traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)

Top PDF traditional ecological knowledge (TEK):

Roles of Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Biodiversity Conservation

Roles of Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Biodiversity Conservation

Indigenous peoples are actively engaged as partners in biodiversity conservation and biodiversity inhabit local areas. They have a broad knowledge base of the behavior of complex ecological systems in their own localities with a historical continuity of resource-use practices. Management of natural resources in the form of indigenous/ traditional technical knowledge is called “Traditional Ecological Knowledge”. Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is a cumulative body of knowledge about the relationships living things (including people) have with each other and with their environment, which is handed down across generations through cultural transmission. Traditional ecological knowledge recognized as complementary and equivalent to scientific knowledge has increased its relevance globally. Traditional ecological knowledge is relevant for the maintenance and sustainable use of biodiversity. Maintenance of biodiversity includes the worldview and religious philosophy of indigenous peoples to develop a new environmental ethics and traditional practices of natural resource management tested on-site for many generations. However, sustainable utilization of biodiversity by TEK includes customary use of biological resources in accordance with traditional cultural practices. The roles of TEK for biodiversity conservation is considered at several levels such as traditional knowledge of animals, plants, soils and landscape for the sustainable use of resources; traditional resources management system with an appropriate set of tools, techniques and practices; social institutions or organization for coordination, co- operation, rule-making and rule enforcement and finally, environmental perception and gives meaning to social relations. Moreover, the application and effects of TEK on conservation and ecology are for ethnoecology, population ecology and species interaction and forest management. Beside these roles and integrating of TEK for biodiversity conservation, we recommend that: biodiversity managers and western scientists should be directly connected with knowledge holders and, communication styles should be understood, a foundation of trust to work should be established, and mutual benefits or incentives from knowledge sharing to collaborate biodiversity conservation should identified.
Show more

7 Read more

Local Knowledge for Global Actions:  The role of traditional ecological knowledge in climate change adaptation

Local Knowledge for Global Actions: The role of traditional ecological knowledge in climate change adaptation

Email of All Authors: na17506@shibaura-it.ac.jp, nakamu-h@shibaura-it.ac.jp Tel of 1 st Author:+60127767871 Abstract The scale of climate change put indigenous people at higher risk than the others. Nonetheless, due to their intimate knowledge of their land, traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) held by the indigenous peoples may be the key to combating climate change. This article aims to explain the role that TEK plays in adapting to climate change. Document review included grey literature alongside peer-reviewed literature and project websites related to indigenous knowledge in climate change adaptation. The findings show that TEK not only helps indigenous people cope with environmental and climate pressures, but the knowledge system fosters resilience of socio-ecological systems.
Show more

7 Read more

Using Traditional Ecological Knowledge to Adapt to Climate Change in Interior Sarawak

Using Traditional Ecological Knowledge to Adapt to Climate Change in Interior Sarawak

Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v4i11.1716 1.0 Introduction The survival of the indigenous Simeulueans in Sumatra and the Moken sea gipsies in Surin Islands from the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004, stole the public attention over the last few years and sparked a new interest to the concept of indigenous knowledge. Both cases showcase how the indigenous communities survive the catastrophe events and deal with the challenging environmental situations using their century-old knowledge, the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) (Meyers & Watson, 2008; Arunotai, 2008). Most research discussed TEK in the context of natural resource management (e.g., Houde, 2007, Halim et al., 2012), but now there are efforts to include this knowledge in the climate change context (Vinyeta & Lynn, 2013). More notably, the Paris Agreement has recognised indigenous people and their traditional system as part of the solution to climate change. The insight is valuable to foster adaptation and resilience during calamities that it strengthens the community capacity to deal with any disturbance.
Show more

7 Read more

The use of traditional ecological knowledge in forest management: an example from India

The use of traditional ecological knowledge in forest management: an example from India

ABSTRACT. Many forest communities possess considerable knowledge of the natural resources they use. Such knowledge can potentially inform scientific approaches to management, either as a source of baseline data to fill information gaps that cannot otherwise be addressed or to provide alternative management approaches from which scientists and managers might learn. In general, however, little attention has been given to the relevance of quantitative forms of such knowledge for resource management. Much discussion has focused on the integration of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into management, but less attention has been paid to identifying specific areas where it is most useful and where it may be most problematic. We contrasted scientific data with information from TEK in the context of a threat to the sustainable harvesting of a nontimber forest product (NTFP) of livelihood importance in southern India, specifically, a fruit tree infected by mistletoe. The efficiency of deriving information from NTFP harvesters compared to scientific field studies was assessed. We further evaluated the potential of TEK to provide novel solutions to the management problem in question, the degree to which TEK could provide quantitative information, and the biases that might be associated with information derived from TEK. TEK complemented previously gathered ecological data by providing concordant and additional information, but also contradicted some results obtained using a scientific approach. TEK also gave a longer-term perspective with regard to NTFP harvesting patterns. Combining information on historical and current harvesting trends for the NTFP with official data suggests that current assessments of sustainability may be inaccurate and that the use of diverse information sources may provide an effective approach to assessing the status of harvested resources.
Show more

20 Read more

The Relevance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge for

Modern Management of Coral Reef Fisheries in Melanesia

The Relevance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Modern Management of Coral Reef Fisheries in Melanesia

Abstract - Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) has received great attention in respect to coral reef associated fisheries as a way to adapt modern management strategies to local environmental and cultural conditions. We analysed the social and cultural roles of TEK for resource management in traditional Melanesian communities in New Caledonia. A multidisciplinary survey of customary marine tenure and fishing regulations on Ouvéa, a raised limestone island in New Caledonia, was carried out in 2006. Informants from the main chiefdoms and clans were questioned about past and present fishing activities, maritime territory rights, taboo areas and place names, customary authority, socio-cultural practices and belief related to marine resources, and vernacular knowledge and taxonomy of marine organisms. Results showed that customary fishing rules were primarily related to cultural events and social organization rather than to ecological patterns or economic interests. The relationships between TEK, population needs and uses of the environment were still strong, but have changed since the 1860s. An unquantifiable loss of indigenous knowledge has also occurred.
Show more

5 Read more

Folklore and traditional ecological knowledge of geckos in Southern Portugal: implications for conservation and science

Folklore and traditional ecological knowledge of geckos in Southern Portugal: implications for conservation and science

Luis MP Ceríaco 1,2* , Mariana P Marques 2 , Natália C Madeira 2 , Carlos M Vila-Viçosa 3 and Paula Mendes 3 Abstract Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and folklore are repositories of large amounts of information about the natural world. Ideas, perceptions and empirical data held by human communities regarding local species are important sources which enable new scientific discoveries to be made, as well as offering the potential to solve a number of conservation problems. We documented the gecko-related folklore and TEK of the people of southern Portugal, with the particular aim of understanding the main ideas relating to gecko biology and ecology. Our results suggest that local knowledge of gecko ecology and biology is both accurate and relevant. As a result of information provided by local inhabitants, knowledge of the current geographic distribution of Hemidactylus turcicus was expanded, with its presence reported in nine new locations. It was also discovered that locals still have some misconceptions of geckos as poisonous and carriers of dermatological diseases. The presence of these ideas has led the population to a fear of and aversion to geckos, resulting in direct persecution being one of the major conservation problems facing these animals. It is essential, from both a scientific and conservationist
Show more

10 Read more

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Sustainable Food Sourcing: Dayutang Village, Hani Rice Terraces

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Sustainable Food Sourcing: Dayutang Village, Hani Rice Terraces

Reflecting on the importance of dynamic agricultural management techniques in addressing climate change and food security, this paper examines the Hani rice terraces of southern Yunnan as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS). It identifies local inhabitants’ traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) as a key source of their success, and uses research conducted in Dayutang Village, Yuanyang County from May 4- June 2, 2015 through participative observation and guided conversation to explore the role of Hani TEK in sustainable food sourcing around the village. The TEK used in food sourcing in Dayutang is shown not only to provide villagers with stable and diverse diets, but also to connect various ecological niches into a resilient whole. This paper then elaborates upon the impact of modern changes upon this food sourcing system, and identifies the emergence of a new ‘hybrid’ form of TEK. Discussing TEK as a complex, adaptive knowledge system, it recognizes some key methodological difficulties of approaching it through the reductionist research paradigm. Finally, it concludes by considering the implications of the complexity and epistemological foundation of TEK on future research
Show more

39 Read more

The UN local communities and Indigenous peoples' platform: A traditional ecological knowledge-based evaluation

The UN local communities and Indigenous peoples' platform: A traditional ecological knowledge-based evaluation

Edited by Anita Engels, Domain Editor, and Mike Hulme, Editor-in-Chief This review evaluates the potential of the proposed local communities and Indige- nous peoples ’ platform to effectively engage traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) for climate policy. Specifically, we assess the platform's potential to enable greater representation and participation of Indigenous peoples (IPs) within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). An ana- lytical framework based on the extensive TEK and environmental management lit- erature is developed, with a set of criteria identified against which to evaluate the platform. We find that although the process of designing the platform appears to be inclusive of Indigenous views, the structure itself does not recognize the roles that unequal power relations and colonialism play in marginalizing IPs. Limited atten- tion is paid to the institutional barriers within the UNFCCC and the drawbacks of pursuing knowledge “integration” as an end in itself. Based on this, recommenda- tions for improving the platform structure are put forward including using a rights- based framing, giving greater decision-making power to IPs, and developing mechanisms to ensure the holistic integrity of TEK and build the overall resilience of climate mitigation and adaptation systems.
Show more

11 Read more

Inuit Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Subsistence Hunting and Adaptation to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

Inuit Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Subsistence Hunting and Adaptation to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

Subsistence Hunting and Adaptation to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic Tristan Pearce, 1 James Ford, 2 Ashlee Cunsolo Willox 3 and Barry Smit 4 (Received 18 November 2013; accepted in revised form 7 August 2014) ABSTRACT. This paper examines the role of Inuit traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in adaptation to climate change in the Canadian Arctic. It focuses on Inuit relationships with the Arctic environment, including hunting knowledge and land skills, and examines their roles in adaptation to biophysical changes that affect subsistence hunting. In several instances, TEK underpins competency in subsistence and adaptations to changing conditions, which includes flexibility with regard to seasonal cycles of hunting and resource use, hazard avoidance through detailed knowledge of the environment and understanding of ecosystem processes, and emergency preparedness, e.g., knowing what supplies to take when traveling and how to respond in emergency situations. Despite the documented importance of TEK in adaptation and in maintaining a level of competency in subsistence, the relationships between TEK and adaptation to climate change are not well defined in the scholarly literature.
Show more

13 Read more

Building an Indigenous Traditional Ecological Knowledge Initiative at a Research University: Decolonization Notes from the Field

Building an Indigenous Traditional Ecological Knowledge Initiative at a Research University: Decolonization Notes from the Field

Sustainability Education, we return to an understanding of traditional ecological knowledge learned in both of our Tribal communities: that our traditional cultures hold within them teachings that can sustain humans’ ability to life and thrive on Mother Earth. Indigenous traditional ecological knowledge represents a unique trusted relationship with the natural world that is a cultural, spiritual and reciprocal endeavor (Whyte, 2013; Turner, Ignace, & Ignace, 2000). Yet, too often, we see traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) dismissed, ignored, or trivialized, with perhaps only marginal inclusion in university curricula. We view this as highly problematic for the future of sustainability education, and we encourage all sustainability educators to respectfully seek ways to place TEK at the center of curricular discussions. An additional problem we note, and discuss below, is that even when faculty and students who do meaningfully engage with traditional ecological knowledge and partnerships with Tribal peoples, too often we fall victim to the “silo effect” prominent in universities, and we work in isolation from one another. We fail to build the community needed on our campus that could truly transform our ability to decolonize education, and in doing so make a profound contribution to sustainability education. In this paper, we discuss our work to build an initiative that can help us address these interwoven problems.
Show more

11 Read more

Stepping out of our paradigm: a path for the integration of scientific and traditional ecological knowledge in natural resource management

Stepping out of our paradigm: a path for the integration of scientific and traditional ecological knowledge in natural resource management

Abstract The call for the integration of scientific and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in natural resource and environment management (NREM) is now stronger than ever. Australian central and state governments have indicated that “knowledge integration” in NREM is a way to pursue social equity and enhance sustainability. Yet a clear path for integrating knowledge systems on the ground is still to be developed, which often hinders the dialogue between holders of different knowledge systems. In this paper we argue that the integration of knowledge systems in NREM should be pursued at the level of the knowledge production process and with the involvement of knowledge holders. We are aware that integrating TEK and scientific knowledge requires a change of social values. To achieve this change, we argue that both scientific and traditional ecological knowledge holders need to step out of their own paradigms and meet each other half way.
Show more

5 Read more

Evaluating indices of traditional ecological knowledge: a methodological contribution

Evaluating indices of traditional ecological knowledge: a methodological contribution

a sample that lives permanently in the village might raise the estimates of individual's practical knowledge. We conclude with two suggestions to improve future research. First, we need further studies assessing the relia- bility of different methods. Researchers have used many quantitative methods to collect data and construct indices of traditional ecological knowledge, but they have not paid enough attention to the reliability of the various methods used. To develop a metric of individual tradi- tional ecological knowledge that can be used in cross-cul- tural research, we need to assess the reliability of methods of data collection. Second, we recommend the develop- ment of a comprehensive measure of traditional ecologi- cal knowledge. Traditional ecological knowledge is a complex construct, so developing a comprehensive meas- ure of traditional ecological knowledge will require the use of a variety of methods to collect data on knowledge, skills, and beliefs of different fields of ecological knowl- edge.
Show more

9 Read more

Weaving Traditional Ecological Knowledge into the Restoration of Basketry Plants

Weaving Traditional Ecological Knowledge into the Restoration of Basketry Plants

D aniela S hebitz Abstract This paper focuses on the benefits of incorporating traditional ecological knowledge into the field of ecological restoration. Case studies on indigenous use of sweetgrass in New York State, U.S.A (Haudenosaunee Nation), and beargrass in Washington State, U.S.A (Quinault and Skokomish Nations), are presented. Both studies focus on the restoration of basketry plants by incorporating indigenous knowledge of changes in abundance of culturally significant plants; knowledge of sites appropriate for restoration of culturally significant plants; and knowledge of land management methods to restore species and/or habitats. Open-ended, semi-formal, and informal interviews were conducted with indigenous consultants familiar with the plant and/or habitat of interest. Traditional knowledge of appropriate restoration sites was used in a field experiment to re-establish sweetgrass in an area from which it is believed to have been extirpated. Traditional knowledge of anthropogenic burning was used to reintroduce fire in low-elevation beargrass habitats to manage both the resource and its environment. By incorporating traditional knowledge with published information on sweetgrass biology, it was found that two potential factors influencing its population in cultural gathering sites are unsustainable harvesting and the absence of controlled burns.
Show more

19 Read more

Community-based conservation and traditional ecological knowledge: implications for social-ecological resilience

Community-based conservation and traditional ecological knowledge: implications for social-ecological resilience

DISCUSSION The results presented above indicate that traditional ecological knowledge plays a more important role in enhancing local people's adaptive capacity to new social-ecological challenges in self-regulated community-based conservation initiatives than in comanaged community-based conservation initiatives where collaboration with government and scientists play a more central role. Furthermore, the review suggests the existence of four critical mechanisms through which traditional ecological knowledge results in positive adaptation in contexts of community-based conservation. First, people have the capacity to elaborate knowledge about ecosystems by testing it iteratively, as well as to learn from crises and management mistakes. Second, they are able to transmit and guard it locally, with the aim of adjusting management practices to new social-ecological states arising after perturbations. These two mechanisms are related to the dynamic nature of local knowledge (Evans et al. 2011, Gómez- Baggethun and Reyes-Garcia 2013) Third, an appropriate interpretation of ecosystem change is related to the traditional ceremonies and rituals that contribute to the cultural internalization of conservation rules. And fourth, such rules are the basis of flexible decision making. This is consistent with previous studies that have identified the linkages between local knowledge and resilience in social-ecological systems (Berkes et al. 2000, Folke et al. 2005). A review conducted by Berkes et al. (2000), for example, also identified the use of rules supported by customary institutions, rituals, and other traditions; flexibility in decision making; accumulation of ecosystem knowledge; and diversification of livelihood strategies as key mechanisms used by local people to cope with dynamic change in traditionally managed systems. In a recent study, Gómez-Baggethun et al. (2012) also identified these coping mechanisms as instrumental elements of traditional resource management in Spain's National Park of Doñana. Particularly in community-based conservation contexts, reported outcomes of the reviewed case studies suggest that, even though current environmental change is faster than the processes of generating and transmitting traditional ecological knowledge, many communities engaged in community-based conservation have been able to learn from experience and errors, engage young people in this learning process, and innovate and generate new knowledge to overcome crisis.
Show more

19 Read more

Responding to Modern Flooding: Old English Place-Names as a Repository of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Responding to Modern Flooding: Old English Place-Names as a Repository of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Koch and Hercus 2009; Johnson 2010; Kharusi and Salman 2015; Si 2016; Sommerseth 2011; Thornton 1997), no formal indigenous toponymic taxonomy has yet been proposed. All place-naming systems are, of course, unique. Each is shaped by the particularities of the semantic and lexical fields that structure the languages of those who name. Each responds to the physical environments in which the names must operate. All are contingent upon the cultural values of the naming group. And, importantly, all remain fluid and subject to modification over time as a consequence of social, cultural, linguistic, and environmental change (Kronenfeld and Rundblad 2003). No single classificatory model will ever account for the constellation of indigenous naming practices found across environments as diverse as the polar ice-fields and equatorial rain forests. But emerging from these studies are repeating sets of semantic place-name themes that appear common if not universal to traditional ecological knowledge naming. Six basic cross-cultural categories of traditional ecological knowledge place-names might be generalized.
Show more

27 Read more

An empirical comparison of knowledge and skill in the context of traditional ecological knowledge

An empirical comparison of knowledge and skill in the context of traditional ecological knowledge

Knowledge and skill may be different We measured how much people know about how to make an item and how good they were at making the same item. We did not find any association between the two vari- ables. One interpretation of this result is that measures of knowledge and skill in TEK research may not measure the same thing. We designed our measures of knowl- edge and skill in an attempt to maximize the association between them; nevertheless, there are very good reasons to expect that these two measures ought not to be asso- ciated, as discussed in the Limitations section below. For example, the characterstics used to judge the quality of an item appeared to have nothing to do (at least not directly) with the species used to construct the item. It is there- fore possible that we are measuring two different areas of knowledge, as opposed to contrasting measures of knowl- edge and skill pertaining to the same underlying core of knowledge. It could thus very well be the case that in this work, we were mistaken to expect our two measures to be related in the first place. All the more reason to make sure we are measuring what we want to be measuring! The conclusion we draw from the lack of association between our measures of knowledge and of skill is that measuring different aspects of TEK can return different results.
Show more

11 Read more

An Empirical Comparison of Knowledge and Skill in the Context of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

An Empirical Comparison of Knowledge and Skill in the Context of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

We found no statistically significant association between our measures of knowledge and skill. There are several possible interpretations of this result, which fall under two categories: it is possible (1) that knowledge and skill are actually distinct, conceptually and/or methodologically, and it is possible (2) that the data are inadequate, because of a small sample size and/or inappropriate variables. We discuss the rationale for, and implications of, these potential explanations. While we cannot exclude the possibility of a real association between knowledge and skill, it is clear that our two methods do not measure the same thing, and we argue that this finding is applicable to other studies in TEK. We conclude that, for research on trends in TEK or its returns, the choice of a method to measure TEK should be justified against the alternative methods available. This justification should include explicit a priori reasons to expect an association between the TEK variable and its hypothesized covariates.
Show more

20 Read more

An Empirical Comparison of Knowledge and Skill in the Context of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

An Empirical Comparison of Knowledge and Skill in the Context of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Knowledge and skill may be different We measured how much people know about how to make an item and how good they were at making the same item. We did not find any association between the two vari- ables. One interpretation of this result is that measures of knowledge and skill in TEK research may not measure the same thing. We designed our measures of knowl- edge and skill in an attempt to maximize the association between them; nevertheless, there are very good reasons to expect that these two measures ought not to be asso- ciated, as discussed in the Limitations section below. For example, the characterstics used to judge the quality of an item appeared to have nothing to do (at least not directly) with the species used to construct the item. It is there- fore possible that we are measuring two different areas of knowledge, as opposed to contrasting measures of knowl- edge and skill pertaining to the same underlying core of knowledge. It could thus very well be the case that in this work, we were mistaken to expect our two measures to be related in the first place. All the more reason to make sure we are measuring what we want to be measuring! The conclusion we draw from the lack of association between our measures of knowledge and of skill is that measuring different aspects of TEK can return different results.
Show more

13 Read more

An empirical comparison of knowledge and skill in the context of traditional ecological knowledge

An empirical comparison of knowledge and skill in the context of traditional ecological knowledge

Knowledge and skill may be different We measured how much people know about how to make an item and how good they were at making the same item. We did not find any association between the two vari- ables. One interpretation of this result is that measures of knowledge and skill in TEK research may not measure the same thing. We designed our measures of knowl- edge and skill in an attempt to maximize the association between them; nevertheless, there are very good reasons to expect that these two measures ought not to be asso- ciated, as discussed in the Limitations section below. For example, the characterstics used to judge the quality of an item appeared to have nothing to do (at least not directly) with the species used to construct the item. It is there- fore possible that we are measuring two different areas of knowledge, as opposed to contrasting measures of knowl- edge and skill pertaining to the same underlying core of knowledge. It could thus very well be the case that in this work, we were mistaken to expect our two measures to be related in the first place. All the more reason to make sure we are measuring what we want to be measuring! The conclusion we draw from the lack of association between our measures of knowledge and of skill is that measuring different aspects of TEK can return different results.
Show more

11 Read more

Spatio-temporal visualisation and data exploration of traditional ecological knowledge/indigenous knowledge

Spatio-temporal visualisation and data exploration of traditional ecological knowledge/indigenous knowledge

TEK is the ever-evolving corpus of observations, practices, and beliefs held by a group of people about the lands and waters where they live, and it is constantly being built up over generations. Although the term is often associated particularly with Indigenous peoples, any group living in an area quickly begins to build up such a corpus. It provides a counterpoint to state and scientiic environmental knowledge in that TEK is tied to the area, and is not usually approached in universalised terms. A particular place may be important for a particular species of ish, or a particular rock may be a nesting site for a particular species of bird. Individuals in a group are constantly making observations as they carry out their livelihoods, and as time goes by, some portions of information are discarded as no longer applicable, and new portions are added and shared with other community members if useful or effective. TEK stands in contrast to Scientiic/State Environmental/Ecological Knowledge (SEK) in that it does not aim for a single uniform or universalised understanding of the world.
Show more

19 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...