Top PDF Methods and apparatus for teaching science and engineering

Methods and apparatus for teaching science and engineering

Methods and apparatus for teaching science and engineering

Methods and apparatus for teaching science and engineering Abstract The apparatus for teaching science and engineering is an interactive multimedia computer system which is used to simulate the performance of scientific experiments on the computer screen. An experiment is a method for determining the value of one experimental parameter by measuring the value of another using an experimental configuration of devices and apparatus. The interactions of the devices and apparatus in the experimental configuration are governed by a relationship among the experimental parameters that define the configuration. The user of the teaching apparatus assembles a pictorial representation of the experimental configuration on the computer screen and interacts with the pictured experimental configuration to simulate the performance of an experiment. The pictured experimental configuration is governed by the same relationship among experimental parameters as the real configuration and thus, the results of the simulated experiment match the results of the experiment performed in the laboratory. Still images and short motion pictures relating to the subject matter of the experiment can be accessed by the user as an aid to his understanding of the subject matter.
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Computational Methods for Science and Engineering

Computational Methods for Science and Engineering

rescheduled. If teaching is no longer given for a course, three examination occurrences are held during the immediately subsequent year, while examinations are at the same time held for any replacement course that is given, or alternatively in association with other re-examination opportunities. Furthermore, an examination is held on one further occasion during the next subsequent year, unless the board of studies determines otherwise.

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Machine-learning methods for computational science and engineering

Machine-learning methods for computational science and engineering

Schrodinger’s equation. Rupp et al. [ 93 ] predicted the ground state using non-linear ridge regression that takes as its input nuclear charges and atomic positions. The authors investigated the effect of the size of the training set on the accuracy of the predictions and found that as it ranged from 500 to 7000 molecules, a significant drop in the mean absolute error was observed. The trained model can make predictions on new organic molecules at practically no computational cost, with an error of less than 10 kcal/mol, an accuracy that surpasses most semi-empirical quantum chemistry-based methods. Subsequently, Hansen et al. [ 94 ] assessed the performance and usage of different ML algorithms for the same task, i.e., the calculation of the ground energy. They considered linear ridge regression, non-linear ridge regression using a Laplacian or Gaussian kernel, Support Vector Machines (SVM), k-nearest neighbor, and fully connected, feed-forward, multilayered neural networks. They found that linear regression and k-nearest neighbor algorithms were inadequate for the task. Instead, kernel-based methods and the ANN yielded errors of less than 3 kcal/mol, a significant improvement to the results presented by Rupp et al. [ 93 ]. More recently, a paper proposed a novel method for calculating the ground state and evolution of highly entangled, many-body, QM problems using ANNs [ 95 ]. The ANN uses a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM) architecture. In general, RBMs includes two layers: the first acts as the input to the network and is usually referred to as the visible layer, while the second is called the hidden layer. The network outputs the probability of occurrence of the input configuration in the visible layer, which in the present paper represented the configuration of N spins. The RBM therefore acts as the wavefunction of the system.
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TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING THROUGH ROBOTICS: SCIENCE & ART FORM

TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING THROUGH ROBOTICS: SCIENCE & ART FORM

lessons that the pre-collegiate teachers created using the constructed definitions above. These lessons are available at http://www.uwrobotics.com. Discussion Taken together, these results illustrate that teacher confidence and knowledge can be enhanced, even when they have little to no formal collegiate experience in these domains. Does confidence level of pre-collegiate teachers impact their ability to create and implement lessons that use computer programming and robotics kits as a mechanism to introduce computer science and engineering in classroom instruction? Simply put, yes it does. As such, this data lends weight to the ongoing plea to policy makers to provide continued opportunities for high quality PD for pre-collegiate teachers, particularly in areas that will be new in the Next Generation Science Standards, which are based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2012). This research motivates us to pursue more deeply, questions surrounding supporting teachers’ understanding and implementation of computer science concepts. The recurring core computer science concepts found in this study are STEM content integration, engineering design, and encoding.
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SOFTWARE ENGINEERING: METHODS, MODELING, AND TEACHING, VOL. 3

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING: METHODS, MODELING, AND TEACHING, VOL. 3

Software Engineering: Methods, Modeling, and Teaching, Vol. 3, Chapter #2, pp. 9–18, ISBN 978-958-775-080-5 1 INTRODUCTION Science and technology fields, such as physics and compu- ting, have continuously sought underlying theories, rules, and patterns that we can use to precisely predict outcomes given certain inputs, and to explain certain phenomena of the uni- verse. Theories help us explain how the universe works. Good theories and models should be able not only to explain what has been observed, but also predict phenomena that have yet to be observed (Tichy, 2011). Similar to other ma- ture disciplines, e.g., physics, medicine, psychology etc., software engineering as a discipline is on its way to become more mature evidenced by the many theories and models that describe our field. Some theories (models)—related to empir- ical software—have established their broader impact. Exam- ples of such theories (models) include Human Information Process (HIP) model (Hedge, 2014; Miller, 2014; Miller, 1956) that explains human ability to process and respond to the information they received through their senses; Technolo- gy Acceptance Model (TAM) that models that how users are come to accept and use a technology (TAM, 2014); and the Theory of Planed Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991) that has been used successfully to predict and explain a wide range of health behaviors and intentions.
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Teaching Electronic Materials Science to Electrical Engineering Majors

Teaching Electronic Materials Science to Electrical Engineering Majors

Bluesheets are also used in the laboratory sessions. Cooking Without Recipes Traditionally the laboratory component of an engineering course is regarded by instructors as the opportunity for students to experience the material in a “hands-on” way in order to allow the material to “sink in”. It is only in graduate school or in an undergraduate research experience that students are exposed to the concept of an open-ended problem with multiple solutions and the necessity of obtaining a full understanding of the instruments and methods being used. Unfortunately, the traditional method of laboratory instruction frequently degenerates into a "cookbook" method. Such labs are frequently unsuccessful in teaching students much beyond a specific content and pre-determined laboratory methodology. Thus most laboratory instruction does not contribute to the development of the student as a critical thinker. We are developing a methodology to re- configure traditional laboratory exercises so as to contribute to the education of engineers as critical thinkers, adept at interpreting data and solving open-
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Computer science education teaching methods: An overview of the literature

Computer science education teaching methods: An overview of the literature

Many theoretical learning-teaching approaches make a distinction between learning phases/processes/cycles for which teaching methodology aids are formulated; overviews of such are provided by Kron (2008) as well as Straka and Macke (2006). Roth (1970), whose educational psychology of learning approach comprises six learning phases (motivation, difficulty, solution, action and execution, retention and practice as well as provision, transfer and integration of what has been learned) recommends for his first learning phase, motivation, “…linking (it) to the interests of the individual learning, awakening new interests, moving children to act”. In his theory of discovery learning Bruner (1966, p. 48; 1972) emphasizes three learning processes (acquisition of new information, transformation, evaluation) in the act of learning for which Eigler, Judith, Künzel, and Schönwäldler (1973, p. 89) formulate process-oriented (e.g. analysis of the problem, production of hypotheses, testing hypotheses) and product-oriented teaching aids (e.g. directing attention, giving clues and partial solutions) (on this also refer to Straka & Macke, p. 117). The “Cognitive Apprenticeship” approach from Collins, Brown and Newman (1989), which has situated learning at its core, reveals six teaching techniques: modeling, coaching, scaffolding and fading, articulation, reflection, and exploration. Problem-oriented learning in learning cycles plays an important role in Mandl’s theoretical learning position (Reinmann-Rothmeier & Mandl, 2001). The learning nine cycles are: foresight and reflection, confrontation with the introductory problem, idea production, multiple perspectives, research and improvement, self-testing and self-evaluation, public depiction, continuing intensification, reflection and review.
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Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants teaching self-efficacy

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants teaching self-efficacy

Seven items related to overall course design and planning were removed because STEM GTAs were rarely involved in course design or were the primary instructors responsible for a course. The CTSES also contained five items on reflective practice, many of which required teaching the same course repeatedly. Many GTAs, especially in engineering, did not teach in the same course repeatedly, so these items were removed. Three items that were unclear to the researchers or included technical pedagogical language were removed. There were also two pairs of redundant items, so one item from each pair was removed. Four items were rewritten to be more specific to the STEM GTA context; and given the large amount of group work in STEM laboratory classes; one item related to student interaction was added. Face validity of the items was reviewed by two additional social science faculty members with knowledge of both social cognitive theory and instrument design; they were asked to evaluate whether each item represented an aspect of GTA teaching self-efficacy, comment on clarity, and suggest revisions or additions. The final STEM GTA-Teaching Self-Efficacy Scale (STEM GTA-TSES) as administered contained 28 items measured on a five point scale anchored with A (no confidence) and E (complete confidence).
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Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate
teaching assistants teaching self-efficacy

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants teaching self-efficacy

Teaching self-efficacy of GTAs has been measured with an instrument originally designed for psychology students (Prieto & Altmaier, 1994) or one taken from the K-12 teaching context (often the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale; Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2001), but it has been recognized that teaching in STEM is fundamentally different from other disciplines and this difference should be recognized in roles of GTAs (Golde & Dore, 2004; Lindblom-Ylanne, Trigwell, Nevgi, & Ashwin, 2006; Torvi, 1994; Verleger & Velasquez, 2007). STEM GTAs are rarely responsible for a course (Abraham et al., 1997; DeChenne et al., 2009; Sundberg et al., 2005; Torvi, 1994), but instead teach laboratory and recitation sections, so usually act as a conduit between the students and course professor. STEM GTAs need to understand complex grading rubrics and have skills allowing them to facilitate questions without giving students answers. STEM students often work independently or in small groups on complex projects that can span a term or more of coursework (Moore & Diefes-Dux, 2004; Pomalaza-Raez & Groff, 2003; Taylor, Heer, & Fiez, 2003). GTAs must understand these long-term projects, how to facilitate learning, and help students at different points of scholarship and with often frustrating problems. All of these activities require STEM GTAs to have excellent interpersonal skills.
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Teaching Fire Science and Fire Protection Engineering to Building Engineering Students 1

Teaching Fire Science and Fire Protection Engineering to Building Engineering Students 1

As more students and practicing engineers become interested in fire protection engineering, on-line information will also become increasingly important, especially for those who do not have regular access to the collections available at universities and institutes who conduct fire-related research. For example, many university libraries do not regularly receive fire journals or have copies of key fire science references. While researchers can use interlibrary loan services for obtaining papers, students taking courses may not have the time to wait for delivery of a reference book when studying for an examination. Video and other fire information available on the web can help to allow schools, which may not have large-scale test amenities, to still develop an appreciation of fire testing in their students. In this class, the students were given the address for NIST’s website, which contains video of fire tests of different products, from which the students could get a better appreciation of the magnitude of heat release rates, and the speed of fire growth. While not done in this course, students could have also been asked to characterize these real fires using a simple model, such as a t 2 fire, in order to learn about the use of design fires.
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Mathematics - Advanced Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering (Hayek)

Mathematics - Advanced Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering (Hayek)

Chapter 4 covers the derivation and methods of solution of linear boundary value problems for physical systems in one spatial dimension governed by ordinary differential.. equa[r]

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The Influence of a Science Methods Course on Prospective Elementary Teachers’ Visions of Science Teaching

The Influence of a Science Methods Course on Prospective Elementary Teachers’ Visions of Science Teaching

While this study demonstrated that prospective elementary teachers’ visions of themselves as science teachers became more aligned with or maintained alignment with principles espoused in their methods courses, the study did not follow these teachers into their beginning practice. This is an important avenue for future research in order to determine the extent to which these visions are put into practice after prospective teachers complete their teacher education program and move into their own classrooms. Further research might also examine how the principles from the methods course are reflected in other assignments from the methods course (i.e. unit and lesson plans). While examining these course artifacts would not show whether the prospective teachers enact the principles, they could provide insights beyond what is available from the survey data used in this study.
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Integrating Russian Methods of Teaching Literature into the World Science and Practice

Integrating Russian Methods of Teaching Literature into the World Science and Practice

IJALEL 6(1):286-297, 2017 295 Thus, it is possible to trace several scientific and practical results firstly obtained in this research study. While N. D. Moldavskaya (1976) gave the first definition of the “schoolchildren literary development” and cleared its criteria and V. G. Marantsman (2005) distincted the periods of literary development of a school aged reader and the changes characterising it at each stage, specified literary development criteria, the authors of this paper for the first time in the Russian methodical literature discourse have revealed the bases for the issue concerning schoolchildren literary development dating back to the 19th - early 20th century when this notion was only mentioned but had not yet entered the terminological system of literary methodology as a science; and they have also firstly traced the emergence and formation of the methodical literary system development in the Russian literature teaching methodology of 1840s-2000, outlined the prospects of its study, convincingly demonstrated its ability to enter the international level.
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Aboriginal Students’ Achievement in Science Education: The Effect of Teaching Methods

Aboriginal Students’ Achievement in Science Education: The Effect of Teaching Methods

Ideas for Future Research We believe that this study sheds new light on the issue of learning styles in Aboriginal education. Increasingly, it appears that empirical bases for adapting teaching methods to learning styles that are supposedly peculiar to Aboriginal students remain elusive. Nevertheless, we suggest an additional and nearly unexplored research avenue: adapting performance measures to a diversity of pedagogical approaches. Although pedagogical trends have diversified con- siderably in the last two decades, standard learning assessment has remained strangely monolithic. Yet the arrival of new pedagogical approaches has coin- cided with the development of new assessment modes. These are, however, not applied in standard assessments, which may consequently draw a biased pic- ture of the level of performance of an increasing number of students who benefit from a renewed teaching approach. Therefore, an interesting replica- tion of this study could offer several modes of assessing skill level and analyze the variation in performance associated with the measuring method, by check- ing, for example, whether the results are superior when the teacher’s pedagog- ical approach and the mode of assessment coincide. This raises another question: if adapting to a given learning style requires adjusting both teaching method and assessment modes, is it possible to establish a common metric that would allow the comparison of nothing more than the effect of teaching meth- ods (by controlling the performance measure effect)? As long as we have not taken up this challenge, it will be difficult to reject completely the possibility of distinct learning styles.
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Science Educators Teaching Engineering Design: An Examination across Science Professional Development Sites

Science Educators Teaching Engineering Design: An Examination across Science Professional Development Sites

Both of these issues—timing for activities and teaching for conceptual mastery—point toward an issue alluded to in our findings that we underscored here. Expertise matters. While no complex program can easily manage the attainment of excellence at all times amongst all participants, minimally, reasonable levels of professional integration should argue for engagement with subject matter and professional practice experts. Moreover, this kind of work is needed sorely as science educators will likely be charged, via curricular changes due to the NGSS‘s emphasis on engineering, to significantly teach engineering content. In our case, program leadership showed but a minimum of concern with seriously engaging with best practice in engineering design pedagogy, in favor of their own amalgam—at best a gloss on the standards of the field. This might not warrant mention except for the fact that this style of program decision making led to staff attrition by the sole design expert employed by the program.
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Teaching and learning apparatus for pressure and temperature
based system

Teaching and learning apparatus for pressure and temperature based system

information to achieve of the study that are getting complex nowadays. Further more this study kit can teach the students become more independence and solve the problem of having difficulties in finding reference book. (Baron & Orwing 1997). The statement of the result of engineering students are not very good compare to the students who are not in engineering field need to be finalize again. This might be cause by the teaching style which are not suitable with the condition of the students. With this purpose this research is form by using study kit as a media in the process of teaching and learning in the classroom. By using this study Kit the students can understand the content of study more easily compare to the formal study. This is because this study kit is module based and was created to upgrade the skill of the engineering students especially in the higher education.
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Comparative Analysis of Teaching methods in Electrical Engineering Courses – A Case Study

Comparative Analysis of Teaching methods in Electrical Engineering Courses – A Case Study

Keywords: Electrical engineering, teaching, learning, education, rectifier circuits, software’s I. INTRODUCTION Teaching engineering is not easy for educators in the Universities and educational institution across the globe, especially electrical engineering. Novel teaching methods and techniques are required in order to provide better delivery of the course content to the students which will in turn provide better and in-depth knowledge of the concepts. With the invention, advancements and use of the World Wide Web or internet, in synchronisation with evolving information and communication tools, e-learning has become an important part of teaching/learning processes in the Universities. Ease of learning, flexibility, trial and error analysis, mathematical computing on data’s, repetitive learning made software based e-Learning becomes a modern day alternative to traditional teaching methods like board and easel teaching. It is evident that computer aided design based software’s are helpful not only in the analysis of the complex circuits, but as well in teaching engineering students. As far as the electrical and electronics engineering courses are concerned the subject matter is conceptual and complex to understand – U cannot see the flow of current like flow of water. Students cannot visualise how current flows in a circuit or how a ac voltage is converted to dc voltage in a mobile charger.
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Integrating Problem Solving and Research Methods Teaching for Systems Practice in Engineering

Integrating Problem Solving and Research Methods Teaching for Systems Practice in Engineering

Fig 3. (a) A 4-stage problem solving approach as a development of current use in research methods teaching; (b) the project may well loop around the phases either deliberately as in an action research program, or spontaneously due to the nature of the research findings. The approach clearly has resonances with the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust stages of the Deming cycle. We assume that all projects start from a problem, or equally an opportunity statement, which in effect is Stage 0, and is the initiating event for the instance of the approach and is the problem situation unresolved, or unstructured in Checkland’s language. Each step is executed in turn but there is a degree of fuzzy overlap and/or backtracking between neighboring stages. For example, back-tracking from the end of the Implementing/Taking Action stage would be recognized as the process of Change Management. The problem statement at stage 0 does not remain static, the world moves on, so a developed visualization is as the spiral shown in Figure 3 (b). We assert that research methods can be used at any point in any/all of the stages to answer research questions that arise in this process of problem solving. Each stage has an associated set of processes that can be used to progress the stage, by adopting gerund (verbal nouns indicating action) labels we suggest a process model view of the problem solving approach that is designed to emphasize the fact that the Research Engineer is engaged in a process of enquiry. The approach is owned by the Research Engineer; i.e. our perspective here is that the Research Engineer needs a problem solving approach aligned to a systems perspective and focused on delivering a body of research over the 4 year duration of their project.
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Application Of Modern Teaching Methods To Study Of Navigation And Marine Engineering Technology

Application Of Modern Teaching Methods To Study Of Navigation And Marine Engineering Technology

8) We organize and guide our students to participate in science activities that are relevant to their professional knowledge, and will enrich their lives after class. One of the students’ science activities that we organized last year was the solar energy lifeboat concept design. Around this theme, students studied about the solar energy principle and solar energy battery board themselves. Students combined the new knowledge with the knowledge of body craftwork, hydrodynamics, ship design and so on what they have learned in the classroom. They finished the drawing design and modeling design with the help of their tutor. The solar energy lifeboat was awarded the bronze prize in the national competition of all undergraduates with “Challenge Cup” in 2002. This activity inspired students’
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The relationship between teaching methods and students achievement in engineering technology subjects

The relationship between teaching methods and students achievement in engineering technology subjects

Faculty of Technical Education University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) ABSRACT Effective teaching gives meaning and bearing, and have a permanent and continuous value that can be applied by a student for dealing with future challenges. Thus, effective teaching can be defined as a system of activities that can improve learning outcomes required in the final in a healthy, democratic and vibrant, so this research was conducted to investigate the relation between teachers‟ teaching methods and students‟ achievement in the engineering technology subjects. This study involved 29 teachers who teach engineering technology as respondents at secondary school in Johor witch offered engineering technology subject. Objective of this research is to identify the relation between teachers‟ teaching methods with student achievement in the engineering technology subject and to know the most dominant teachers‟ teaching method in the engineering technology subject. This study was conducted through questionnaires and feedback from 29 teachers of engineering technology as a respondent. The data from this study will be analyzed in terms of mean scores, using “Statistical Package for Social Science” (SPSS) Software Version 10.0. The expected result will be a guide to teachers of engineering technology to improve their teaching methods. In addition, this study will be used as a guide to future researchers.
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