Human Sciences

Top PDF Human Sciences:

Has welfarist criminology failed? Juvenile justice and the human sciences in Victoria ®

Has welfarist criminology failed? Juvenile justice and the human sciences in Victoria ®

The Children’s Court Clinic in Victoria supplied key services within the broader judicial administration of child welfare services but, despite the involvement of expertise from the human sciences did not effectively sustain ‘therapeutic intervention’ in the lives of young offenders. As such, welfare was not an effective counterpoint to the punitive model of criminal justice. The clinic itself provided little direct intervention in the family, and the social worker collected information required by the psychiatrist in compiling a report on family and child for the court. A specific role for the social worker was defined by his/her place in a strict hierarchy headed by a psychiatrist, signaling the further psychological colonizing of professional social work. Evidence drawn from these records suggests that claims about a ‘once dominant welfarist criminology’ (Garland, 1996) on the one hand, or a failure of the human sciences to curb crime (Alcorn, 1999) on the other, over-emphasise the distinction between the welfare and justice models. They also tend to understate the close relationship between the human sciences and the bureaucratic administration of the juvenile justice system dealing with children with social and behavioural difficulties. We suggest that drawing distinctions between human science and bureaucratic administration provides a limited foundation on which to understand the change in penal policies from a punitive judicial to a reformist welfare model. In the case of Victoria, criticisms of juvenile justice that presuppose the implementation of ‘welfarist or social reformist criminology’ in the past, or which draw support for the need for more punitive approaches on the basis of the failure of a ‘welfare model of justice’, are not sustained by historical evidence.
Show more

23 Read more

Law and norm: justice administration and the human sciences in early juvenile justice in Victoria

Law and norm: justice administration and the human sciences in early juvenile justice in Victoria

autonomous conduct is thought to be insufficiently developed’. 85 The human sciences contributed to processes for identifying and allocating such individuals and groups, developing the instruments of technical, political and social measurement of the ‘normal family’ as an object of governing. 86 Underpinning the discursive elements of the changes towards the new ‘science’ of crime in this period were the attempts to produce new categories of person through the assembling of detailed, and indeed infinite knowledge of the ‘habits, conduct and mode of living’ of populations needing to be governed. The specific effects of legal process centred around the children’s court was to mandate the conditions of possibility for the collection of this ‘social information’ upon which norms came to be constructed, and enforced a system of allocating persons on the basis of their measured capacity for self-governing.
Show more

27 Read more

Beyond Prejudice and Pride: The Human Sciences in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Latin America

Beyond Prejudice and Pride: The Human Sciences in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Latin America

Economic, psychological, and “racial” forces are routinely accounted for in the human sciences. Moreover, the human sciences engage questions of environment versus biology, scrutinizing the details of the local milieu. In Latin America, an additional particularity of the human sciences is that their subject matter frequently invites comparison with Europe and “universal” humanity. Here, science debates have routinely engaged questions about whether “we” are superior, inferior, or the same, about why “we” have fewer institutions or less government or popular support for our work. Explicitly or implicitly, they have raised comparative questions about “our” racial stock and national characteristics. (The question of who this “we” included more often than not remained murky and confused.) But the actual subjects of human science research in Latin America were in practice always local—for example, the science looked at Argentine criminals, Mexican mental patients, Andean Indians.
Show more

12 Read more

THE EXPERIENCES OF AFRICAN GRADUATE STUDENTS IN A COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCES

THE EXPERIENCES OF AFRICAN GRADUATE STUDENTS IN A COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCES

This study adds to the limited literature on the perspectives of graduate students from Africa studying in the United States. However, only students from one institution were included in the sample and findings were based on a small sample size. Attempts to generalize these findings to all African graduate students studying in the United States should be approached with caution. Findings from this research present many fruitful opportunities for informing Colleges of Human Sciences forums and community outreach. A future research project includes a longitudinal study in which participants are re-interviewed once they have graduated.
Show more

7 Read more

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES NUTRITION AND DIETETICS PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK Fall 2015

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SCIENCES SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES NUTRITION AND DIETETICS PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK Fall 2015

To maintain the public’s trust in dietitians, professional ethics begin in the basic training and dishonesty will not be tolerated. Acts of academic dishonesty may result in penalties ranging from a grade of zero on the paper/project/test to failure of the entire course and immediate dismissal from the program. Consequences will be determined by the instructor of the student’s course. Circumstances of the act of academic dishonesty and consequent penalties will be documented in the student’s academic file and reported to the School Director, Dean, and the School of Health and Human Sciences Student Affairs Committee in accordance with WCU policy. Students may appeal the instructor’s decision through the University’s appeals process.
Show more

21 Read more

Academic Programs. College of Agriculture and Human Sciences. College of Agriculture and Human Sciences Academic Programs ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

Academic Programs. College of Agriculture and Human Sciences. College of Agriculture and Human Sciences Academic Programs ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

Agriculture provides graduate support courses for the College of Education specializations in Agricultural Education. Graduate course work in Agriculture may also be applied to a masters’ degree program in Human Sciences, and related disciplines. Students seeking this option should apply for admission to the respective Department and consult with an Advisor.

6 Read more

The Transition to Led Illumination: A Case Study in “Faculty of Natural and Human Sciences” of Korça University

The Transition to Led Illumination: A Case Study in “Faculty of Natural and Human Sciences” of Korça University

The technical analysis that has been performed in this study shows a promising result for LED to replace the existing conventional fluorescent/halogen lighting. In light of this, a case study based on three floors building at the Faculty of Natural and Human Sciences. The studied building has three floors, three big halls, nine offices, 15 teaching classrooms, one library, and about 2000m2 outdoor lighted space that also plays an important role in electric energy consumption. The number of exact existing lighting has been estimated from the building by conducting a walking audit. As can be seen from Table 1 below, the 100% of offices existing lighting consists of T8, 36W lighting bulbs, 100% of teaching classrooms lighting also consist of T8, 36W lighting bulbs, while in halls, all lighting consists of T8, 18W. Although there are 14 Halogen outside lights, which are ON for the purpose of vigilance throughout the night. The outdoor lights are ON from 6 PM to 6 AM (Timing usage varies from season to season).
Show more

9 Read more

Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain

Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain

phenomena’ (p. 1). By contrast, we are never told what the parameters of the ‘human sciences’ are meant to be, the category being treated as self-evident and descriptive; it does not do any analytic work, and there is no discussion of its contemporary senses or its shifting meanings. All we are told by Bevir – who says more on the subject than any of the other contributors – is that the book ‘appeals to “the human sciences” rather than “the social sciences” in order to denaturalize contemporary categories, the assumptions informing them, and the institutions to which they have given rise’ (pp. 16–17). So the conscious anachronism is to herald a deliberately iconoclastic take on established disciplinary and conceptual distinctions in Victorian thought and scholarship. But this never quite emerges.
Show more

5 Read more

What could be the contribution of UNESCO’s Social and Human Sciences Sector?

What could be the contribution of UNESCO’s Social and Human Sciences Sector?

Thanks are given to all those who gave their time towards the preparation of this document, engaged in discussions during its development, and offered comments on drafts. This includes the Chair of the UKNC, Professor W John Morgan; UKNC Chief Executive, James Bridge; Senior Communications and Policy Officer, Ian White; UK Ambassador to UNESCO, Matthew Sudders; Academy of Social Sciences (Prof Cary Cooper CBE, Chair of Council); International Social Science Council (Dr Heidi Hackmann, Executive Director); International Sociological Association (Professor Michael Burawoy, President); Sage Publishers (Stephen Barr, President Sage International); and the Social and Human Sciences Sector of UNESCO (Pilar Álvarez-Laso, Assistant Director- General, and her colleagues).
Show more

20 Read more

IMPLEMENTATION OF GEOPORTAL IN OPEN ENVIRONMENT FOR THE COMMUNITY OF HUMAN SCIENCES AND SOCIETY

IMPLEMENTATION OF GEOPORTAL IN OPEN ENVIRONMENT FOR THE COMMUNITY OF HUMAN SCIENCES AND SOCIETY

The Center for Digital Geospatial Resources M²ISA (Centre de Res- sources Numériques – Méthodologies pour la Modélisation de l’Information Spatiale Appliquée aux Sciences de l’Homme et de la Société) is a structure which consists of about ten partners localized in geographically distant places called sites. To the scienti�c community of the Human Sciences and Society (SHS) they give knowledge and data which have a special characteristic: the spatial dimension. A Geoportal is under construction to enable communica- tion. The CNRS M²ISA is a structure placed in the UMR 8564-CEIAS; they have the characteristics of a Spatial Data Infrastructure (Masser 2005) ac- cording to the European directive of November 2006 1 . The partners belong
Show more

7 Read more

Department of Health and Human Sciences

Department of Health and Human Sciences

This agreement provides the terms under which the Practicum/Internship Site and the University will provide on- site educational experience to students who are enrolled in any of the fol[r]

40 Read more

Applying The Rasch Model: fundamental measurement in the human sciences

Applying The Rasch Model: fundamental measurement in the human sciences

highlights 01 the Second Edition include: • A new CD that features an introductory version of the iatest Winsteps program and lhe data files tor the book's examples, preprogrommed to un [r]

11 Read more

Applying The Rasch Model: fundamental measurement in the human sciences

Applying The Rasch Model: fundamental measurement in the human sciences

Contents Foreword Preface ix xiii 1 Why Measurement Is Fundamental 1 2 Important Principles of Measurement Made Explicit 15 3 Basic Principles of the Rasch Model 29 4 BUilding a Set of I[r]

12 Read more

Faculty of Health and Human Sciences School of Health Professions

Faculty of Health and Human Sciences School of Health Professions

The programme enjoys shared learning experiences so that students on the MSc & PG Dip Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration) programmes join students from the BSc (Hons) programme[r]

140 Read more

BRAIN AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES College of Health and Human Sciences 120 credits Student: PUID: Catalog Term:

BRAIN AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES College of Health and Human Sciences 120 credits Student: PUID: Catalog Term:

●PHYS 17200 Modern Mechanics [S] PHYS 21400 Nature of Physics [S] ●PHYS 22000 General Physics [S] ●PHYS 22100 General Physics [S] ●PHYS 23300 Physics for Life Sciences I ●PHYS 23400 Physics for Life Sciences II ●PHYS 22000 General Physics [S] ●PHYS 22100 General Physics [S]

5 Read more

An Analysis of English and Persian Academic Written Discourses in Human Sciences: An Evolutionary Account

An Analysis of English and Persian Academic Written Discourses in Human Sciences: An Evolutionary Account

Some researchers have focused on contrasting abstracts in two or more languages. Bonn and Swales (2007) have contrasted English and French language sciences journal abstracts. They have found some differences with respect to the linguistic features, formal and textual features and the way the research report is situated. Yakhontova (2006) investigated the cultural and disciplinary variation in academic discourse by using Applied Mathematics abstracts from conference papers in English and Slavic languages. Then the same researcher compared the results of this study with the previous findings of the studies conducted on the corresponding Applied Linguistics abstracts. The features compared included the rhetorical moves, using Swales' CARS Model, and their textual distribution, the paragraph organization of texts, the syntactic structures of titles and the use of the pronouns I / We. Significant differences were found between the two disciplines. Martin (2003) has conducted a study contrasting English and Spanish research paper abstracts in experimental social sciences, using move analysis and found some degree of convergence between the two languages. Leonor (2001) investigated intercultural, interdisciplinary differences in English and Spanish with attention to linguistic and textual features, following Swales’ CARS Model. A piece of research done by Busch-Lauer (1995) highlights the effect of culture on abstract genres; German medical abstracts written by native German speakers and native English speakers were contrasted considering their length, move structures and linguistic aspects. The results indicated some differences between the abstracts in the two languages.
Show more

19 Read more

The Nature Nurture Problem Revisited  Some Epistemological Topics in Contemporary Human Sciences

The Nature Nurture Problem Revisited Some Epistemological Topics in Contemporary Human Sciences

Biological determinism or reductionism cannot explain hu- man emotions and behaviour since all higher psychological functions characterizing humans are culturally created. Hor- mones are for instance involved in all kinds of love, but only as energizing mechanisms, The behavior, thoughts, feelings, and experiences of love is culturally determined and variable and not biologically determined as in animals. Biology has lost its determining function in human behavior, which is only “natu- ral” given the unique cultural environment in which people live. Culture determines the form, content, and conditions of behav- ior. In contrast, the form, content, and conditions of animal behavior are determined by natural, biochemical elements (Ratner, 2011). Psychology involves and includes natural, bio- logical processes, such as neuronal and hormonal activity, just as it involves breathing air. Just as breathing air is a precondi- tion of psychology which plays no specific determining role in the form, content, mechanisms, and function of psychology, however, so other natural biological processes play no specific determining role either. Their role is analogous to that of breathing. Without breathing, hormones, and the brain, psy- chological activity would cease; however, with them it is only potentiated, not determined (Ratner, 2011).
Show more

5 Read more

College of Human Sciences I. SIGNIFICANT TRENDS: There were really no significant trends in the College of Human Sciences.

College of Human Sciences I. SIGNIFICANT TRENDS: There were really no significant trends in the College of Human Sciences.

It should be noted three significant changes were started during this time period, which will impact the 2013-2014 catalog: a new Bachelor of Science program in Athletic Training (Kinesiology); a department name change for the Department of Apparel, Education Studies, and Hospitality Management; and a move for the Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies program from the Department of Apparel, Education Studies, and Hospitality Management to the Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

5 Read more

HECO 1315 (3:3:3) Food Preparation and Meal Management. Human Sciences. Department of Science Division of Arts and Sciences South Plains College

HECO 1315 (3:3:3) Food Preparation and Meal Management. Human Sciences. Department of Science Division of Arts and Sciences South Plains College

Discuss food buying strategies such as calculating food costs, planning food budgets, and creating grocery lists... Explain terminology used in basic food preparation.[r]

6 Read more

Paradigmatic resonance and dysjunction in the development of the human sciences : accountability and expertism in the history of parturial practices

Paradigmatic resonance and dysjunction in the development of the human sciences : accountability and expertism in the history of parturial practices

1 Nineteenth century maternal and infant mortality did not respond to hospitalisation and parturient women were not universally regarded as the obvious and natural beneficiaries of advan[r]

291 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...