, particularly by those with l[r]

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Critical success factors associated with effective knowledge sharing in the provision of floating support services in sheltered housing for the elderly

Critical success factors associated with effective knowledge sharing in the provision of floating support services in sheltered housing for the elderly

As the population ages, an increasing number of vulnerable older people are choosing to live in some sort of home, including sheltered housing, extra care sheltered housing and residential care homes. The needs of older people are constantly changing and there is need for long term support. Older people living in sheltered housing with complex needs require access to services with a network of different types of support. Floating support, an initiative by the UK Department of Communities and Local Government through Supporting People Programme, aims to aid people with complex needs and prevent homelessness. Effective sharing of knowledge between supporting housing providers and adult social services can be established through knowledge sharing initiatives. This paper aims to identify the factors that are critical for effective knowledge sharing in providing floating support services for the elderly in sheltered housing. The main contribution of this paper is an extensive review of literature on floating support and critical success factors to knowledge sharing. This paper concludes that trust, motivation, effective communication, shared mindsets, leadership and training are critical for effective knowledge sharing in providing floating support in sheltered housing for the elderly.
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Current status of and factors associated with social isolation in the elderly living in a rapidly aging housing estate community

Current status of and factors associated with social isolation in the elderly living in a rapidly aging housing estate community

The aim of this study was to analyze the state of social isolation among elderly persons living on a housing estate that had been developed during the period of rapid eco- nomic growth in Japan, using the results of surveys involving these elderly individuals in 2007 and 2010. Three years after the research had been initiated, the number of old–old persons exceeded that of young–old persons living on the housing estate, and many residents showed a pro- gression towards a reduced IADL, increased need for long- term care, increased number of falls and diseases, and reduced frequency of engagement in hobbies, daily activ- ities outside the home, and social contact with neighbors. These changes indicated increasing health and social well- being problems among the elderly persons together with population aging, as well as a gradual weakening of the social structure of the housing estate. It can be assumed that the overall result is a narrowing of their daily activi- ties. In fact, the elderly subjects in the isolated group with a ‘‘low frequency of both activities of daily living outside the home and social contact’’ increased from 2.3 % in 2007 to
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Housing wealth decumulation, portfolio composition and financial literacy among the European elderly

Housing wealth decumulation, portfolio composition and financial literacy among the European elderly

There is poor evidence of housing wealth decumulation as an individual ages: in a recent cross-sectional framework Chiuri and Jappelli (2010) document how the ownership rates decline after the age of 60, but this decline turns out to be almost entirely explained by cohort effects. Once cohort effects are controlled for, the ownership rate follows a slow decline as individuals become older, reaching a rate of about 1 percentage point per year after the age of 75. Similar findings are shown by other studies (Venti and Wise, 1989, 2002, 2004): housing equity and home ownership do not decrease as individuals reach older ages. Elderly people could exploit other tools in order to face the drop in income occurring at retirement and finance their general consumption: they could move to an- other smaller unit by downsizing or they could exploit financial services such as reverse mortgages to draw on their home equity assets and obtain additional cash. However, the evidence does not support a widespread use of the latter: also, in the US, the country with the highest take-up rate by far, only 1.4 per cent of elderly home-owners use reverse mortgages (Nakjima and Telyukova, 2011). 1 The large reductions in home equity are typ- ically associated with exogenous factors such as the death of a spouse, the movement to a nursing home, or the worsening of the health status rather than with individual choices (Venti and Wise, 2002, 2004). Walker (2004) analyses how US elderly use their housing wealth and whether the latter is considered as an insurance against the risks of income shocks. By looking at the determinants of home sales, her findings report a strong rela- tionship between housing sales and changes in household structures such as widowhood or long-stay in a nursing home, though housing sales seem not to be driven by the desire to access housing wealth.
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Eva Pietrzak. Keywords: accidental falls, fall prevention, elderly, home monitoring, housing for the elderly, smart homes. What this paper adds?

Eva Pietrzak. Keywords: accidental falls, fall prevention, elderly, home monitoring, housing for the elderly, smart homes. What this paper adds?

Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched using synonyms and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms. Three strings of terms were used in isolation and in combination: (1) falls, falls reduction, falls prevention, pre- venting falls, reducing falls, accidental falls, fear of falling; (2) smart homes, smart houses, housing for the elderly, house monitoring and (3) older people, elderly. Google was searched for ‘grey literature’ articles on fall prevention, in both research and government report categories. Articles were downloaded to endnote, and duplicates were removed. Text and reference lists of major relevant reviews were searched for other relevant papers. The process of ‘snowballing’ was used to look up authors and ‘similar papers’ in the databases. The search was conducted in August 2012.
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A framework for improving knowledge sharing in the provision of floating support services in sheltered housing for the elderly

A framework for improving knowledge sharing in the provision of floating support services in sheltered housing for the elderly

exchange of information whereby a floating support worker gives something of value and receives something of value. The role of knowledge sharing is to improve the provision of knowledge so that each employee can access and use internal information and knowledge. The knowledge sharing process between FSWs and ASSWs can be divided into the following areas: individual knowledge, the exchange of knowledge among team members, the understanding of knowledge and the knowledge innovation of the organisations. Knowledge- sharing between FSWs and ASSWs is not just a document archiving and lending process. It requires each team member to be good at learning from their own past experiences, systematically and objectively evaluating their action and then relating the lessons learned for the general benefit of colleagues, which is the key to changing experience into knowledge. The concept of knowledge sharing has gained an enormous interest and sheltered housing providers are keen to understand, identify and explore the benefits of facilitating knowledge sharing. Knowledge sharing occurs explicitly when, for instance, a floating support worker communicates with other agencies about a practice or procedure that improve services and performance. The SECI model, as detailed in section 3.4.1, argues for the importance of face-to-face meetings to establish the basic sharing of tacit knowledge, which is the primary building block of the SECI process. Floating support workers carry out crisis intervention work and multi-disciplinary perspective as clients often have multiple needs; where an elderly living in sheltered housing requires a new grab rail or need new shower installed or requires day centre facilities to be arranged. There is a continuous flow of knowledge between FSWs and ASSWs through socialization (tacit to tacit), as noted in the SECI model. This dimension of knowledge involves the process of sharing of tacit knowledge through face to face or shared experiences. Given that tacit knowledge is difficult to formalise and often space and time specific, it can only be acquired through shared experience.
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Association of urinary 8-OHdG with lifestyle and body composition in elderly natural disaster victims living in emergency temporary housing

Association of urinary 8-OHdG with lifestyle and body composition in elderly natural disaster victims living in emergency temporary housing

Results In the elderly female residents, the urinary 8-OHdG level tended to decrease with time after the disasters. 8-OHdG levels were slightly higher in females than males and significantly higher among those who exercised regularly compared to those who did not, par- ticularly in females. A weak correlation was noted between the urinary 8-OHdG level and muscle ratio in females. Conclusions The in vivo oxidative stress level in our study cohort of elderly residents of emergency temporary housing changed following the change in life style, but remained within the normal range. The increase in oxida- tive stress levels of elderly females was related to meno- pause. A decrease in estrogen levels due to menopause
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Association between health risks and frailty in relation to the degree of housing damage among elderly survivors of the great East Japan earthquake

Association between health risks and frailty in relation to the degree of housing damage among elderly survivors of the great East Japan earthquake

As described in the Methods, health checkups were originally part of the national health checkup system based on the Regulation Act on Assurance of Medical Care for Elderly People of 1982, and participants were restricted to those who resided anywhere in Japan and did not have access to other health examinations. How- ever, since the disaster, the RIAS study has been provid- ing free annual health checkups to all survivors who wish to have one. In general, participants who undergo annual health checkups tend to be more conscious about their health [43, 44]. Medical examinations in the work- place are mandatory for employers to provide and for workers to undergo, whereas health checkups are largely the intention of residents themselves. In other words, continuous participants in the RIAS study were more likely to be sufficiently healthy to participate voluntarily, and survivors with serious psychological and/or physical health problems who were living in residences with ex- tensive housing damage could not have participated in health checkups in the first place. In addition, particu- larly in Japan, where the employment rate among women is relatively low [45], many elderly women were considered to be eligible to participate in the original health checkup program. This is inferred from the fact that many women remain participants in the follow-up survey, in contrast to many men, who only participated
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Housing assets and consumption among the Japanese elderly

Housing assets and consumption among the Japanese elderly

motive dampens the demand for reverse mortgages. Skinner (1996) suggested that altruistic parents who obtain a windfall of housing wealth tend to leave it to their children, who struggle with increases in house prices. Megbolugbe et al. (1997) demonstrated that elderly homeowners are less likely to liquidate housing wealth when their children’s income is low in the U.S., suggesting that elderly parents behave consistent with the altruism hypothesis (Barro, 1974). Elderly homeowners cannot obtain cash and thus …nance consumption in the altruistic case. Painter and Lee (2009), however, found that living geographically close to one’s children lowers the likelihood of becoming a renter or trading down for elderly homeowners in the U.S. They suggested that geographic proximity proxies stronger connections to their children, and parents are therefore more likely to save their housing wealth as a bequest rather than spend it. Using micro-level data from China, Yang et al. (2017) found that changes in housing wealth have no e¤ect on elderly consumption. However, in a subsample analysis, a signi…cantly positive relationship between consumption and house prices was observed among elderly homeowners who live with their children. They explained this result by relying on the fact that co-residence may enable elderly parents to provide childcare for their grandchildren in exchange for receiving …nancial transfers from their adult children. Empirical evidence from Painter and Lee (2009) and Yang et al. (2017) appears to suggest that elderly parents behave based on self-interested exchange with their children to some degree (Bernheim et al., 1985). In particular, the elderly may choose to insure against longevity risk by making an implicit annuity contract with their children, whereby parents receive an annuity from their children until they die in return for leaving bequests (Kotliko¤ and Spivak, 1981). Horioka (2002) suggested that one variant of this type of contract is an intrafamily reverse mortgage, where parents leave bequests in the form of housing assets. Because unanticipated increases in home values tend to encourage children to provide …nancial support, the elderly can fund consumption through the intrafamily …nancing channel.
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Tax policy, housing markets, and elderly homeowners

Tax policy, housing markets, and elderly homeowners

Using instrumental variable approaches, this paper finds that property taxes are important in elderly homeowners’ moving decisions. The central point estimates sug- gest that a $100 increase in annual property taxes leads to a 0.76 percentage point increase on average in two-year mobility rates. The median annual property tax payment in my sample is $1200, and the average two-year mobility rate of elderly homeowners is 9 percent. My point estimates suggest that the impact of property taxes on elderly mobility is economically significant. In addition, the effect of prop- erty taxes is most pronounced for homeowners living in areas that rely heavily on property taxes and that experience remarkable housing value appreciation. A variety of robustness checks are performed to test the stability of the found effects. More- over, eligibility for property tax relief programs reduces the probability of moving. In designing property tax relief programs, program types, program generosity, and program implementation all need to be considered to achieve policy objectives. For instance, targeting a small population of homeowners in great need of assistance seems more effective than broadening eligibility. Property tax freezes, although costly, re- duce mobility the most. Benefits granted through state personal income tax credits are not perceived by homeowners as property tax relief and do not appear to reduce mobility among the eligible homeowners.
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Elderly Households and Housing Wealth: Do They Use It or Lose It?

Elderly Households and Housing Wealth: Do They Use It or Lose It?

Over 80 percent of households in their 50s are homeowners and housing wealth accounts for over half of total household wealth for most of these homeowners. The evidence in the literature on whether the elderly are consuming their housing wealth has been mixed. Because home sales are infrequent and a high proportion of the elderly continue to own in old age, it appears that the elderly are not consuming housing wealth. There are, however, indications that housing wealth may be a form of self-insurance and that housing wealth is consumed, albeit at very old ages. To date, however, the evidence to support that hypothesis has been weak. This paper examines whether predictors of housing sales are consistent with the insurance story by looking at the extent to which indicators of changes in economic status and access to alternate insurance explain housing sales. The paper also examines the extent to which changes in health status predict housing sales. The results of the probit appear to indicate that, by and large, housing sales in old age for single households is mostly driven by worsening health. Widowhood has a large effect on increasing the probability of selling the house and the effect is larger if the husband is the surviving spouse. There are indications that poor married homeowners are consuming housing wealth and also indications that married households are responding to Medicaid tax incentives. This evidence seems to suggest that, at least among married households, housing decisions are financially motivated; however, the evidence does not by itself validate the insurance story.
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Solving Housing Problems For The Elderly And Seniors

Solving Housing Problems For The Elderly And Seniors

Large numbers of older Eastleigh residents are occupying properties they own that are too big for their needs and often difficult to maintain. They have the resources to meet their housing needs without the use of public funds by selling up and purchasing a purpose built retirement flat. Private providers are only successful if they provide the right product in the right location. Several such schemes are currently planned or being built in the Borough and it is likely that residents moving into them will free up family homes for other purchasers. As with other profit making developers, affordable housing provision will be expected in line with planning policy. Some owner-occupiers have insufficient capital tied up in their homes to be able to purchase a new flat, pay the costs of moving and for furnishing a new home. They may still however have a six-figure sum in equity and given the choice would wish to purchase. A scheme called Leasehold for the Elderly used to cater for this group by allowing them to purchase 70% of a retirement property while the remaining 30% of the value was held in perpetuity by a housing association. The purchaser did not have to pay any rent or mortgage, just the monthly service charge for the running of the scheme. When the occupier sold, they received 70% of the market price at that time. This scheme was replaced by Shared Ownership for the Elderly where an equity share was purchased. It is recommended that the provision of a housing scheme similar to these be investigated for Eastleigh if sufficient evidence of demand can be established.
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Factors associated with deaths in ‘Elderly Housing with Care Services’ in Japan: a cross-sectional study

Factors associated with deaths in ‘Elderly Housing with Care Services’ in Japan: a cross-sectional study

decreasing birth rate. Thus, the demand for aged care facilities where the elderly individuals can be cared for is growing, and this growing demand has led to a lack of nursing home beds [5]. Even so, the government cannot largely increase the number of facilities because institu- tional care services make high benefit claims to the LTC Insurance System. To ensure that enough beds are avail- able, the government excludes mildly impaired elderly individuals from eligibility for admission to these facil- ities, but there are still a large number of people waiting for beds (295,000 in 2016) [6].
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Statistics in Focus: Population and social conditions  Housing conditions of the elderly in the EU  1999 14

Statistics in Focus: Population and social conditions Housing conditions of the elderly in the EU 1999 14

Contents Type of accommodation varies considerably between Member States 2 Elderly persons living alone are less likely to be owneroccupiers 3 An average of 4 rooms per elderly couple 4 [r]

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Housing and social policy in Malaysia: provision for
the elderly

Housing and social policy in Malaysia: provision for the elderly

Government also gave some help to the private sector providers with some collaboration in providing residential care homes as mentioned in the Eighth Malaysia Plan 2000-2005 that two Rum[r]

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