Substance abuse treatment

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The comparative effectiveness of Integrated treatment for Substance abuse and Partner violence (I StoP) and substance abuse treatment alone: a randomized controlled trial

The comparative effectiveness of Integrated treatment for Substance abuse and Partner violence (I StoP) and substance abuse treatment alone: a randomized controlled trial

Because treatment for alcohol use disorders is effective in reducing IPV perpetration in alcohol abusing patients referred for substance use treatment whereas IPV treat- ment alone is not, several researchers called for integrat- ing IPV and substance abuse treatment (e.g., [38-41]). However, to date, only one randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been carried out on the effectiveness of such an integrated treatment. [42] conducted a pilot study that compared the effectiveness of a combined alcohol dependence / domestic violence group therapy based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to a 12-step facilita- tion group that did not address partner violence. Partici- pants who received the combined treatment abstained significantly more days from alcohol than participants in the 12-step facilitation group and there was a trend for participants in the combined treatment to engage in less frequent IPV than participants in the 12-step group. However, since there were differences in days of abstin- ence between both conditions and alcohol use is possibly causally related to IPV perpetration, it is necessary to control for days of abstinence when assessing differences between treatments in IPV perpetration. Further, in [42]’s study the treatments for substance abuse in both conditions differed from one another (i.e., CBT vs. 12- step approach). Therefore, it was not possible to deter- mine whether reductions in IPV were attributable to the different treatment of substance abuse or to the focus on IPV in the combined treatment. Also, some participants had no actual intimate relationship. Although these par- ticipants may benefit from the treatment in future rela- tionships, it is not possible to measure reductions in IPV perpetration when no partner is present. In addition, only participants who were (also) diagnosed with alcohol dependence were included, whereas research has dem- onstrated a relationship between use of cocaine and can- nabis and IPV perpetration as well. Besides, only men were included whereas a substantial proportion of the IPV perpetrators consist of women [43,44].
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A national study of the substance abuse treatment workforce $

A national study of the substance abuse treatment workforce $

This study’s purpose is to gain a current perspective on the substance abuse treatment field’s workforce. The data are from the Retrospective Study of treatment professionals designed to document how the Treatment Improvement Protocols published by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment have influenced the implementation of best practices. The Retrospective Study consisted of a two-wave cross- sectional survey with telephone follow-up. Data for this study were from demographic information on Wave 1 study participants, which had a response rate of 80.1% (N = 3,267). The results of the study showed that most treatment professionals are White (84.5%) and middle-aged (i.e., between 40 and 55 years old) and slightly more are female (50.5.0%) than male (49.5%). Treatment professionals tend to enter the field and stay in it, and almost 80.0% of respondents possess a bachelor’s degree or higher. In addition, most treatment professionals are licensed or certified and treat clients from different racial and ethnic backgrounds than themselves. Implications for the provision of treatment services are discussed. D 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
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Administrators - Family Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment

Administrators - Family Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment

Level 2: Family Education and Participation At this level, educational opportunities, informa- tion, and informal referrals are presented to the general public and potential clients and families to learn about the role of families in the sub- stance abuse treatment process. However, as with Level 1, Level 2 substance abuse treatment pro- grams generally lack the financial and human resources to provide direct services to family members. Although some educational seminars may be offered, they are not mandatory for clients and families as part of the formal substance abuse treatment program.
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Cost-Effectiveness of Inpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

Cost-Effectiveness of Inpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

This article analyzes the cost-effectiveness of inpatient substance abuse treatment, using readmission rates as the outcome measure.. Our goal is to identify the characteristics of inpat[r]

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The Effects of Consolidating Law Enforcement and Substance Abuse Treatment

The Effects of Consolidating Law Enforcement and Substance Abuse Treatment

Offenders who are referred to RSAT programming are either parole or court mandated and have a Texas Christian University Drug Screen (TCUDS) score of three or higher. x Both the state prison and probation treatment facilities use this drug screen instrument, which is evidence- based. The Department of Corrections has also invested state and federal funds to operate ten facilities statewide, which provide residential substance abuse treatment to incarcerated and community offenders. The six-month program, which is based upon the SAMSHA-created xi Therapeutic Community Model, targets high risk, high needs offenders – such as those in the Coastal RSAT program – with a history of substance abuse as crime producing behavior leading to correctional supervision. xii
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Issues of LGBTQ in Substance Abuse Treatment for Social Workers

Issues of LGBTQ in Substance Abuse Treatment for Social Workers

legitimacy of their way of life. Substance abuse treatment providers should understand that the gay community possesses common knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral patterns and has its own legacy, argot, folklore, heritage, and history. Gay culture is different in the degree to which it is submerged within other cultures and in the way that these cultures tend to affect it. LGBT people’s behavior is still stigmatized, and because there is usually no way of identifying LGBT people apart from their own disclosure or identification with gay culture, gay culture is essentially hidden in the larger community. In contrast to how members of ethnic cultures are marginalized, LGBT individuals may receive disapproval and censure from those whom they most trust and rely on—parents, relatives, religious leaders, teachers, and friends. Most members of ethnic minorities can escape discrimination by returning to a supportive family or neighborhood. This is not always true for LGBT persons. When they are growing up, their positive role models are not easy to identify. This isolation sets LGBT minority members apart from ethnic minor- ity group members who are usually in close proximity to other members. The LGBT culture is one that is not developed, taught, or
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Substance Abuse Treatment and LGBT Cultural Competence

Substance Abuse Treatment and LGBT Cultural Competence

RCD’s alliance-building process involves both LGBT and non-LGBT community groups. They include representatives from the faith community (Cathedral of Hope—Metropolitan Community Church; Potter’s House—Transformation Treatment Center), ethnic groups (African-American Health Coalition, Dallas Intertribal Center, La Sima Foundation), volunteer-based recovery programs (Alcoholics Anonymous), substance abuse treatment councils (Greater Dallas Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse), emergency temporary shelters (Austin Street Shelter, Welcome House, Inc., Johnnie’s Manor), drug intervention pro- grams (Ethel Daniels Foundation, Inc., Oak Lawn Counseling Services), aftercare programs (Community Alcohol and Drug After Care Program, New Place, Inc.), public health programs (Dallas County Health and Human Services, Parkland Health & Hospital System), veterans’ organizations (Veteran Affairs—North Texas Health Care System), and non-LGBT community groups (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, PFLAG Dallas).
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What are the correlates of substance abuse treatment counselor salaries?

What are the correlates of substance abuse treatment counselor salaries?

This article identifies and measures the key correlates of substance abuse treatment (SAT) counselor salaries. The data come from the 2002–2003 wave of the National Treatment Center Study that consists of approximately 1,500 full-time counselors from nationally representative samples of public and private SAT facilities. We used interval regression models to estimate the relationship between annual salary and numerous counselor and organizational characteristics. We found that counselor characteristics associated with annual salary include education, tenure in the SAT field, licensure, race, recovery status, and administrative responsibilities above and beyond duties as a full-time counselor. Organizational characteristics associated with counselor salary include accreditation status, hospital ownership, and the population density of the county where the facility is located. Taken together, these factors explain approximately 50% of the total variation in SAT counselor salaries. D 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Access to Substance Abuse Treatment in Child Welfare

Access to Substance Abuse Treatment in Child Welfare

A classic experiment was conducted. Research participants are custodial parents with cases opened on or after April 28, 2000 in Chicago and suburban Cook County. To qualify for the project, substance abusing parents were referred to the Juvenile Court Assessment Project (JCAP) at the time of their temporary custody hearing or at any time within 90 days subsequent to the hearing. JCAP staff assessed the parents referred by the Court or child welfare workers and made an initial treatment recommendation and referral for services. Once it had been determined that substance abuse was an issue, families were randomly assigned to either the control or experimental group. Members of the experimental group were referred to a Recovery Coach. Recovery Coaches were expected to meet the substance abusing parents within 48 hours. The control group received the existing package of substance abuse treatment services without a Recovery Coach. As of March 31, 2003, 532 parents were participating in this five-year waiver project: 164 parents in the control group and 368 parents in the experimental group. Informed consent was necessary to access the substance abuse treatment records of these parents. Of the 534 cases, 200 signed the letter of informed consent (148 experimental group, 52 control group).
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Case Management and Substance Abuse Treatment (Revised)

Case Management and Substance Abuse Treatment (Revised)

Generalist approaches to working with substance-abusing clients have taken several forms. Case managers in the central intake facility of a large metropolitan area performed the core functions of case management, linking clients with area substance abuse treatment and other human service providers. These case managers had access to funds for purchasing treatment services, thereby drastically reducing waiting periods for these services (Bokos et al., 1993). Another example of a generalist model is Providence, Rhode Island’s Project Connect, a family-centered, community-based intervention program designed to address the problems of substance abuse among high-risk families in the child welfare system. Staff members provide intensive home-based counseling services and work with families to obtain other services they may need, including safe and affordable housing and adequate health care.
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Why Meditation is successful in Substance abuse treatment. Mediation paired with substance abuse treatment has been around since 1982 when the

Why Meditation is successful in Substance abuse treatment. Mediation paired with substance abuse treatment has been around since 1982 when the

Mediation paired with substance abuse treatment has been around since 1982 when the Betty Ford center opened. Similar to the Ford clinic, many rehabilitation centers teach addicts the methods of meditating to show them that they have control of their own lives and give them something to rely on instead of relapsing back into old habits. Many former addicts feel like they are getting a new “high” when they learn to meditate and there is good reason as I will show you in my research. Neurologists have found that the meditation actually does change the brain chemistry in many different ways.
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Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy (Revised)

Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy (Revised)

Training in the boundaries related to the therapist’s or counselor’s self-disclosure is an integral part of any treatment provider’s edu- cation. Addiction counselors in recovery them- selves are trained to recognize the importance of choosing to self-disclose their own addiction histories, and to use supervision appropriately to decide when and what to disclose. An often- used guide for self-disclosure is to consider the reason for revealing personal addiction history to the client, asking the question, “What is the purpose of the revelation? To assist the client in recovery or for my own personal needs?” Many people who have been in recovery for some time and who have experience in self-help groups have become paraprofessional or pro- fessional treatment providers. Clients, it should be emphasized, must be credited and acknowl- edged for their ability to effect change in their own lives so that they might lay claim to their own change. It is common for substance abuse treatment counselors to disclose information about their own experiences with recovery. Clients in substance abuse treatment often have some previous contact with self-help groups, where people seek help from other recovering people. As a result, clients usually feel comfort- able with the counselors’ self-disclosure. The practice of sharing personal history receives much less emphasis in family therapy, in part because of the influence of a psychoana- lytic tradition in family therapy. For the family therapist, self-disclosure is not as integral a part of the therapeutic process. It is down- played because it takes the focus of therapy off of the family. (More recent post-modern thera- pies such as narrative therapy and collaborative language systems emphasize the meaning of language and the subjectivity of truth. The therapist’s talking about personal experiences to gain some shared truth with the client(s) is part of the process. “Truth” is co-created between therapist and client, so sharing is natural and represents what the client per- ceives and understands, and the therapist
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Substance Abuse Treatment Needs, Capacity and Costs

Substance Abuse Treatment Needs, Capacity and Costs

This is the eighth in a series of substance abuse treatment reports prepared by the Bureau of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Previous studies analyzed substance abuse treatment data for 1996, and 1998 through 2003. This report summarizes data from calendar year 2004 on alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) treatment services in the state of Wisconsin. Relevant data were taken from the Human Services Reporting System (HSRS) and from a separate county treatment survey of agencies under s. 51.42, Wis. Stats. Substance abuse treatment covered by Medicaid and private insurance sources is estimated but not fully covered in this study.
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Substance Abuse Treatment Task Force Final Report

Substance Abuse Treatment Task Force Final Report

“ In FY 1999/2000, the Office of Juvenile Services was the only juvenile justice agency that had a budget for juvenile substance abuse treatment. Two percent of the Office of Juvenile Services budget for youth rehabilitation facilities was spent on substance abuse treatment. Almost half of these funds were from federal sources (i.e., grant money) that will potentially disappear in the near future. In addition to the money in the Office of Juvenile Services for substance abuse treatment, juvenile offenders can access other state funds for treatment and offenders who are Medicaid eligible may also receive services through Medicaid.
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Exploring the Role of Social Workers in Substance Abuse Treatment

Exploring the Role of Social Workers in Substance Abuse Treatment

Group counseling. Annapoorna (2014) argued that group intervention promotes a rewarding benefit that helps clients to experience recovery with others, reduce a sense of isolation, and increases the efficacy of recovery culture. Wells et al. (2013) argue that group counseling is suitable for addressing problems associated with substance abuse, such as anxiety, anger, depression, isolation, and shame. Huong Nguyen & Meek, (2015) maintained that group counseling emphasizes the interpersonal approach, which assists clients to resolve problems and avoid harmful substance addiction lifestyle. Sarra et al., (2015), argue that group counseling provides the social worker with insights and information to enhance personal skills, manage and facilitate a group in the substance abuse treatment. Forde & Lynch (2014) show that formal therapy groups can enrich their members with awareness and direction and promotion of encouragement, stabilization, and care.
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Substance Abuse Treatment for Women

Substance Abuse Treatment for Women

A study of 1,411 women born between 1934 and 1974 found that women who experienced any type of sexual abuse in childhood were more likely than those who were not abused to report drug or alcohol dependence as adults. In fact, childhood sexual abuse was associated more strongly with drug or alcohol dependence than with any other psychiatric disorder. This study is based on data from women in the general population, as opposed to clinical studies of women in treatment (Kendler et al. 2000). Clinical studies have documented that up to 75 percent of women in substance abuse treatment have a history of physical and/or sexual abuse (Ouimette et al. 2000; Teusch 1997). Earlier studies have shown that women who abuse substances are estimated to have a 30- to 59-percent rate of current PTSD (Najavits et al. 1998), which is higher than the rate in men who abuse substances (CSAT 2005a). A history of sexual and/or physical abuse puts women at risk for psychiatric hospitalization (Carmen 1995), depression (Herman 1997; Ross-Durow and Boyd 2000), eating disorders (Curtis et al. 2005; Janes 1994; Miller 1994; Smolak and Murnen 2001), and self-inflicted injury (Dallam 1997; Haswell and Graham 1996; Miller and Guidry 2001). See also TIP 36 Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Child Abuse and Neglect Issues (CSAT 2000b).
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Comprehensive Case Management for Substance Abuse Treatment

Comprehensive Case Management for Substance Abuse Treatment

The case manager should address the needs of clients released from institutions in order of importance. The first priority is immediate stability, which can be facilitated by safe housing, access to either primary substance abuse treatment or aftercare, and social networks that facilitate positive behavior. Second, the case manager should either provide or make referral to sources of skills training, since individuals who have served lengthy sentences will likely need either habilitation or rehabilitation training in the areas of job searches, interactions with non-offender social groups, and problem-solving strategies. Third, the case manager should train or find training in setting and accomplishing short- and long-term goals. Incarceration often leads offenders to believe that the locus for control of their lives lies totally with other persons or institutions. While goal-setting is important to any client group, it is particularly important to clients who have had most basic needs provided for them. Ideally, the case manager will begin providing these services several weeks or months before a scheduled release, then follow the offender into the community. Lastly, the case manager can advocate for the offender both in the treatment environment and the criminal justice system.
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PrEP in substance abuse treatment: a qualitative study of treatment provider perspectives

PrEP in substance abuse treatment: a qualitative study of treatment provider perspectives

Providers’ overwhelming support of conducting PrEP research trials on site and engaging their clients in trials may be an artifact of the sampling frame being CTN- affiliated programs. All of the programs are currently, or have in the past participated in clinical, behavioral and in many cases, pharmacological research through the CTN. Therefore, these programs in particular have a positive orientation toward research collaboration so this may not represent all substance use treatment programs in New York City or in the United States. This study suggests that more research ought to be done prior to rolling out PrEP in substance abuse treatment programs. PrEP research should focus on testing implementation strategies include structural interventions in order to build agency capacity to sustain PrEP. Interventions aimed at enhancing link- ages to PrEP prescribers ought to be leveraged for those programs that lack the capacity to do so.
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Substance Abuse Treatment: Gone Astray in the Service Array?

Substance Abuse Treatment: Gone Astray in the Service Array?

• How are child welfare/treatment data and outcomes connected to the State level assessment of need for substance abuse treatment and capacity to serve child welfare clients. • How ar[r]

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Medical marijuana users in substance abuse treatment

Medical marijuana users in substance abuse treatment

Treatment staff identified 18 clients as medical mari- juana users engaged in treatment at the beginning of the study. Staff were aware of clients ’ medical marijuana use and had documented it in clients ’ files. While the identities of these clients were never shared with the researcher, they were confirmed by multiple staff on repeated occasions. Though this substantially weakens the study ’ s sampling protocol, no other option is cur- rently available. Existing substance abuse treatment data systems do not record the status of a client as a medical marijuana user, so there is no independent way to estab- lish who is a medical marijuana user in treatment and who is not other than through multiple substantiations from program staff. Of the initial set of 18 one died dur- ing the course of treatment and was excluded. Cause of death could not be determined from data collected, as client data files were not included in the study. Simi- larly, specific diagnoses could not be ascertained. In order to strengthen the research design, only those cli- ents receiving outpatient drug free treatment in the county ’ s substance abuse treatment program were included ("drug free ” means they did not participate in an opiate maintenance or titration program). This resulted in the exclusion of one residential treatment client and three day treatment clients, leaving an experi- mental group size of 13. While including the day treat- ment and residential treatment clients would have increased the sample size, the significant variation in treatment protocols weakened the comparison to non- medical marijuana users. Admission dates for the 13 medical marijuana using clients were used as the basis for generating comparative data. Since they all indicated marijuana or methamphetamine as their primary drug of choice, the comparison group was limited to those treatment admissions where marijuana or methampheta- mine was noted as the primary drug. In order to gener- ate the comparison data set, county level reports on all
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