UK/Ireland

Top PDF UK/Ireland:

Rights based approaches to addressing food poverty and food insecurity in Ireland and UK

Rights based approaches to addressing food poverty and food insecurity in Ireland and UK

Fisheries and Food, 2011). In terms of social policy, both have been located in the ‘liberal’ regime of Esping-Andersen’s typology, though Ireland’s position is contested and, because of the importance of the Roman Catholic Church, also seen more typical of the ‘corporatist- statist’ regime (Arts and Gelissen, 2002). Indeed, the Church has played a key role in social service provision, including food, and policy influence since the foundation of the Irish State in 1922; the relationship, one of “peaceful co-existence”, sees each maintaining, but not challenging, the power of the other. More recently, Catholic social service provision has declined in the face of dwindling vocations, and its moral authority severely damaged by revelations of abuse perpetrated by Catholic clergy in Ireland. At the same time, as Fahey (2007) observes, it has become more involved in socio-economic critique and issues of social justice. In the UK, the Church of England has played little significant role in social policy or service provision since the advent of the welfare state, although it engages with urban and rural poverty and disadvantage, as do many civil society organisations. (Note, boundaries of the case study are fluid: the UK government retains policy responsibility for non-devolved matters, including social security, macro-economic management and trade; other policies and public services are now devolved to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.) There are
Show more

26 Read more

UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

The evidence on the value of skills and training investment to individuals, business, and the economy cannot be understated: for example, businesses that don’t train are twice as likely to close down as those that do. Despite this, the UK is losing ground compared to international competitors in terms of its stock of skills, and training by Northern Ireland’s employers has now fallen below 2005 levels. We need to ensure that we develop an ambitious economy, which sees development of the right skills to support the recovery. For the most part the labour market can meet the requirements of employers, but this simple statement masks a number of recruitment difficulties: there are still too many employers lacking the skilled people they require; these deficiencies tend to be persistent through time; despite evidence of businesses trying to grow their workforce, even at this time, employers are finding it difficult to find suitably skilled applicants for all their vacancies. This later point also shows there are still opportunities for workers with the right skills and qualifications regardless of the economic climate.
Show more

148 Read more

“Older” hotel employees’ perceptions of workplace equality in the UK and Ireland

“Older” hotel employees’ perceptions of workplace equality in the UK and Ireland

Conclusion: theories on workplace equality applied to older worker employment in hotels From interviews with “older” hotel workers in the UK and Ireland, it would appear that age and older age are relative concepts and the age at which a person becomes “old” will differ according to a range of factors such as health, income, gender, social class and education. Thus, defining an older worker in chronological terms is problematic and research on older workers which uses chronological age as a condition of respondent selection may result in the inclusion of workers who may not define themselves as “older” workers and the exclusion of those who might. Therefore, in researching older worker employment, it may be advantageous to select workers based on whether they consider themselves as older workers, an approach advocated by Riach (2007) as, for some people, a clear boundary into old age does not exist (Wilson, 2000). Furthermore, where older workers stated a chronological age well above the SPA, this may reflect Seabrook’s (2003, p. 29- 30) comment that “The age at which people admit to growing older has risen”.
Show more

17 Read more

Student Non-Continuation Rates in Northern Ireland and the UK

Student Non-Continuation Rates in Northern Ireland and the UK

Table 5 provides data on non-continuation rates at UK HEIs by subject for students entering University in 2007/08 and continuation rates on to 2008/09. As can be seen Engineering and Technology has the highest dropout rate in Northern Ireland with 17.9% of students failing to complete their first year. This equates to 100 students not completing first year (out of 555 entrants). The other regions also have a high non- completion rate for engineering, although it must be noted that a Combined Degree has the highest dropout rate for the other regions (28.7% in Welsh institutions – 35 out of 130 students).
Show more

11 Read more

Systematic exploration of local reviews of the care of maternal deaths in the UK and Ireland between 2012 and 2014: a case note review study

Systematic exploration of local reviews of the care of maternal deaths in the UK and Ireland between 2012 and 2014: a case note review study

This is the first study to systematically examine the number and quality of local reviews of the care of women who died during or after pregnancy in the UK and Ireland. It shows that only three-quarters of maternal deaths are reviewed and has highlighted that the care of women who died at less than 20 weeks gestation and between 28 and 42 days after birth was less likely to be reviewed. The care of women who died outside maternity services (eg, at home) and women who died from mental health-related causes was also less likely to be reviewed. The study also suggests that a substantial proportion of these local reviews of care were not optimal, in that they were not undertaken by a multidisciplinary group, did not include RCA and made relatively weak recommendations and actions.
Show more

6 Read more

The meteorology of the exceptional winter of 2015/2016 across the UK and Ireland

The meteorology of the exceptional winter of 2015/2016 across the UK and Ireland

Across Ireland, mean air temperatures were above their Long-Term Average (LTA), with half of Irish stations reporting anoma- lies over 1 degC from their seasonal means. A time series of five long-term stations in Ireland, shown at the top of Figure 1(b), recorded an average winter temperature of 7.0°C, a value which has been exceeded only five times since 1901. It was the third mildest winter overall for the UK at 5.5°C, behind only 2007 (5.6°C) and 1989 (5.8°C). Temperatures were widely in excess of 2  degC above the 1981–2010 climatology across central and southern England and Wales, shown in Figure 2. In the long running Central England Temperature (CET) series from 1659, it was nominally the second warmest winter at 6.7°C, behind 1868/1869 (6.8°C); however, it should be noted that the uncertainty on monthly mean CET is estimated at ±0.2 degC (Parker and Horton, 2005) , making these 2 years comparably warm given the uncer- tainty. For clarity the middle panel of Figure 1 only presents the CET from 1851 onwards. There are only 13 winters in the 357-year CET series that have mean winter temperatures that exceed 6.0°C; seven of these winters have occurred since 1975 and five have occurred since 1990.
Show more

10 Read more

Film and Television Music Sources in the UK and Ireland

Film and Television Music Sources in the UK and Ireland

of the locations of screen music sources in the UK and Ireland, supported by the Music Libraries Trust. The article highlights a number of issues encoun- tered when undertaking the work, suggests some possible avenues for further research in this area, and includes the outcome of the study in an appendix. Miguel Mera is a Senior Lecturer in Music at City University, London, and is widely published in music and moving image studies, from music in historical drama to the use of popular songs in contemporary cinema. His publications include European film music (Ashgate, 2006), Mychael Danna’s The Ice Storm: A film score guide (Scarecrow, 2007), and a special edition of the journal Music, sound and the moving image entitled ‘Invention/Re-invention’ (2009). Miguel also composes music for film and television. He is represented by Music Sales and his work has been screened and broadcast throughout the world. Ben Winters is a stipendiary lecturer in music at Christ Church, Oxford. He is the author of Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s The Adventures of Robin Hood: A Film Score Guide (Scarecrow Press, 2007), and has published articles on film music in the Journal of the Royal Musical Association; Music, Sound, and the Moving Image; and Interdisciplinary Humanities. Forthcoming publications include an article on film music theory in Music & Letters.
Show more

31 Read more

Enrolments at UK higher education institutions : Northern Ireland analysis 2012-2013

Enrolments at UK higher education institutions : Northern Ireland analysis 2012-2013

2. The data presented in this bulletin are based on data supplied by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). HESA is the official agency for the collection of information on publicly funded Higher Education (HE) institutions in the UK. It was set up in 1993 following the White Paper ‘Higher Education: a new framework’, which called for more coherence in HE statistics. HE institutions include all publicly-funded universities. The HESA data presented in this bulletin relate to students at HE institutions in the UK and therefore do not include HE enrolments at FE colleges in NI or GB, or at institutions in the Republic of Ireland. 3. A new specification of the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA)
Show more

38 Read more

Financial Incentives to Work: Comparing Ireland and the UK

Financial Incentives to Work: Comparing Ireland and the UK

This provides support to low-income working families, both with and without children. As well as supporting low-income working families, WTC also strengthens work incentives for those with low incomes who would otherwise see little difference between their earnings in work and the benefits they would be entitled to if they did not work. Similar programmes exist in other developed countries – for example, the earned income tax credit in the US and Family Income Supplement in Ireland. Programmes for providing support to low-income working families with children have existed in the UK since 1971, but they have expanded over time to the extent that they are almost unrecognisable from their original incarnations. They were extended to families without children when working tax credit was introduced in 2003. There were 2.3 million families claiming WTC in December 2015 and total expenditure in 2014-2015 was £6.2 billion.
Show more

55 Read more

Destinations of leavers from UK higher education institutions: Northern Ireland analysis, 2014/15

Destinations of leavers from UK higher education institutions: Northern Ireland analysis, 2014/15

Statistics and Research Branch is responsible for the collection, quality assurance, analysis and publication of timely and accurate information derived from a wide range of statistical information returns supplied by the Further Education (FE) colleges across Northern Ireland (NI) and the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) focused on NI Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and NI domiciled students in attendance at any UK HEI. Statistical information is collected routinely from a variety of electronic individual level administrative system.

86 Read more

Information Strategy Development in the UK and Ireland: a role for Aleph Paul Ayris, Director of UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer

Information Strategy Development in the UK and Ireland: a role for Aleph Paul Ayris, Director of UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer

This general picture of Higher Education in the UK and Ireland forms the background to the formation of the UK and Ireland Ex Libris Strategy Group of HE Library Directors whose institutions use Ex Libris library management software products. Our role is not to comment on, or to involve ourselves in, operational matters. It is to look at the way our institutions are developing, to survey the global world of information and information technology developments, to look at Ex Libris products in these twin contexts, and to engage with the company in strategic developments which are important for our futures.
Show more

7 Read more

An observational, retrospective, UK and Ireland audit of patient adherence to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a injections using the RebiSmart<sup>&reg;</sup> injection device

An observational, retrospective, UK and Ireland audit of patient adherence to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a injections using the RebiSmart<sup>&reg;</sup> injection device

In total, 230 patients were included in the APS and 225 (98%) were included in the FAS. Five patients were excluded from the APS for having less than the required 24-month adherence data (although these patients had been issued with the device for 24 months, they had not started to use it in time to provide 104 weeks of adherence data). Of the 225 patients, 161 (72%) were in the United Kingdom and 64 (28%) were in Ireland. The mean age and sex composition were as expected for this population of patients (Table 2). Sixty-six patients (29%) had previously received a DMD for MS (sc IFN β -1a without the RebiSmart ® injection device
Show more

9 Read more

Destinations of leavers from UK higher education institutions: Northern Ireland analysis - 2012/13

Destinations of leavers from UK higher education institutions: Northern Ireland analysis - 2012/13

It is within this context that DEL has developed a Higher Education Strategy for Northern Ireland, which aims to promote and sustain the development of an internationally competitive sector, accessible to all who are able to benefit, given the funding available, and meeting the needs of the Northern Ireland economy and wider society. This bulletin forms part of the evidence base informing the implementation of the HE Strategy, and will help shape the Department’s future policies.

76 Read more

Use of radiography in small animal practice in the UK and Republic of Ireland in 2013

Use of radiography in small animal practice in the UK and Republic of Ireland in 2013

respondents did not answer all survey questions. The denominator given in the results below relates to the number who responded to the question being considered. The response rate for the paper- based survey was 59% (412/698). It was not possible to determine the response rate for the online component as the questionnaire was distributed through open routes such as web links. One hundred and twenty-two responses were excluded leaving 1102 responses available for analysis. Responses were received from across the UK and ROI, although only 15 (1%) stated they worked in the ROI. The largest responding group who indicated their job role reported they were veterinary surgeons (598/1077; 56%), followed by veterinary nurses (469/1077; 44%). Respondents stated they most commonly worked in first opinion practice (822/1068; 77%), eight per cent (89/1068) in
Show more

17 Read more

Adult Literacy Strategies in Northern Ireland, the UK and ROI

Adult Literacy Strategies in Northern Ireland, the UK and ROI

other UK countries, across each of the three IALS literacy categories. Wales however is estimated to have had greater success in reducing the proportion of persons aged 16-65 performing at IALS Level 1 (this is due to Wales having the largest decline in the share of persons with no qualifications according to the Annual Population Survey). Wales has also increased the proportion of persons at IALS Level 3.

17 Read more

Making the Worst of a Bad Situation: A Note on Irexit

Making the Worst of a Bad Situation: A Note on Irexit

all economic analysis, are conditional on the data and the model used. As discussed by Manski (2015), official statistics must be taken with a grain of salt as the numbers are often subject to sizable revisions. In addition, the projections are sensitive as they rely on the underlying model and parameters. As such, as Manksi (2011) describes, this can lead to an “incredible certitude”, that is, selling the results without acknowledging their reliance on the data and methodology. This holds in our analysis as well. That said, certain matters feel quite certain: Brexit and Irexit will raise trade barriers, trade barriers reduce trade, and those reductions lower average income (particularly for certain groups of workers). Thus, given the relative importance of the EU26 as a trading partner relative to the UK, it is fairly credible to conclude that even in the best case scenario, trade diversion to the UK is unable to overcome the lost continental trade. Furthermore, since agricultural barriers are most likely to rise and low-income workers are most susceptible to price increases, these negative effects will be most severe for low-skill and agricultural workers (who, perversely, are generally perceived as those most supportive of the current global trend towards nationalism). Thus, the economics of the situation seem clear- cut – Irexit in any form is likely to make a bad situation worse, particularly for the most vulnerable members of Irish society. Even the best scenario here, in which Ireland remains in the EU, yields an Irish outcome likely to be far worse than for the EU overall where the projections of Emerson, et al. (2017) indicate annual losses of well below 1 per cent of GDP for the EU as a whole. This highlights the relative vulnerability of Ireland.
Show more

8 Read more

Middle Class International Migration: French Nationals Working in the UK

Middle Class International Migration: French Nationals Working in the UK

The number of EU citizens migrating to other member states increased an average of 10% per year between 2002 and 2006 (Herm, 2008). Also during that same period, the number of non-EU citizens immigrating to EU countries exceeded the number of EU citizens migrating across EU borders. Geo- graphic and cultural proximity and shared language are impor- tant factors in international migration, which explains the sig- nificant movement of citizens between Ireland and Britain, Finland and Sweden, and Germany and Austria (ibid.). The two countries in this study are unique in that they do not share a common language, and have many differences in terms of cul- ture and both economic and political institutions. Records of French citizens moving to London go as far back as the 1550s, when large numbers of French Huguenots crossed the Channel to escape persecution by the Catholic Church. London is con- sidered Europe’s most international city, as well as the EU’s capital in terms of finance, information technology, and media (Favell, 2008). With a strong economy, a long list of cultural attractions, and an open social environment, London continues to attract immigrants from all over the world, and its economic success is increasingly dependent on foreign-born labor (Wills et al., 2009). The proportion of foreign-born workers through- out the UK increased from 7% to 13% between 1993 and 2008; the increase in London during the same period was 25% to 38%.
Show more

7 Read more

New writings in feminist and women's studies winning and short listed entries from the 2017 feminist and women's studies association's annual student essay competition

New writings in feminist and women's studies winning and short listed entries from the 2017 feminist and women's studies association's annual student essay competition

The Feminist and Women’s Studies Association UK and Ireland (FWSA) is delighted to present this special issue of Journal of International Women’s Studies (JIWS) featuring the winning and shortlisted entries to our annual student essay competition. This year marks 30 years since the inception of the FWSA, as an association, in 1987. We are now an international network of scholars with members’ interests ranging across diverse topics in the arts, humanities, social and health sciences. Our anniversary is complimented by the warmth of our enduring relationship with JIWS, which has been publishing the winning and shortlisted essays from our essay competition for 13 years. Our sincere thanks go to Dr. Diana Fox, the managing editor of the journal, for her sterling support and ongoing collegiality. Celebrating the FWSA’s commitment to encouraging and supporting students and early career researchers with a likeminded partner is testament to the strong spaces of intellectual sustenance and engagement which feminist and gender oriented scholars have created in the contemporary academy. In addition to the student essay competition, the FWSA also runs an annual small grants competition to fund postgraduate research events, the Ailsa McKay Travel Grant to support students and early career researchers in attending conferences, and the annual book prize which rewards exceptional feminist publications. The vitality of our commitment to these issues was evidenced in the hugely successful 2017 FWSA conference, hosted by the University of Strathclyde. The theme, ‘Making space for feminism in the neoliberal academy’, saw a range of scholars come together to discuss feminist collegiality and care in an increasingly precarious university environment. This coming together of feminist solidiarities and the generosity they supply – evidenced intellectually in this special issue – is significant cause for hope and optimism within an increasingly neoliberalised academy.
Show more

5 Read more

Irish Journal of Paramedicine

Irish Journal of Paramedicine

Introduction: Following the re-launch in 2016 of mandatory Continuous Professional Competency (CPC) for Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) by the Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council (PHECC) Ireland (1), it is the aim of this research to explore volunteer EMTs perceived attitudes, barriers and confidence in relation to participating in CPC. Methods: A questionnaire for EMTs was distributed to the four main pre-hospital volunteer organisations and via the PHECC CPC coordinator social media account (Facebook) to gather information on attitudes towards CPC, perceived barriers to participating in CPC, and finally comfort level in completing the didactic aspects of CPC. Results: In total 341 eligible responses accounting for 15% of EMT registrants were analysed. 65% believed CPC was necessary for professional development, with 61% reporting it an important part of their practice. 57% believed CPC should be linked with maintaining PHECC registration, showing a decline of 38% against recent Irish research. The unique profile of respondents as volunteers highlights barriers commonly cited in the literature as having a more significant impact on CPC participation, most noteworthy over 80% cited time and access to relevant material/courses as impacting on participation. A 40/60 split between 2nd and 3rd level educational qualifications among respondents highlighted a marked difference in perceived confidence for completing didactic CPC elements among graduates with 2nd level reporting confidence at a third that of the level of 3rd level graduates. Compounding this finding, 52% of respondents reported receiving little or no training in CPC. Additionally, respondents cited restricted or no access to online journal or materials due to poor links via PHECC Registered Training Institutions or representative bodies to academic library access impacting on their ability to complete the didactic element of CPC. Recommendations: It is recommended that the PHECC 2014 EMT Education and Training Standard (2) be updated to include standardised CPC education for newly qualified EMTs. To fulfil case studies, reflective practice and literature reviews, volunteer EMTs require access to online journals and treatment information beyond the pre-hospital arena, all of which require immediate and viable solutions for successful completion of CPC by EMTs.
Show more

47 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects