literacy skills

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Examining the Effectiveness of Fingerspelling in Improving the Vocabulary and Literacy Skills of Deaf Students

Examining the Effectiveness of Fingerspelling in Improving the Vocabulary and Literacy Skills of Deaf Students

Literacy development plays a fundamental role in students’ educational success. As such, delays in the development of early literacy skills can lead to academic failure. The term ‘emergent literacy’ refers to the acquisition of oral language skills (e.g., expressive and receptive vocabularies and word knowledge) and de- coding skills (e.g., letter naming, phonological awareness, and print knowledge) (Kim, Im, & Kwon, 2015). Educators in the field of deaf education argue that early exposure to language and literacy is crucial for deaf children (Golos & Moses, 2013). Padden and Ramsey (2000) stated that the knowledge of American Sign Language and fingerspelling is positively associated with reading perfor- mance. Fingerspelling creates a linguistic correlation between printed words and syntax (Baker, 2010). Puente et al. (2006) suggested that fingerspelling “can act as a complementary means of decoding in reading processes, and perhaps aid in the development of phonemic awareness in signing deaf children, though it is a manual system for representing the alphabetic rather than phonemic units of language” (p. 300).
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A practical guide to improving boys literacy skills

A practical guide to improving boys literacy skills

Critical literacy, the practice of exploring and discussing the underlying assumptions in texts or works in other media, is a powerful tool for helping boys and girls “read” their world – for example, helping them become more aware of how various texts portray individuals, groups, and situations. The work involved in critical literacy makes sense to boys and appeals to their enjoyment in figuring things out. In teaching critical-literacy skills, it is essential that educators be prepared to welcome intellectual challenges. For many boys, intellectual sparring is a way of showing their interest and engagement in a subject.
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Story Based Activities Enhance Literacy Skills in Preschool Children

Story Based Activities Enhance Literacy Skills in Preschool Children

There was significant difference in favor of the experiment group regarding the literacy skills of the children We suppose that the positive impact of “Story Based Activities” program can be result of 1) carrying out conversations on concepts and words during the story based activities, 2) open-ended questions for events and situations, 3) entertaining children with songs, rhymes, poetry and finger plays, 4) drawing children’s attention to some details such as recognizing and discriminating words, using words in a sentence, browsing the front and back side of books, illustrations and authors, 5) involvement of parents in to the process, 6) integration of various activities such as art, drama, math and science in a systematical approach.
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Young People’s Views on Literacy Skills and Employment

Young People’s Views on Literacy Skills and Employment

However, there is a dearth of similar studies outlining the perceptions of young people themselves – both with respect to general employment skills but particularly with respect to literacy skills. Indeed, nearly 15 years ago, Morris et al. (1999: 64 12 ) concluded in their review of the literature that “No good quality research literature has been discovered on young people’s attitudes towards employers or the structure of work”. This is still very much the conclusion reached by researchers (e.g. Oxenbridge and Evesson, 2012 13 ; Price et al, 2011 14 ), which means that we know very little of how young people construct their identities as employees.
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The relationship between musical ability and literacy skills

The relationship between musical ability and literacy skills

Many researchers have shown that a relationship exists between phonological awareness and literacy skills, and a recent study has shown a relationship between musical skills and reading. It has also been shown that a structured programme of musical activities can be used to help children develop a multi-sensory awareness and response to sounds, and that training in musical skills is associated with improved reading skills. This thesis reports on a two-year study to expand the previous work. Fifty one children in their fourth year at primary school took part in the first year of the study. Two groups of children, matched for initial reading ability, were seen weekly. One group (intervention) participated in musical activities, the other control group in verbal activities. In addition, two boys with specific learning difficulties were put on an intensive experimental regime. The remainder of the children formed an unseen control. The results showed similar trends to the earlier study, but the intervention did not lead to significant gains in reading. Because the outcome of the work with the two boys with severe reading difficulties proved to be particularly interesting, the second year of the study focused on children who had already been identified as dyslexic. The
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The Relation of Inattention and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity to Basic Early Literacy Skills

The Relation of Inattention and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity to Basic Early Literacy Skills

There is some support in the literature for this possibility. Lonigan et al. (1999) assessed the relationship between behavior difficulties and early literacy skills in two preschool settings, one with an academic orientation serving children of middle income parents and one more child-directed serving children of low income families. Given the differences in children and academic focus across settings, the authors did not combine the two groups of children in their analyses. Although attention difficulties were associated with emergent literacy skills in both groups, the relationship was stronger in the sample from the academically-oriented preschool. In addition, some of the specific early literacy skills that were related to inattention varied between the groups. The authors suggested that the differences between groups in the strength of the relationship of inattention to early literacy skills may have been due to differences in exposure and instruction of early literacy skills. The results of Lonigan et al., as well as the results of the present study, suggest that
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Improving the Literacy Skills of Low Income Bilingual Preschoolers

Improving the Literacy Skills of Low Income Bilingual Preschoolers

In particular, BHS is a program based in the community center of a low-income apartment complex in Madison, Wisconsin. This program serves 18 children in a mixed- aged grouping with ages ranging from three to four years. To be eligible for Head Start, a family of four has to have an income below the National Poverty Guidelines ($23,050). All 18 children in the BHH program are from families whose income is below this guideline. In addition, 13 of the 18 children are Dual Language Learners (DLLs) – five are native Hmong speakers and eight are native Spanish speakers. These DLLs are at a double risk of entering kindergarten with literacy skills significantly below their middle and upper class peers.
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A case study for teaching information literacy skills

A case study for teaching information literacy skills

Additional factors, representing potential confounders of the previously mentioned studies [13,14], include the role of income and its association with prior educational expe- rience before entering dental school. Although access to these specific data for students in this cohort was not available for the study authors, summary data exists and has been released for this cohort that may be relevant to the present study. The Office of Admissions released sta- tistics that demonstrate 11.5% (9/78) of this cohort had no four year degree, 8.9% (7/78) attended undergraduate institutions that offered no masters- or doctoral-level pro- grams and 76.9% (60/78) attended public institutions of higher learning – all potential influences of the under- graduate education experience in gaining information retrieval and literacy skills. For example, many capstone or senior-level courses are cross-listed with masters- or doctoral-level courses that tend to expand critical thinking skills, foster student-student teaching and learning, and may reinforce evidence-based learning [15,16]. Because these courses are more likely to take place during the final or senior year and in masters- or doctoral-granting institu- tions, those students who enter dental school without completing their undergraduate degree, often citing finan- cial reasons, may be more likely to miss these learning opportunities. Finally, although the role of English as a second language (ESL) may represent one additional dif- ficulty facing students and ICT and ILS, only one student was listed as having graduated from a non-US institution, and no further data regarding ESL for this cohort was available.
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Creating engagement and cultivating information literacy skills via Scoop.it

Creating engagement and cultivating information literacy skills via Scoop.it

discussing”, he/she was still forced to look elsewhere for sources to complete the essay as the Scoop.it content was not peer-reviewed: “It did give me great exposure to the major players (researchers and companies) that were on the cutting edge of my topic. It was those names that I then used to find sources of better quality (corporate research material, peer-reviewed journals).” Another student similarly acknowledged the lack of peer-reviewed materials: “None of the sources were peer-reviewed on Scoop.it yet we were apparently meant to only use peer-reviewed sources for the essay.” In terms of using Scoop.it to cultivate information literacy skills, one of the students said that “while I answered neutral for some questions regarding the development of some skills, it is only because I have year of tertiary experience. I certainly believe that the use of Scoop.it would have helped me in my earlier years of study. I also believe it…will be helpful for students who are just starting tertiary studies and not just IT-related degrees but all degrees/courses that have essay writing aspects.” Another of the students reflected that they needed to “wed through a lot of irrelevant information and many of the popular stories were not of a high quality.”
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Fusing Information Literacy Skills in STEM Courses

Fusing Information Literacy Skills in STEM Courses

Enhancing students’ ability to conduct cutting-edge research in the digital information age is an important objective in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. The scientific research enterprise is a multi factorial process that involves more than simply understanding how to conduct specialized experiments and operate state-of-the-art equipment but also how to locate and utilize literature and empirical data to formulate hypotheses and design elegant experimental methodologies to address research questions. To that end, integration of beneficial information literacy skills in traditional and online STEM courses will prepare students for future success in other courses, graduate school, professional school, or the STEM workforce (Jang, 2016). As college educators, we observe countless students who demonstrate poor information literacy skills. Moreover, observational evidence from several decades of STEM teaching has revealed that a large majority of students lack even the most basic information retrieval skills. Students’ inability to identify the most appropriate source of data and inability to understand how to exploit electronic resources for scholarly gain typically result in less than stellar academic performance and marginal professional performance after graduation. This article provides helpful websites, Smartphone applications, and information literacy teaching strategies that will undoubtedly help faculty overcome challenges associated with information retrieval instruction (Leckie, 1996) and help STEM students at all classification levels gain confidence in locating and synthesizing essential information for course assignments and projects beyond the use of basic search engines most familiar to undergraduate students (e.g., Google or Wikipedia) (Laurent & Vickers, 2009; Peters, 2011).
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Digital Literacy Skills of Undergraduate Students in Nigeria Universities

Digital Literacy Skills of Undergraduate Students in Nigeria Universities

Undergraduates are students in the tertiary institutions pursuing their first degree programme in various disciplines (Osunade, Philips and Ojo 2007). Due to their heavy workload, the undergraduates usually search for information in various sources to support their learning activities. Depending on the mode of study, an average undergraduate is expected to spend a minimum of three years and a maximum of six years in the university (Osunade, Philips and Ojo 2007). Academic performance of an undergraduate in this century depends on his/her digital literacy skills to identify the credible information on the internet. Information and Communication Technology has pervaded all sectors of human endeavours.
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Assessing information literacy skills : a Rubric approach

Assessing information literacy skills : a Rubric approach

Accreditors en mass acknowledge the importance of information literacy skills. According to Thompson, “Regional accreditation agencies are now stating outright that regular library instruction should be an essential part of higher education and that more educational standards call for information literacy to become a central core set of skills required for an undergraduate degree.” 149 Gratch Lindauer states that in recent years most accreditation standards have increased their emphasis on the teaching role of libraries. 150 She found that many accrediting agencies connect library and information technology to student learning. 151 Some also acknowledge the library’s role in helping students to gain information literacy skills, and a few link the library to “the quality of the learning environment.” 152 Owusu-Ansah points out that the accreditors’ call for the library’s “direct participation in the education of students forced many libraries to reevaluate and address their place in the educational process.” 153 Thompson argues that, “Libraries are no longer seen, if they ever were, as isolated agencies
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Assessment of information literacy skills among first year students

Assessment of information literacy skills among first year students

We suggest that, rather than choosing one form of graduate capability assessment over the other, using the quiz and rubric in tandem offers more opportunities for learning and assessment. Other authors have indicated that students’ self- perceptions of their information literacy skills are particularly inaccurate, which might make them less likely to seek unprompted assistance (Dean & Cowley, 2009). Price and colleagues (2011) found that first year students initially demonstrated higher levels of confidence in their own information literacy skills than those in later year levels at university, but they revised their confidence upon the receipt of feedback in relation to their performance. Using online quizzes at the very beginning of first year may assist students in more accurately determining their capabilities in this area, and provide additional motivation for attending classes with face-to-face delivery of skills instruction, as well as the use of online materials. Rubric-based assessment that is embedded within a formative assessment process can then support students in their development of these skills, and ultimately reward them for exceeding standards and doing well.
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Teaching Emergent Literacy Skills to Students with Autism

Teaching Emergent Literacy Skills to Students with Autism

To this date, literacy instruction for most students with disabilities, including those with autism, has been focused on basic, functional reading vocabulary rather than constructing meaning (Katims, 2000; Mirenda, 2003). In addition, traditional phonics instruction which isolates phonemes and sounds without pictures or without a meaningful context makes it almost impossible for students with autism to demonstrate mastery, thus giving the perception that they are incapable of further literacy instruction (Mirenda, 2003). Recent literacy research (Au, Carroll, & Scheu, 2001) and federal mandates (NCLB) emphasize the importance of a comprehensive, balanced approach to reading instruction (teaching all five components) for all students. This balanced approach begins with emergent literacy skills and continues with phonics instruction.
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Electronic professional practice portfolios and digital
literacy skills in teacher education.

Electronic professional practice portfolios and digital literacy skills in teacher education.

Timetabled ICT sessions have been built into the curriculum including hands on introductory sessions to Moodle enabling trainees to complete some tasks with tutor support, helping to boost confidence, enhance learner motivation and promote independent learning. Additional support has been put in place to build trainees’ digital literacy skills (Ofsted, 2014) in the form of a ‘Skills for Success’ unit coordinated by a graduate intern. Trainee teachers can receive one to one ICT training sessions on using Moodle and how to build online portfolios. The University of Bolton Skills for Success Unit also offers Moodle online support via a discussion forum and academic development sessions are in place in the academic calendar.
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Information literacy skills of engineering students

Information literacy skills of engineering students

The respondents in the study were diploma-level engineering students who had undergone at least three semesters at a Malaysian college. Data were collected using a survey instrument adapted from Mittermeyer and triangulated using a citation analysis of student bibliographies in an essay assignment. The results of this study show that the respondents seriously lacked the necessary knowledge and skills to evaluate internet information, to identify the most efficient search strategy, to use scholarly resources, and to use information ethically. Most scholarly resources used were books in print format, while most non-scholarly resources referred to were in electronic format. This study implies the importance of information literacy assessment as the first step in improving students’ information skills. It also indicates the need to encourage students to use more scholarly electronic resources in their coursework. It is suggested that a larger sample of students be used in order to be more representative of the engineering student population. An intervention program should also be introduced to improve students’ information literacy skills. Keywords: Assessment; Information literacy skills; Engineering students; Citation analysis
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Assessing maths literacy skills in type 1 diabetic children and their caregivers

Assessing maths literacy skills in type 1 diabetic children and their caregivers

The goals of this study were to determine the level of mathematical skills in those type 1 diabetic children and their primary caregivers attending the paediatric out-patient diabetic clinics at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH) and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH). The aim was to ascertain if there were deficits in the maths literacy skills of our participants (relative to their highest grade achieved), and to establish if there was an association between the level of mathematical skill and degree of metabolic control in our participants (using the average HbA 1c value taken over the preceding year).
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Norming a VALUE rubric to assess graduate information literacy skills

Norming a VALUE rubric to assess graduate information literacy skills

The purpose of this project was to collaborate to test the utility of an information literacy rubric to assess the students’ information literacy skills. The main goal of the project was to determine whether an interdepartmental team of raters, once trained, would find a modified version of the information literacy VALUE rubric to be appropriate for graduate level work in the health sciences. Specifically, the project addressed whether the design of the VALUE rubric discriminates quality of student work for research-based assignments. The project also addressed whether the language of the rubric, including the criteria and performance levels, facilitates calibration among raters.
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Review of Financial Literacy Skills of Women across the World

Review of Financial Literacy Skills of Women across the World

The economic impact of life-events like divorce, death of spouse is more profound for women. After the death of spouse, the sufferings of women multiply. A US research by Hurd and Wise(1989)revealed that the probability of household poverty increases from less than 10 to more than 35 percent after death ofhusband. In case of single-parent families headed by women, women’s responsibility is higher. Better financial literacy skills and awareness regarding daily used financial concepts for example, saving, spending, borrowing, budgeting are required to take responsible decisions for a prosperous future. More generally, women’s life-expectancy is longer.The longer life suggests the need of successful financial planning to fight the rising cost, to meet the healthcare needs and maintaining the same standard of living in future.
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Authentic Learning: Enhancing Learners’ Academic Literacy Skills

Authentic Learning: Enhancing Learners’ Academic Literacy Skills

This is a qualitative research that explored the views of the participants about authentic learning tasks and activities in the academic literacy course. The study adopted seven ele- ments of authentic learning. The conduct of authentic learn- ing studies is guided by a number of elements that constitute authentic learning. Lombardi (2007, p. 3) proposes ten ele- ments of authentic learning. These include tasks and activ- ities that have “real world relevance, ill-defined problems, sustained investigation, multiple sources and perspective, collaboration, reflection, interdisciplinary perspectives, in- tegrated assessment, polished products and multiple inter- pretations and outcomes.” Herrington, Reeves and Oliver (2010) propose nine elements of authentic learning. These elements are authentic context, authentic task, expert per- formance, multiple perspective, collaboration, reflection, articulation, coaching, and scaffolding and assessment. The elements proposed by Herrintong et al. (2010) confirm the elements proposed by Lombardi (2007).
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