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FACULTY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT /

FACULTY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT /

This BSc builds on the core programme offered within the School of Planning focusing on urban planning and design and combines it with a focus on property markets, investment decisions and real estate economics. It is accredited by the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). The programme aims to give you a coherent understanding of urbanism and the built environment, with a particular focus on the role of real estate investment, development and appraisal. It enables you to combine a sound theoretical foundation with an awareness of practice, and provides knowledge about the various roles and responsibilities of urban professionals in society. Compulsory courses in all years equip you with relevant theories, methodologies, skills, and techniques taken from both the social science and design disciplines.
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Building with Employers: An evaluation of Built Environment Courses

Building with Employers: An evaluation of Built Environment Courses

This st udy was carried out t o evaluat e t he delivery of Built Environment (BE) programmes which have long hist ory and credibilit y from t he employers, however, evidence j ust ify t he relevancy and effect iveness of t he courses was lacking. In line wit h st rat egic plan (Sout hampt on Solent Universit y, 2008-13), it was essent ial t o look int o t he current provisions, st udent s and employer percept ion of t he courses, and gat her informat ion t o support development of new courses and enhance t he exist ing port folio t o provide high qualit y learning and t eaching in t he courses. This st udy was funded by t he St rat egic Development Programme wit h an aim t o est ablish t he currency and relevancy of t he BE courses.
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Exploring disaster risk reduction in the built environment

Exploring disaster risk reduction in the built environment

According to ISDR (2010) the local governments can play a major role in urban disaster risk reduction. They are in charge of critical development functions to reduce disaster risks, such as land use planning, urban development planning, public works, construction safety and licensing, social services and responding to the need of the poor and the under privileged and implementation and strengthening of the decentralization process (ISDR, 2010). It is understood that local government should take advice and consultancy from the built environment professionals in order to perform the above activities efficiently and effectively. In addition ISDR (2010) identified the following disaster risk reducing measures where local governments can incorporate professionals of built environment disciplines. This includes, invest and maintain risk reducing infrastructure such as flood drainage; apply risk compliant building regulations and land use planning norms appropriate to the needs and possibilities of low income citizens; ensure the safety of all schools and health facilities and upgrade as necessary; provide ecosystems and natural buffers to mitigate floods, storm surges and other hazards; adapt to climate change building on risk reduction practices. The built environment professionals have vital role in all the above activities including planning, designing, construction and project management and consultancy services.
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Safer built environment for climate impacts in Malaysia

Safer built environment for climate impacts in Malaysia

While acknowledging the fact that Malaysia is using built environment specific mitigation and adaptation strategies, it was claimed that such strategies are still at minimal implementation. The effectiveness in implementing such strategies needs to be improved in order to enjoy the maximum benefits such strategies could bring into create a safer built and human environment. The challenges and barriers that affect the effective implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies were identified and the barriers are classified under economical, political, social, knowledge and legal categories.
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The rise of sustainability services for the built environment in Malaysia

The rise of sustainability services for the built environment in Malaysia

The early introduction of such tools in the ‘innovator’ countries reflects the direction of government policy making at that particular time. For example, BREEAM was established in the UK as a voluntary measurement rating and was devised by a government funded research body called the Building Research Establishment (BRE). In all these ‘innovator’ countries, subsequent government policies have followed to ensure more stringent requirements and regulation of the sustainability performance within the built environment. In the 2000s, a number of developed countries followed the trend by developing their own tools. Described as the ‘early majority’, countries include Canada, Australia, Italy, Portugal, Japan and Singapore. These countries followed suit once a sustainability assessment tool become more formally recognised by the built environment sectors in the respective ‘innovator’ countries.
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Adolescents’ use of the built environment for physical activity

Adolescents’ use of the built environment for physical activity

A researcher provided each subject with a hip-worn belt equipped with an accelerometer (GT3X; ActiGraph LLC) to record physical activity and a GPS receiving unit (QStarz BT-Q1000XT) to record location. Accelerom- eter and GPS devices were both set to record at 30 sec- ond intervals, with their internal clocks synchronized. Subjects were asked to wear the belt at all times during waking non-water activity hours for at least 5 weekdays and 2 weekend days and to recharge their GPS overnight in two separate seasons, one warm (September through mid-November, April through June) and one cold (mid- December through March), to account for known seasonal variations in physical activity levels and built environment use [7]. Study staff recorded the temperature (high, low, average; recorded as Fahrenheit to the nearest whole unit) and weather condition (sun; overcast; rain; snow) on each study day.
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Categorisation of built environment characteristics: the trouble with tertiles

Categorisation of built environment characteristics: the trouble with tertiles

Interest in the effect of the built environment on obesity and related behaviours has grown over the last fifteen years [1], with geographic information system software allowing objective measures of neighbourhood resources to be linked to health outcomes. Much research has con- sidered benefits of access to presumed “healthy” re- sources, such as supermarkets [2,3] which provide nutritious foods, and sports centres [4] where physical activity is undertaken, and “unhealthy” resources such as fast-food outlets [2,3] which sell high calorie content products. Built environment attributes (e.g., street con- nectivity or land use) which may promote healthy behav- iours such as walking have also been examined [5].
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A novel tool for assessing and summarizing the built environment

A novel tool for assessing and summarizing the built environment

features of the residential built environment. We then grouped variables likely to contribute to the same latent construct, meaning the variables are indicative of an unob- servable factor likely to affect health rather than being expected to directly impact health. For example, a broken window and foundation damage both describe physical housing conditions, and while we would not expect a broken window or foundation damage individually to be associated with health, the underlying housing conditions these may highlight, especially when clustered, may be associated with health. Each variable was categorized into one of the following residential BE domains: housing dam- age (13 variables), property disorder (14 variables), mea- sures of territoriality (6 variables), vacancy (3 variables), or nuisances (in public spaces only) (26 variables). Table 1 details which variables were assigned to each domain.
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A Future Flood Resilient Built Environment

A Future Flood Resilient Built Environment

Climate change may have significant implications for the built environment, with impacts likely on buildings, energy, transport, ICT and water infrastructure. Analysis from the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) indicates that the built environment will be affected by extreme weather events. Impacts will arise due to increased temperatures and changing rainfall patterns. Flooding is one of the highest order risks for the built environment and is expected to be more frequent throughout the 21st Century. Flood risk will increase not only due to climate change, but perhaps more importantly increasing urbanisation.
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Impact of the built environment on coffee shops

Impact of the built environment on coffee shops

going to be the reason for the success of his business. The decision to move next door was based on the fact that the location on that block was an asset to the business and also because he didn’t want to recreate the business after his customers had become accustomed to coming to that location . The owner was conscious of the built environment challenges when first locating his business and made plans for improving them. For example, after leasing the space, he petitioned for sidewalks along the block, providing better access– a change he believed was essential to the success of his business. He is also conscious of the other assets of his location, including the close proximity to other businesses, residences, and public transportation; visibility from the street; and room for outdoor seating. All of these elements were confirmed as assets through the customer survey as well.
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Impact of Culture on Rural Built Environment

Impact of Culture on Rural Built Environment

A survey of an extensive variety of important writing identifying with culture, maintain and the built environment is exhibited. This survey concentrated on applicable productions in scholarly writing that give proof of the part of the culture in an economically manufactured condition. The survey of writing highlights the expanding acknowledgment of culture as effective and critical perspective in encouraging financial, social and natural measurements of advancement. Culture is a key component in the idea of practical advancement as it casings individuals' connections and states of mind towards the built and the natural environment. Supportable advancement is an essential piece of the general public and culture; influencing all parts of operations in the built environment. This section gives an inside and out knowledge into the commitment of culture and places culture as the conceivable fourth measurement of supportability and a fundamental piece of ecological, financial and social measurements of economic advancement (Opoku, 2015).
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Interpretive Communities at work and play in the built environment

Interpretive Communities at work and play in the built environment

Fish’s writings on interpretive communities provide a helpful bridge from cultural studies into legal studies – but Fish’s cross-over is the exception, rather than the rule. There has been little work (either theoretically or empirically) in legal studies to examine how lay ‘audiences’ receive and interpret aspects of the law that have been ‘broadcast’ to them. Thus the programme’s contribution to legal scholarship is that it (specifically in Articles 1-3) empirically applies cultural studies’ ‘audience- reception theory’ beyond its usual concern with “fan cultures” (Hills 2003) and into to the receipt of the ‘messages’ intended by legislators in enacting the Occupiers’ Liability Acts 1957 and 1984. Through empirical investigation of three case studies the programme considers how the ‘audience’ (the cemetery managers, arboriculturalists and judges) ‘hear’ and interpret those legislative pronouncements, and shows how through their interpretive actions within their communities the abstract generalities of this legislation are translated (and approximated) into practical, place- governing and decision-taking action. In focussing upon the ‘translational’ interpretive actions of professional intermediaries within the built environment this programme presents a unique insight into the pragmatics of place management.
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Acrology and Arcosanti : Towards a sustainable built environment

Acrology and Arcosanti : Towards a sustainable built environment

A pro-growth development paradigm has underpinned the formation of the built environment throughout the 20th century. The Club of Rome's Limits to Growth report (Meadows, Meadows, Randers, Behrens, 1972) highlighted an inherent fundamental flaw, pointing out that global growth in population numbers, resource use, waste production, and pollution is exponential. While this kind of growth displays a gentle and gradual curve for a long time it rapidly shoots up in a very short period of time. What might seem like a manageable rate of resource use and waste disposal can quickly result in dangerously low levels of available resources and dangerously high levels of pollution. Environmentalists now question whether the rapid growth of cities in recent years can be sustained. They argue that in order that the quality of life of their inhabitants be maintained, let alone enhanced, the aggregate impact of cities on the environment-a product of the relationship between population, per capita consumption or economic activity, and
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Arcology and arcosanti: towards a sustainable built environment

Arcology and arcosanti: towards a sustainable built environment

sustainable development has, in recent years, begun to achieve political priority status among government institutions seeking a planned response to urban environmental problems. Alternative ways of re-thinking and reforming the built environment within a rapidly urbanizing world are now being considered. Within the academic and policy literature emerging around the notion of sustainable cities, a number of different models have been developed which represent different views of how such environments might be realized (Haughton & Hunter, 1994). Some advocate the re-designing the physical fabric of the city in order to improve resource efficiency and bring about more self-reliant
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Haptic interfaces for wheelchair navigation in the built environment

Haptic interfaces for wheelchair navigation in the built environment

Virtual reality (VR) simulations of the built environment may provide the basis for such tools through accurate visualisation and user interaction. However, to capitalise on the potential for using VR as a tool to improve building accessibility it is vital that navigation through the VR world should be driven by systems that accurately reflect the mode of transport used by intended users. Immersion in VR systems is principally generated by optic flow driven by a navigation device. However, as wheelchair accessibility is constrained not only by the architectural layout of an environment but also by the physical features of the ground that the chair is moving across it is apt that VR environments designed for assessing wheelchair access should provide non-visual sensory feedback to the user that relates to the effort associated with propelling a wheelchair over changing terrains.
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A study into recruitment and selection for the built environment disciplines

A study into recruitment and selection for the built environment disciplines

There is no definitive description of ‘employability' in the Built Environment disciplines but there is a linkage between identifiable attributes which tend to correlate with success in gaining employment. Recruiters in the Built Environment disciplines try to assess the way in which an applicant would ‘fit’ into the team, business unit or company. Some of the aspects identified in the literature as desired by the company (for example flexibility and adaptability) are difficult to assess during selection procedure and can only be judged fully when the candidate is in post. Where attributes are difficult to assess, indirect methods are used which include looking at past employment or exam track record.
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Legal research in the built environment: A methodological framework

Legal research in the built environment: A methodological framework

The science / arts & humanities distinction reflects genuine epistemological and methodological differences between the families of disciplines about the nature of knowledge, and about the manner of its production. Becher [18] has described knowledge production in the sciences in terms of the cumulative and piecemeal accumulation of individual segments of knowledge which, over time, contribute to a comprehensive explanation of particular phenomena. He contrasts this with humanities disciplines like law. These, he describes, as being concerned with the organic development of knowledge through an ongoing process of reiterative enquiry. They address multifaceted, rather than discrete, problems and attempt, not to explain the individual components of phenomena, but to develop a holistic understanding of their overall complexity. The dominance of the scientific disciplines within the built environment inevitably influences prevailing views about knowledge and knowledge production within the field. Indeed, the language of built environment research is often dominated by the rhetoric of the social sciences in particular. This is characterised by a concern with the traditional social science methodologies (see, for example, Fellows & Liu [19]) and with an emphasis on empirical investigations rather than the development of theoretical perspectives (Betts & Lansley [20]; Brandon [21]).
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Bringing public health into built environment education

Bringing public health into built environment education

The Wanless review for the future of the health service (2002) came to the view that with increasing costs, an ageing population and a rise in ‘lifestyle’ diseases, an NHS to treat ill health would not be affordable in the future and it recommended a ‘fully engaged’ scenario where all sectors are part of the solution for improving health. The Department of Health’s workforce unit developed this into the concept of a ‘wider health workforce’ which includes, amongst others, the built environment professions. The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution’s report The Urban
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Islamic thoughts and individuals' actions in the built environment

Islamic thoughts and individuals' actions in the built environment

The way Islamic thought has affected an individual’s action based on the effective information in the built environment is a considerable issue. This study argued that Islamic thought in which parts and stages of executing an action is effective. It is an interdisciplinary research with context analysis in order to consider the related psychological and environmental theories and documents derived from the secondary sources. The findings demonstrated that Islamic thought as a determinant factor affects an individual’s action in the built environment from two essential directions, including: 1) its effect through environmental information in the built environment; 2) its effect on the perceptual process of people to execute an action. Consequently, although the perception of people from Islamic thought is very effective in executing an individual’s action, the developers and planners of the built environments in Islamic societies are able to affect an individual’s action by means of design manipulation.
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Utilization of Digital Games in Built Environment Education

Utilization of Digital Games in Built Environment Education

Numerous games from various categories could be benefited in education related to architecture. However, to most frequently encountered and the most widely used games in architecture education are the simulation games. “The use of this game genre in the architecture studios as a means of problem solving dates back to the 1960’s. The simulation games can be used in architecture education for numerous purposes such as planning and the preservation of the built-environment, pointing out historical resources, determining the holistic characteristics of a certain area, bringing inactive areas into use again, acoustic and thermal performance calculations etc. ” [10].
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