Multicultural classroom

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Teaching Horror Literature in a Multicultural Classroom

Teaching Horror Literature in a Multicultural Classroom

In this sense, Kaufman and Libby’s (2012) research dedicated to reading as “experience-taking” that can change beliefs and behavior of readers is especially relevant for learning outcomes in a multicultural classroom. Experience-taking presumes that the reader immerses himself or herself into the text “as though they were a particular character in the story world, adopting the character’s mind-set and perspective as the story progresses rather than orienting themselves as an observer or evaluator of the character” (2012, 2; also see Oatley 1999). In their study, they investigated how postponed disclosure of a character’s sexual orientation or race may impact experience-taking, and such issues are crucial in multicultural classrooms where the acceptance of Otherness must be the norm. Reading allows us to “live as many more lives and as many kinds of lives” (Hayakawa 1990, 144) as possible, owing to our mental simulation of the characters’ experiences which imply “new roles, relationships, personalities, motives, and actions” (Kaufman and Libby 2012, 17). Kaufman and Libby’s experiments “demonstrate that the effects of experience-taking can be harnessed and directed toward such positive ends as increasing civic engagement and reducing prejudice and stereotyping” (2012, 17), which is a crucial outcome of intercultural communication within the classroom context. Specifically, this implies using different (experiential rather than conceptual) methods in class, such as discussions, role-plays or written assignments, that require students to actively and consciously suppress their conceptions of themselves in order to simulate the character’s mind-set and their subjective experiences (Kaufman and Libby 2012, 15). 11
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Communicating In A Multicultural Classroom: A Study Of Students Nonverbal Behavior And Attitudes Toward Faculty Attire

Communicating In A Multicultural Classroom: A Study Of Students Nonverbal Behavior And Attitudes Toward Faculty Attire

As reported earlier, the respondents ―born in the United States‖ were more inclined to correlate a faculty member’s dress/attire with their level of expertise and professionalism. The culture in the United States has related personal appearance with factors such as intelligence and sociability. Conventional wisdom also tells us that others make judgments about people based on their appearance, including everything from hairstyle to body weight, clothing style to skin tone (O’Rourke, 2010). In addition, the United States is at a lower cultural contextual level than the countries represented in the survey as people ―born outside the United States‖. Low context cultures are less flexible than their high context counterparts. Cultural context is the pattern of physical cues, environmental stimuli, and implicit understanding that convey meaning between two members of the same culture (Bovee and Thill, 2008). Hence, the respondents from the United States may have formed early attitudes about how success and professionalism influence the judgments about the personal appearance of a person. A similar case is made for the results showing that the respondents ―born outside the United States‖ reported that they are more likely to judge a faculty member’s ability to communicate in the classroom setting effectively by their dress/attire. This reasoning, however, is contrary to how the same respondents judged a faculty member’s level of expertise. See Figure 3 for results.
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Whiter Shade of Pale: Making the Case for Jewish Presence in the Multicultural Classroom

Whiter Shade of Pale: Making the Case for Jewish Presence in the Multicultural Classroom

The first is lack of knowledge in the general population and the permeation of this deficiency. The second is misinformation which may be disseminated due to lack of knowledge and poor choice of resources. The biggest problem comes from people not even knowing they don’t know. (p. 50) It appears that, at least in the United States, the “fact that Jews are a minority is not widely acknowledged. Or, if they are acknowledged as a numerical minority, they are relegated to a status of somehow ‘not counting’ as a minority” (Langman, 1995, p. 2). Unfortunately, due to many reasons, such as bigotry, stereotyping, and internalized racism, this view is held by both Jews and non-Jews alike in the United States. It is for these reasons that American Jews need to be recognized as their own unique group that continues to battle various forms of discrimination and oppression (MacDonald-Dennis, 2006). A positive and productive way to achieve that goal is to bring the study of antisemitism into the multicultural and social justice university classroom.
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CRITICAL READING SKILL AND ITS IMPLICATION TO SPEAKING ABILITY IN MULTICULTURAL CLASSROOM

CRITICAL READING SKILL AND ITS IMPLICATION TO SPEAKING ABILITY IN MULTICULTURAL CLASSROOM

Reading is an inevitable activity to gain information. Through reading, students were able to deliver their opinion better and show better performance. It can be seen from the final examination score that most students achieved score >75. Meanwhile the bilingual used in classroom activity made the students easier to understand the learning instruction and learn better. Due to the technology today, many students learn English not only from books but also from music. In meant that even tough students feel comfortable when they use both English and Indonesia, students still have many alternatives to learn English.
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Teaching intercultural skills in the multicultural classroom

Teaching intercultural skills in the multicultural classroom

Student’s receptivity to the ExcelL program appeared varied, with a number of students, including focus group participants, expressing strong support for the relevance of ExcelL to the learning of International Human Resource Management. Course evaluation comments, however, indicated that students were divided on the relevance and suitability of the program to the course. Some students felt that activities were ‘worthless’ and they ‘felt childish’. Some of these comments were linked to a particular staff member, whose manner was regarded as ‘condescending’ by some students. Nevertheless, the reaction to introducing a behavioural based program into University curriculum has been recognised as generating some level of student resistance as it is contrary to normal classroom expectations of business students (Rynes, Quinn Trank, Lawson, & Iles, 2003). It appears as though the relevance of the program to IHRM could also have been better framed according to student feedback recorded in Table 4. The reaction to role plays appears divided (Table 4) with four students expressing they liked this aspect and two expressing that they did not like it. Role plays in training can generate mixed reactions (Smith, 1998), however further training of facilitators often helps to reduce negative reactions (Noe, 1999).
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MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION FOR A CHANGING WORLD

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION FOR A CHANGING WORLD

Multicultural Classroom: A multiculturally sensitive classroom provides every student with opportunities to achieve his or her potential. It allows students to understand and appreciate their own culture while recognizing its similarities and differences to other cultures and perspectives in society.

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Transforming Education for a Multicultural Society

Transforming Education for a Multicultural Society

Media, through media representations in film, television, music, advertising and other formats contribute to the way we see others and they in turn see us. Media literacy can be a powerful tool and an important component of the multicultural classroom, when students and teachers examine, challenge, confront, validate or refute the information contained in these depictions.. In other words, their own cultural upbringing made it difficult for them to recognize how those outside of that culture might think, act or feel.

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CHALLENGES FACED BY DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN TEACHING

CHALLENGES FACED BY DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN TEACHING

A classroom that is sensitive to cultural diversity and differences is essential for creating a learning environment conducive for students from varied backgrounds. Encourage students to interact and participate in classroom discussion and dialogue but recognize that the cultural background of some students may make them hesitant to be vocal in the classroom. A multicultural classroom provides the opportunity for students to enrich the classroom by bringing their multiple perspectives and backgrounds to a discussion of various issues and topics. However, the teacher should avoid singling out individual students as representative of their ethnic or cultural group. Stereotyping students fails to respect their individuality and makes broad general assumptions about their background and experiences.
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MULTICULTURAL EFFICACY OF PRESERVICE TEACHERS: A STUDY

MULTICULTURAL EFFICACY OF PRESERVICE TEACHERS: A STUDY

Diversity prevails in the education system. Diversity in the classroom consists of different learners. Teachers play an important role in dealing with such diversity. It is pivotal that pre- service teachers must be confident and possess the ability to cater to a multicultural classroom. It is imperative that pre-service teachers are effectively trained to meet the needs of diverse learners. In short high multicultural efficacy among pre- service teachers is needed. Do the preservice teachers possess the experience, attitude and multicultural efficacy towards teaching? Can they effectively implement multicultural strategies for equity pedagogy?The paper is an attempt to study it.The present study is a descriptive research of comparative type. The main goal of this type of research was to compare the Multicultural Efficacy on the basis of type of management and year- wise of the pre- service teachers. The sample consisted of 400 pre- service teachers from colleges of education. The Multicultural Efficacy Scale was prepared by Guyton, E. M., &Wesche, M. V was used for the present study.In the present study, two- stage sampling technique was used. ‘t’ test was used to compare the means scores and profile analysis to identify the dimensions of Multicultural efficacy.The study reveals that the Multicultural Efficacy of pre- service teachers of aided colleges of education is higher than that of unaided colleges of education. There is no statistically significant difference in the multicultural efficacy of F.Y.B.ED and S.Y.B.ED pre- service teachers. The result of the profiles analysis of aided and unaided colleges of education intersect across dimensions on the basis of type of management. The profiles of F.Y.B.ED and S.Y.B.ED are not equal and do not intersect across dimensions on the basis of year- wise.
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Mono-Cultural Practices In Multicultural Science Classroom

Mono-Cultural Practices In Multicultural Science Classroom

arrangements. There were sufficient number of benches but they are not well managed. There was not enough space for teachers to move inside the class to supervise the activities of the students. The walls inside the classroom were not well decorated but all classrooms in general and multicultural classroom in particular needs decoration of classroom from multicultural perspective. The classroom of my study school had neither the literature nor posters or pictures of different cultures decorated on the walls to give equal identity to all cultures. In terms of language there was lingual diversity in all classrooms but there were mostly monolingual teaching in all of the classes. This situation deprives the multi lingual students to gain education in their mother tongue. Even though peoples are not restricted to language for communication, language is of overarching importance because it is the fundamental medium through which ethnicity is transmitted and cultural identity is formed (Banks, 2006). Students and guardians had more interest in English as a language of instruction. But teachers were teaching all subjects except Nepali in English by translating into Nepali. This type of instructional pattern hinders the learning of students. The craze of
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Multicultural Society must be Defended?

Multicultural Society must be Defended?

The first exploration of orientalist citizenship focused on how it reinforced a conception of multicultural society as post-racial and anti-immigrant. By drawing attention to UKIP’s just-in-time citizens, I argued that an anti- essentialist severing of a fused racialized identity and support for immigra- tion partially occurred as racialized citizens assumed an orientalist position of excluding others. Second, I showed how Make Bradford British illustrated one way intercultural citizens have defined and defended a multicultural- ist conception of society. Of significance was how normalized intercultural citizens were demarcated from failed citizens in non-dichotomous terms to facilitate a more inclusive notion of cultural citizenship. Yet it was precisely this attempt at creating intercultural citizens and failed citizens as occupying dynamic subject positions, rather than mutually exclusive identities, that the intercultural citizen became a disciplining position from which orien- talist citizenship could gain a new expression. In a similar vein to UKIP’s just-in-time citizens, the normalization of intercultural citizens revealed how transformations in orientalist citizenship enable state racism to per- sist in situations where biological and culturally defined hierarchies become untenable. Just-in-time and intercultural citizens illustrate positions from which racialized citizens can constitute the legitimate occupants of society and terms of exclusion.
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Their View My View: A White Teacher s Quest to Understand His African-American Middle School Students Perceptions of Racism

Their View My View: A White Teacher s Quest to Understand His African-American Middle School Students Perceptions of Racism

scheduled. I had agreements from ten of fifteen students that they would participate in the study. I also offered drinks and sweets as an additional incentive for participation. After school, I went with recording equipment to my colleague’s room and discovered only four of my students had shown up. I was disappointed by this and wondered if I had overestimated the other students’ enthusiasm. To make matters worse, two of the students attending I had sent out earlier in the day with discipline referrals. They had not returned to class. I suspected they had not brought their referrals to the office; but, I decided not to ask them about this and allowed them to participate. Also, there was an additional student there who was not in my class. The students asked that she be allowed to stay and said she would just listen and not be a part of the interview. I thought this would detract from the formality of my research, but I allowed her to stay. As I later listened to the tape, it turned out that Ebonee did in fact participate, but I was glad for this as she was incredibly expressive and articulate. Even though she didn’t offer specific feedback about my class, her thoughts on racism and racism in the classroom were very insightful. Below is a presentation of the relevant points from the interview.
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EDUCATION IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY

EDUCATION IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY

It is the breadth of multicultural education which makes it such a profound change in the ways we think about education. Banks (1997b) describes the dimensions of multicultural education in five overlapping areas in which researchers and practitioners are involved. Content integration is the inclusion of materials, concepts, and values from a variety of cultures in teaching. Knowledge construction is the recognition that all knowledge is socially constructed, created in the minds of human beings to explain their experience and thus, can be challenged. Ideas that shape society do change.. Equity pedagogy is involved when teachers alter their teaching methods to accommodate the various cultural differences of diverse students to stimulate academic achievement. Prejudice reduction concerns, changing the students' attitudes towards differences of race and ethnicity teaching tolerance about religion, physical and mental abilities, and sexual preference. An empowering school culture is the dimension of multicultural education that enables the other four dimensions. Educators must examine the structures of education that impede learning and empower students and families from "diverse racial, ethnic, and gender groups”. The aim is to create schools that encourage the full development of all students. Multicultural education is about social change through education. It requires deep and critical thinking, imagination, and commitment to another tomorrow, inclusive of the wealth of all of our stories and peoples. It is another aspect of the continuous human journey toward justice and pushes us toward the fulfillment of the promises of democracy. It gives us new questions to ask and directions to follow to uncover human possibilities in the new millennium. (Greene (1995),)
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How they want it: A study on Chinese students’ preferred learning methods

How they want it: A study on Chinese students’ preferred learning methods

Paper Session 17: International and Exchange Education and Multicultural Competence Chair: Anita Mak. Symposium #7: Leading Fair Multicultural Health Care in the European Union[r]

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THE CHALLENGES OF TEACHING LEARNING OF ENGLISH  LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT IN INDIA

THE CHALLENGES OF TEACHING LEARNING OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT IN INDIA

Multicultural education deals with the ideals of social justice and education equality in which all students reach their full potential as learners and as socially aware and active beings, locally, nationally, and globally. It is an education that enables all learners regardless of their gender, ethnicity, race, culture, social class, religion, have an equal opportunity to learn at school. By applying this multicultural perspective in the practice of English language teaching and learning, the learners will acquire, attitude, knowledge, and skills needed to function within their own culture, mainstream culture and the global community. Therefore, it is important to improve multicultural awareness among students. Moreover, teachers should use content from diverse groups. This will enable the students to understand how knowledge in various disciplines is constructed. The teachers should develop positive intergroup attitudes and behaviours, and modify their teaching skills so that students from different racial, cultural, language, and social- class groups will experience equal educational opportunities. An education system should be such that it can create a new generation of individual who believe that all human beings are brothers and that difference of caste, religion, community have no significance.
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Multicultural Modes of Immigrants' Integration into the Host Society: Exploring the Proposition

Multicultural Modes of Immigrants' Integration into the Host Society: Exploring the Proposition

These hands-on multiculturalist activities have been particularly intense in the Mission neighbourhood, probably because the concentration of people whose professions—arts, literature, humanities—and attendant life orientations foster explorative, open-minded attitudes towards the world and the people in it, is higher here than elsewhere in the city. A lack of significant residential or economic competition among the resident groups has upheld the friendly coexistence of their members, and a low level of residential racial, ethnic, and sexual (gay vs. heterosexual) segregation has facilitated everyday contacts. These features of the Mission have, in turn, attracted a particular kind of people: people who are cosmopolitan or, as observers call them, “bohemian” in mind and spirit, whose individual characteristics, reciprocally, sustain the multicultural profile of the neighbourhood in which they live. As they engage in the everyday activities of their neighbourhood, its residents compose and re-compose over time their interests and practices into changing constellations, creating a variety of local (sub) cultural features: faces, pronunciations, sights, smells, and sounds.
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Multicultural project teams and their management

Multicultural project teams and their management

Prabhakar (2005) investigates various project leadership styles and tries to connect those approaches to the success of a project regardless of business type, funds, culture or geographic dispersion. In his research, he attempts to tackle issues such as the types of leadership which produce high project performance and the motion of switching between different leadership styles and its effect on the success of the project. The research was based on 153 projects across 28 countries. The study corresponded to multicultural and multidisciplinary settings. Prabhakar defines switch leadership as the skill of changing leadership styles from one to another in order to increase project performance. The author proves that by the project manager switching his or her leadership style from autocratic and task oriented to more consultative and people centred, projects achieve higher performance levels. However, leaders prefer to adopt autocratic leadership style. Furthermore, there appears to be a link between Transformational Leadership and the success of the project, where the leader is a constructive and encouraging member of the project team and respectful towards individuals. Transformational leaders develop relationships with the project team members by the use of interactive contacts and creating cultural connection to achieve set goals. As summarised by Prabhakar (2005): “Good leaders do inspire confidence in themselves, but a truly great leader inspires confidence within the people they lead to exceed their normal performance level”.
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A workshop exploring how intercultural competences can be incorporated within the curriculum

A workshop exploring how intercultural competences can be incorporated within the curriculum

A workshop exploring how cultural norms and values impact the multicultural group- work assessment process... A workshop: exploring how cultural norms and values impact the multicultural[r]

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The Complexities of Racism: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Racisms in the New World Order

The Complexities of Racism: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Racisms in the New World Order

On further reflection, it seems to me that both the “culturally tolerant” attitude and the “you must obey the local laws” attitude belie subtle forms of racism, and indeed, raise vital questions about the nature of a multicultural society. It seems to me both attitudes betray an unwillingness to engage members of other cultures in discussion, even when the practice being discussed (physical discipline of children) is hardly a practice foreign to the dominant Anglo- Australian culture, and has been subject to intense debate within this dominant culture. There seems to be a kind of Orientalism (Said, 1978) occurring here, where a common practice, developed for a common end (the development of one’s children) can no longer be commonly discussed due to a barrier called “culture.” The teacher mentioned in the example above would not have hesitated to share her concerns with a parent from her own culture, yet believed that these concerns could not be attended to by a parent from a different culture because somehow this thing called “culture” would convince this parent that concerns about the safety of the discipline practice were irrelevant. (It may be overstating the case a bit, but it almost seemed as though this teacher were assuming that “culture” would prevent a parent from caring about their child). The same applies to the case mentioned above of the child protection officer (me). I also assumed too quickly that the family would not be willing to discuss their practice with me due to this inhibition called “culture.” Yet, there were a number of questions I could have asked had I not begun from an assumption that this family would not be willing to talk to me; technical questions such as, whether they were aware that using an implement to hit a diminishes the amount of control one has over the impact of the strike, and may result in non-intentional injury; or more broad ranging questions such as how the children would not notice who was holding the implement, and still associate punishment with that person’s hands (as the family had asserted the “hands give love”).
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Ways of Being a Multicultural Church: An Evaluation of Multicultural Church Models in the Baptist Union of Victoria.

Ways of Being a Multicultural Church: An Evaluation of Multicultural Church Models in the Baptist Union of Victoria.

This research followed a qualitative research method in order to uncover the shape of different types of multicultural churches and offer a critique based on their experience. ‘Qualitative research is a particular tradition in the social sciences that fundamentally depends on watching people in their own territory and interacting with them in their own language, on their own terms.’ 36 This approach was considered the most appropriate for examining and evaluating models of multicultural church in the BUV. Following the Handbook of Qualitative Research methods, 37 I built up case studies, and then developed theories based on the data I collected. Data was collected from four different churches representing four different models of multicultural church. Case studies for each model were constructed from in-depth interviews with pastors and a focus group from each church. I used the same question guide (see Appendix 2) for the four focus groups and seven individual interviews which yielded more than enough useful data for analysis. I used a highlighter and marked the key ideas that I had gathered from the focus group and key leaders. This enabled me to identify emerging themes and findings from the raw data.
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