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Guidelines for computer security in general practice

Guidelines for computer security in general practice

Results The study suggested that the most import- ant computer security issues in general practice were: the need for a nominated IT security co- ordinator; having written IT policies, including a practice disaster recovery plan; controlling access to different levels of electronic data; doing and testing backups; protecting against viruses and other mal- icious codes; installing firewalls; undertaking routine maintenance of hardware and software; and secur- ing electronic communication, for example via encryption. This information led to the production of computer security guidelines, including a one- page summary checklist, which were subsequently distributed to all GPs in Australia.
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Application of Game Theory in Computer Security

Application of Game Theory in Computer Security

Due to the capability of game theory to solve the situations of conflict and competition, Game Theory has been used as a mathematical tool in economics, politics, biology and human psychology. Nash Equilibrium, being the solution of a non-cooperative game, gives a stable state in a sense that no agent/player has any positive incentive to deviate from its current adopted strategy, when all other players of the game stick to their current moves. In Computer security, the cooperation to follow a certain protocol cannot be taken as for granted, keeping in view the selfish nature of now a day’s network entities. To cope with the selfish and competitive behavior of the network entities, Game Theory provides a feasible solution for resource utilization and service provisioning, Detection and defense against some forms of attack that threatens the optimal performance of computer networks. This paper presents the detailed overview of the Game Theory concepts and its applications in the Computer security, both from cooperative and non-cooperative perspectives.
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Introduction to Visualization for Computer Security

Introduction to Visualization for Computer Security

Abstract Networked computers are ubiquitous, and are subject to attack, misuse, and abuse. Automated systems to combat this threat are one potential solution, but most automated systems require vigilant human oversight. This automated approach undervalues the strong analytic capabilities of humans. While automation affords opportunities for increased scalability, humans provide the ability to handle excep- tions and novel patterns. One method to counteracting the ever increasing cyber threat is to provide the human security analysts with better tools to discover pat- terns, detect anomalies, identify correlations, and communicate their findings. This is what visualization for computer security (VizSec) researchers and developers are doing. VizSec is about putting robust information visualization tools into the hands of humans to take advantage of the power of the human perceptual and cognitive processes in solving computer security problems. This chapter is an introduction to the VizSec research community and the papers in this volume.
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Human-centred computer security

Human-centred computer security

We have given a relatively informal demonstration that our protocols seem to be near optimal in the trade-off be- tween human/empirical effort and the chance of a successful attack. We have also shown how the stronger attacker of this new protocol can be modelled on FDR. The author would like to find a better way of modelling this that does not have to be limited to a single manipulation – this development would be very similar to the evolution of the “perfect spy” of [6] from our early intruder models that had a small finite memory. Particularly in that case, he hopes that it might find use in other circumstances in computer security where combinatorial attacks on hashes are an issue.
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MSc Computer Security

MSc Computer Security

Computer security plays an important role in enabling the protection and trust required for business and society to effectively operate. Organisations and individuals increasingly depend on information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure, which frequently processes and stores large amounts of sensitive data. Consequently, there is significant security risk involved, and ICT systems need to be defended against many types of malicious attack. Every new ICT solution or system has the potential to introduce vulnerabilities, and be misused by attackers. Therefore, organisations require security expertise to assess, design, deploy, and maintain security solutions.
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COMPUTER SECURITY AND IMPACT ON COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION

COMPUTER SECURITY AND IMPACT ON COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION

While government agencies, major corporations and research institutions are examining the complex issues of protecting the Internet infrastructure against intrusions, CyberTerrorism, and even information warfare (Campen 1996; Minihan 1998), what and how should we as Computer Science educators prepare our students to operate, professionally, in such an insecure environment? I believe that it would take more than engineering and/or technology to cope with the crisis of computer security. In order to cope with the security issues, the revision of Computer Science curriculum cannot focus only on technical aspects of the discipline, but must also on broader, more comprehensive, and possibly "non-technical" aspects.
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HOME COMPUTER SECURITY AWARENESS

HOME COMPUTER SECURITY AWARENESS

This paper is based on phase 1 of the project; the identification of currently used practices for computer security. In order to identify the commonly used practices and tools for computer security, a questionnaire survey research was carried out at IUP in the Fall of 2004. This paper describes the methodology, findings from the questionnaire survey research, and the future work on the project.

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Computer Security Handbook 4th pdf

Computer Security Handbook 4th pdf

In Japan, the National Police Agency reported in February that computer crime was up 58 percent in 1998 compared with 1997— a 1,300 percent growth since the first statistics were kept in 1993. Specific crimes increased even more than the aggregate average; for example, forgery and data diddling cases grew 67 percent in 1998. Current Japanese laws do not consider unauthorized penetration of a com- puter system as a crime; only breaches of data integrity are criminal. 34 Allan Watt, director of forensic operations for computer security specialists S P Bates & Associ- ates of New Zealand, said that his studies strongly support the view that 80 percent of computer crime is perpetrated by insiders. He said that many executives dismiss the consequences of computer crime as malfunctions and warns that it is unwise to allow information technology (IT) staff to investigate suspected crime without supervision by forensic experts outside the department. His research also supports the widespread opinion that 90 percent of detected computer crime is unreported because of fears of embarrassment. 35 The Chinese Department of Public Security announced that it had solved 100 cases of criminal hacking in 1998 but estimated that this was only about 15 percent of the actual level of unauthorized system access. Reported computer crime was growing at an annual rate of 30 percent, the department said. About 95 percent of all Chinese systems on the Internet had been attacked last year, with many banks and other financial institutions the target of Chi- nese and international criminals. 36 The annual Australian Computer Crime and Security Survey, organized by the Victorian Computer Crime Investigation Squad and Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, reported on computer crimes in 350 of the largest Australian companies. In brief, about one-third of respondents had suffered one or more attacks on their systems in 1998; of those, 80 percent had experienced insider attacks; 60 percent experienced outsider attacks; and 15 percent of the respondents with any attacks claimed they had been the targets of industrial espionage. Almost three-quarters of all the respondents had no formal policy requiring notification of police authorities in case of attack. More than a fifth of all the respondents had experienced a breach of confidentiality, and almost a fifth reported a breach of data integrity. 37
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Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities

Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities

The IAEA, while recognizing the core validity of the ISO 27000 series and other standards across industries and business, wishes to focus attention on the specific conditions affecting computer security at nuclear facilities. Thus, the need for a publication recognizing and compiling relevant guidance and adequate solutions was identified. This publication brings together the knowledge and experience of specialists who have applied, tested and reviewed computer security guidance and standards within nuclear facilities and other critical infrastructure. It compiles and describes those special provisions, best practices and lessons learned which apply within the nuclear discipline and puts them in the context of a security programme consistent with other IAEA guidance and applicable industrial standards.
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Computer security guidelines

Computer security guidelines

This position suits someone (or two or more people who share the position) who is enthusiastic about computers. They do not need to have advanced technical knowledge, although they should be reasonably comfortable with the operating system and relevant application software. They require management skills and the ability to develop computer security policies in consultation with others in the practice. Quite likely, they will also be the general IT coordinator for the practice. The tasks that are listed below should either be executed by the computer security coordinator, or this person should be aware which tasks the technical service provider is executing.
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Computer Security - Tutorial Sheet 3: Network & Programming Security

Computer Security - Tutorial Sheet 3: Network & Programming Security

Edinburgh University Informatics wants to have a combined discussion forum for the two courses Computer Security and Computability and Intractability. It should be used by the students, all tutors and the examiners. To ensure that no confidential information about the assignments and exercises is leaked different security levels are needed:

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A Portable Computer Security Workshop

A Portable Computer Security Workshop

A common criticism of cyberwar exercises is that the very nature of the exercise tends to “encourage” attack as much as it does defense. We have handled this issue in two key ways, and to be clear about this, we agree that the point of the exercise is defense, not attack. First, at no point in our workshop is anyone encouraged to initiate an attack on another system, even though this is possible. The footprinting and port scanning exercises do not involve anything more than information gathering. All attacks are conducted and controlled by our systems staff without providing the details of how the attacks are mounted other than to identify the vulnerability exploited. Second, to highlight the ethics involved in computer security using the tools we provide, we quietly record all occurrences of unauthorized accesses by the participants to other systems during the course of the workshop. This information is then used later in a discussion about the ethics of acting on the information they have gained from footprinting. Workshop participants usually are chagrined to learn that we “caught them,” thereby making our point about ethical conduct better than we could have via a simple lecture point.
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Computer security guidelines

Computer security guidelines

This position suits someone (or two or more people who share the position) who is enthusiastic about computers. They do not need to have advanced technical knowledge, although they should be reasonably comfortable with the operating system and relevant application software. They require management skills and the ability to develop computer security policies in consultation with others in the practice. Quite likely, they will also be the general IT coordinator for the practice. The tasks that are listed below should either be executed by the computer security coordinator, or this person should be aware which tasks the technical service provider is executing.
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CSE 127 Computer Security

CSE 127 Computer Security

How physical locks work 5 Plug Driver pins Shear line Bottom pins.. courtesy Matt Blaze..[r]

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Computer Security from External Devices

Computer Security from External Devices

It refers to the management of identity, their authentication, authorization, and privileges/permissions within or across system and enterprise boundaries with the goal of increasing security and productivity while decreasing cost, downtime, and load on system. In an organization there is many ways to authenticate an employee uniquely by employee id, full name, face etc., but in digital word same has been done by digital identity [3].

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Network Security Controls. CSC 482: Computer Security

Network Security Controls. CSC 482: Computer Security

Drop packets arriving on external interface whose source IP addresses claims to be from internal network.. Egress Filtering.[r]

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Foundations of Computer Security pdf

Foundations of Computer Security pdf

The three principles of security management. Three simple principles can signifi- cantly reduce the security threats posed by employees in a large computer installation. Perhaps the most important of the three is the separation of duties. This principle, employed by many spy, anti-spy, and secret organizations, says that an employee should be provided only with the knowledge and data that are absolutely necessary for the performance of their duties. What an employee does not know, cannot be disclosed by him or leaked to others. The second principle is to rotate employees periodically. An employee should be assigned from time to time to different shifts, different work part- ners, and different jobs. Also, regular annual vacations should always be mandatory for those in security-related positions. Every time a person is switched to another job or task, they have to be retrained, which is why this principle adversely affects the overall efficiency of the organization. Also, when an employee is switched from task A to task B , they have to be given the data and knowledge associated with both tasks, which contradicts the principle of separation of duties. In spite of this, it is important to ro- tate employees because a person left too long in the same position may get bored with it and a bored security worker is a potentially dangerous worker. The third security management principle is to have every security-related task performed by an employee and then checked by another person. This way, no task becomes the sole responsibility of one person. This principle allows one person to find mistakes (and also sabotage) made by another. It slows down the overall work, but improves security.
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Computer Security Incident Response Team

Computer Security Incident Response Team

For the purposes of this document, an incident is defined as an event that has actual or potential adverse effects on computer or network resources resulting in misuse or abuse, compromise of information, or loss or damage of property or information. Any such events that originate from, are directed towards, or transit University controlled computer or network resources will fall under the purview of CSIRT. This definition is purposely made inclusive, however it is foreseen that many events classified with a "limited" severity rating may be handled by semi-automated means and not require any further escalation.
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Computer Security Basics

Computer Security Basics

Evaluations of Secure Systems 115 Security Policy Requirements 115 Discretionary Access Control 116 Object Reuse 118 Labels 119 Mandatory Access Control 124 Accountability Requirements 1[r]

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